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Violin Varnish Italy

Instrument varnished with my product

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22 minutes ago, Arrius said:

This looks amazing, my violin is the same colour. Now I am wondering how I can achieve the same results myself. 

Hi , i have forgot to mention that a third varnishwas used for this violin. 
The varnish that i have forgot is a orange varnish ( zinc/madder rosinate oil varnish) 
 

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4 hours ago, Thomas Coleman said:

Thanks.  I used two coats of his clear "fondo" and four coats of his "golden brown" iron rosinate.  That's on top of a mineral ground.  The transparency is really great.

What method did you use to apply? Brush? Hand? Thick? Thin?

I imagine that you applied thicker coats, being there only six of them.

Thanks.

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1 hour ago, Nick Allen said:

What method did you use to apply? Brush? Hand? Thick? Thin?

I imagine that you applied thicker coats, being there only six of them.

Thanks.

I used my fingers, except for the scroll.  Actually, I don't thick the film is very thick.  Not thin either but not thick.  If that makes sense.  The bare wood was stained.  Also keep in mind that the fondo ground coats impart very little color so that's actually only four coats!!! I concede that there is the smallest possibility that I forgot to tick mark one of my coats on the back of a test piece (varnish days become a blur to me after awhile) and that there are 5 coats but I don't think so.  No matter what, there are no more than 5.  I made a video of the application for a friend, if you're interested in seeing it let me know and I can email it to you.

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41 minutes ago, Thomas Coleman said:

I used my fingers, except for the scroll.  Actually, I don't thick the film is very thick.  Not thin either but not thick.  If that makes sense.  The bare wood was stained.  Also keep in mind that the fondo ground coats impart very little color so that's actually only four coats!!! I concede that there is the smallest possibility that I forgot to tick mark one of my coats on the back of a test piece (varnish days become a blur to me after awhile) and that there are 5 coats but I don't think so.  No matter what, there are no more than 5.  I made a video of the application for a friend, if you're interested in seeing it let me know and I can email it to you.

I also would be interested in the viseo if you don’t mind. I’m thinking of trying this varnish and more info is always good:)

thanks,

jesse

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2 hours ago, JacksonMaberry said:

This is a test sample of Nunzio's stuff. Five layers of luteola yellow as a ground, six of brown iron, three of Amber. 

Are your coats relatively thick or thin? Are you brushing or using your hand?

Thanks!

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38 minutes ago, Nick Allen said:

Are your coats relatively thick or thin? Are you brushing or using your hand?

Thanks!

I tried a few times and failed to upload a pic showing a cross section. I was wondering myself after thinking 14 coats was a lot, so I ripped off a section with the bandsaw. It's virtually imperceptible in cross section, so the coats I applied must have been very thin. It's just that this varnish is very intensely colored. I love it.

I played around with a few different methods of application, and what I decided worked best for me was padding it on undiluted with foam cosmetic wedges, lightly sanding with 1000 grit dabbed in mild soapy water between coats.

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On 5/23/2018 at 4:21 PM, JacksonMaberry said:

I tried a few times and failed to upload a pic showing a cross section. I was wondering myself after thinking 14 coats was a lot, so I ripped off a section with the bandsaw. It's virtually imperceptible in cross section, so the coats I applied must have been very thin. It's just that this varnish is very intensely colored. I love it.

I played around with a few different methods of application, and what I decided worked best for me was padding it on undiluted with foam cosmetic wedges, lightly sanding with 1000 grit dabbed in mild soapy water between coats.

Hmm. Seems to be my approach. Many ultra thin coats. A ground, then a clear coat of regular varnish, then many coats of colored varnish, until I reach the desired color. I only sand every other coat. I kind of like the subtle texture that the orange peel leaves if you knock it down most of the way.

Thanks!

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Jackson,

I like your technique! It's much faster than mine. Please explain further what you are using to apply and what varnish of Nunzio's you are using in the video.

Are you thinning the varnish? The coats look nice and thin. What about dust?

Great video Thanks for posting.

E.

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5 minutes ago, lpr5184 said:

Jackson,

I like your technique! It's much faster than mine. Please explain further what you are using to apply and what varnish of Nunzio's you are using in the video.

Are you thinning the varnish? The coats look nice and thin. What about dust?

Great video Thanks for posting.

E.

Thank you! I'm applying the luteola ground there, using a large teardrop shaped makeup blending sponge. I have to use smaller sponges for the ribs, and a small brush for the scroll.

I have been applying the varnish at full thickness and yet have still managed to get extremely thin coats. As I may have mentioned above, my final test piece had no fewer than fifteen layers, and yet in cross section it could not be seen, by the naked eye at least. 

As far as dust goes, I have not been doing anything special to avoid it, but it has not seemed to be a problem (knock on wood!) I am sanding every other coat and have not had more than a couple of nits. 

One thing I will say is that the sponge "wastes" quite a lot of varnish. I am beginning to think I will not continue with this method because of that, and will go back to fingerpainting, which gets results every bit as good, just takes longer. After spending two hundred or so hours making a violin, what's a few more? 

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