lpr5184

Amati Viola

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On March 30, 2017 at 11:43 PM, lpr5184 said:

Judging from the tight bends in Jacksons photo his lining wood appears to be flat sawn. The quarter sawn Sitka I have will not bend that tight of a radius at 2.0 mm thick.

So that tells me that quarter sawn linings are stiffer than flat sawn. Perhaps this is the reason all the linings I have purchased have been flat sawn. It is far easier to bend flat sawn linings. So I wonder what the effect of stiffer ribs will be on my viola?

This leads me to ponder the difference between a flat sawn and quarter sawn back on violas. If flat sawn has more flexibility then quartered,  then is that why a lot of violas use low density/slab cut backs?

The CT scans in the DVD that came with the book might show whether the linings are flat or quarter sawn.  I have the strad 3D as well which shows ct scans of two strads and a GDG. It will be intersting if they all have the linings cut the same way. 

-Jim

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3 hours ago, lpr5184 said:

Hey Evan,

Hope all is well with you and hope you guys made it through the winter OK. My mom tells me they had A LOT of snow in Weiser this year with many buildings collapsing under the weight of the snow.

What are you working on?

 

E

And You all as well,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

Lots of snow here, a bit worried about the roof at times, I used extra nails and braces built well over code so far so good.............................thought maybe I should have measured things a bit ahead of time,,,, floor to ceiling,, just to keep an eye on things,, a bit of a sweat,, it happened fast,,,just like sweet death.

Working on?

Model a, fiddles, model a, soccer, model a, fiddles, some lady just brought over a bass she said I set up 14 yrs ago, it was wonderful,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,said she,

the neck is broken off. ouch!

Don't ever fix a bass for anyone, they multiply like fruit flys, and they all will fly straight to YOU!

You really make me want to start a fresh one, VERY NICE WORK  Big E

I've have the ribs on the 1704 Pietro Mantura mold for a year, a DaSalo ribs top and back ready for a bar and glue,

and  DelGesu ribs and back, I'm a polygamist violin maker. I want to start a strad, and a stainer, and an amati,,,,

Not like You and Don,,you guys are so,,,so,, so controlled. It's a good thing that my liver is shot and I can't drink,, God's little favor for me.

Good Seeing You

Evan

Love your thread

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19 hours ago, Nick Allen said:

Some violins have a straight line taper...

Interesting. A straight line taper would not pre-stress the plate at all. It would just make the belly appear slightly slanted relative to the back. Hmmm... I wonder if it was a way to control the inside volume and thus adjust the frequency of the air mode? Or maybe a way to put a little more tilt in the neck relative to the back without it making the violin look weird.

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On 3/30/2017 at 11:43 PM, lpr5184 said:

Judging from the tight bends in Jacksons photo his lining wood appears to be flat sawn. The quarter sawn Sitka I have will not bend that tight of a radius at 2.0 mm thick.

So that tells me that quarter sawn linings are stiffer than flat sawn. Perhaps this is the reason all the linings I have purchased have been flat sawn. It is far easier to bend flat sawn linings. So I wonder what the effect of stiffer ribs will be on my viola?

This leads me to ponder the difference between a flat sawn and quarter sawn back on violas. If flat sawn has more flexibility then quartered,  then is that why a lot of violas use low density/slab cut backs?

I checked the CT scans and the original has quarter sawn linings as well.  So your in good company E.

Transverse slice G Amati viola.pdf

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I

13 hours ago, Nick Allen said:

Did you rout or cut the channels? Just out of curiosity. 

I use Tom Croen's router jig to cut the purfling channel. A very fast and precise tool. The corners and under the button still have to be finished with the knife. If you are just getting into violin making, I would buy one of Tom's cutter's while still available. Unless you prefer to hand cut the channel. Different horses for different courses, I suppose.

EDIT - The Croen tool uses a Foredom flex shaft machine, so the investment cost is more than a Dremel router jig. A foot switch really helps too.

 

Edited by lpr5184

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2 hours ago, JacksonMaberry said:

Looks wonderful, and certainly a good endorsement for the Croen. If I had $500 or so lying around I'd consider the setup.

Thanks. I'll be selling my set up in a couple of years. Being just a hobbyist it's had little use and the jig is designed and machined to last.

That said I have always wanted to try hand cutting the purfling channel. I really like the cutter that Roger uses. And Davide Sora makes it look way to easy in his videos. I'm sure it is not that easy.

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Davide makes everything look easy! Best thing I learned about hand cutting the groove I learned from Michael Doran here on this forum. It's to shape the blade such that it can cut in either direction. A little soap helps a lot too. 

When you're ready to sell that rig let me know, I'm interested. 

Edited by JacksonMaberry
Autocorrect

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4 minutes ago, Nick Allen said:

Anyone here endorsing the Stew-Mac purfling router jig? It's significantly cheaper and seems to do a good job.

There is a killer thread here somewhere on all manner of purfling solutions. I think the major beef folks had with the stewmac is the lack of depth stop. 

You can save $100 on the Croen if you use it with the Dremel fortiflex system instead, and yes it will fit. 

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The .55 maple feels nice and is visually stunning. Too bad Vlado Spillar is no longer selling wood. I bought ten sets of maple from him and have been waiting 5 years to use it. Wood this nice deserves the best varnish. I started off using Joe Robson's balsam ground and still find it hard to beat.  Since there is nobody waiting for this fiddle it can have plenty of time in the sun to darken those flames naturally without a chemical burn.

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12 hours ago, lpr5184 said:

The .55 maple feels nice and is visually stunning. Too bad Vlado Spillar is no longer selling wood. I bought ten sets of maple from him and have been waiting 5 years to use it. Wood this nice deserves the best varnish. I started off using Joe Robson's balsam ground and still find it hard to beat.  Since there is nobody waiting for this fiddle it can have plenty of time in the sun to darken those flames naturally without a chemical burn.

004.JPG.9fb4415d39fcd8cd017f620d7e9e02b2.JPG

Look'in very zen these days Big E,, gorgeous work!

 

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Back arching is nearly done and been playing with the edge work a little. I decided to buy a B&C counterform from Cremona tools rather than make one. It came in today so now I can start hollowing the back.

 

 

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12 hours ago, Nick Allen said:

Christ almighty is that smooth. Very smooth indeed. What thickness scraper do you use for final scraping?

I'm not sure what the thickness is but it is very thin and very sharp like a razor with no hook. On the ribs I also use a razor's edge to finish scrape. The surface is smooth now but after wetting the grain will regain some texture.

I  wet the surface, let dry and burnish the maple with horsetail. Spruce is done the same way only I don't burnish the raised grain with horsetail. I use a brush instead.

And this one I'm going for a new fiddle with straight varnish. The hard part is trying not to ding it up.

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5 hours ago, lpr5184 said:

And this one I'm going for a new fiddle with straight varnish. The hard part is trying not to ding it up.

Yeah!  Don't worry about accidental dings. They're honest beauty marks that tell a story. 

-Jim 

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7 hours ago, Jim Bress said:

Yeah!  Don't worry about accidental dings. They're honest beauty marks that tell a story. 

-Jim 

Then I must be making the most beautiful violin ever that tells a LOOOOOONG story. 

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