lpr5184

Perry Sultana...

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Back from town with more aluminum...

Next I'll choose which side of the tracing to use and glue it to the aluminum plate with spray adhesive.

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Nice looking spruce!

A bit of paraffin rubbed on the blade gives fantastic lubrication for aluminum, on saber saws scroll saws or band saws or even table saws.

I have cut 2.5 inch thick with a saber saw perfectly using paraffin for lubrication,, the aluminum won't stick to the blade.

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E, you could simply run your purfling tool around the half of the plastic template you prefer, snap off the edge, tidy up witha knife and little plane, and use that to make a form. 

I use that material for tots of things. It's so easy to work. I don't know what it's called but i buy it in a model shop.

Would you be tempted to make this one on the back, with no form at all?

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C,  I've been meaning to ask where you bought the material and how you cut it. It's great stuff and I'd like to buy more to use. I could use it for a template but I didn't want to change anything you did.

I would be tempted to build one on the back with your guidance. (I'm in no hurry, I can wait)...:)  Trying to do that on my own I'm afraid I would make a mess of things and I don't have a lot of wood to sacrifice.

Is it the building method Perry used? I know you said he used corner blocks so I just figured he used an inside form but the symmetry is so close it makes me wonder...

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Not to butt in here, but just my experience in building on the back, and I welcome any feed back on my method, C is the man!

I would encourage it absolutely, with your level of workmanship and steady consistency it wouldn't be a problem at all.

Most of my violas have been commissions built on the back, I didn't have a mold for violas for years. I was shocked at how clean and straight the first one came out, all of my unseen fears were completely unfounded. Built on the back can be accomplished as neat and clean as with a mold, no one could possibly know if that is what I want. It is all determined by the straight flatness of the glue surface of the ribs, the precision of the bends, the squareness  and perfection of the blocks, and the flatness of the surface you are building upon. It can be built on MDF or on the back itself, anything flat. I don't build on a finished back unless I want the added flexibility to create some twisted looking recipe of coolness.

Mark out the line that the ribs will meet

lightly glue on the blocks, leaving the backside cut large and parallel to the glue surface of the ribs for clamping.

glue on ribs, glue on carefully bent linings

Level the gluing surface of the ribs, ready for the top plate

Finish the top plate to the point you are ready to glue it on using your standard way of doing things, then attach it

remove the ribs with top plate attached,  add linings and finish back and glue. Or attach neck first then add the back.

I would really like to build one of these things for me to play,,,,

Have a ton O fun!

P.S  Looking at the wood again, isn't it funny how the f's match the stripes on the flawed back wood,,,,, I'd bend it to keep it at the surface as it is, cut the center out a bit add wings to the bottom and keep it. Maybe you want to trade it for something, with the pattern?

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Evan,  Thanks for that! I would definitely be interested in trying the BOB method.

You can have the red maple. PM me your address and I'll drop it in the mail. I cut ribs off too so you have matching ribs. The seller replaced the back with some quilted bigleaf. 

As far as sharing the sultana's pattern please contact Conor. I'm not comfortable sharing it without his permission.

 

EDIT - My apologies Evan but the billet is gone to a friend who stopped by over the weekend.

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Over the weekend I purchased two more sets of wood. I'll be using this maple and spruce on the Sultana.  Harvested in northen Appalachia.

Maple.thumb.JPG.5b6859c85c2063b85d506039bc72db73.JPG

Spruce.thumb.JPG.d455cdac18f77a86bcabda71b3230d8e.JPG

 

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After cutting out the template on the band saw I blow out all the aluminum filings when finished and then wipe down the blade and wheels. The filings can become lodged into the next piece of wood you cut. 

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Not sure if you have this example so i scanned the catalogue picture and description for you. Seems to be five courses of double wire strings.imgmspaper070.pdf

This is from the catalogue of the Carel Van Leeuwen Boomkamp Collection published in Amsterdam 1971.

imgmspaper069.jpg

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I agree that it looks at the nut as if there are 6 courses with the 2 bass ones single strung. But the tailpiece looks as if some alterations have been made to the bass strings arrangement. 

 

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Wood arrived and looks excellent. Back and sides are from the same piece of wood and I had the rib stock sent thick because I like to saw my own.

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My first time buying from him and he was very helpful in picking out wood for me... and on a Sunday afternoon! If I had found him years sooner I would have driven down there and stocked up. He seems like the kind of guy you just want to hang out with.

A very nice man.

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When I'm satisfied with the outline I offset the outline with a compass...the distance is the sum of the rib thickness plus edge overhang. Then cut and finish back to the line.

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Do you normally make two templates? One for the back/belly outline and a separate for the mould/rib/garland outline as you are doing in the above photo?

or.... is this a "one off" and are you "sacrificing" the plate patterns for the mould/rib/garland pattern? (after marking your plate wood)

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I make one half template. Once the garland is completed then you trace around the garland with a washer to establish the plate outlines.

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On ‎9‎/‎30‎/‎2017 at 12:08 PM, lpr5184 said:

When I'm satisfied with the outline I offset the outline with a compass...the distance is the sum of the rib thickness plus edge overhang. Then cut and finish back to the line.

 

The final step for the half template is to drill two holes on the center line. The template can then be placed on whatever wood you choose and drilled.  In this case I'm using walnut Appleply from States Industries.

 

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As posted earlier the Sultana's neck was replaced. I assume this photo is similar to an original Sultana neck. Notice the back plate button area and rib join at the neck.

Sultana27.jpg.282ece8bf8aecba1b6c199f918708ca3.jpg

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