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Late 19th Century French?


crookedfingers
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The rib mitres are one of the things giving me pause for thought.

The label gives the name of a reputable late 19th century French maker. So we would expect the ribs to be finished very precisely, and for the inking to neatly cover the whole width of the exposed rib (the violin being built on an outside mold and the hidden rib being feathered into the exposed rib which is cut square).

Here we have a mishmash of rib joints, some thin some thick, and they aren't vertical enough for a fine French maker who would use inking.

What's the name in the violin? :)

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Thank you so much for the feedback!

Unfortunately I didn't take a picture of the back. Here is the front.

DU1vmwR.jpg?2

Here are images I found of a violin by the purported maker. 

G0f6WEa.jpg?1

and the side:

MUu6ClL.jpg?2

and here again is my amateur photo of the violin of interest, same angle:

OHtaKWB.jpg?1

Martin, I will PM you the name of the maker. Didn't mean to be mysterious but I imagine once I post it on the forum it can be easily traced back to the shop this is being consigned and I don't want them to be shed in negative light associated with the "amateur setup"...

 

 

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I guess the 'Hills' appointments feel a bit sacrilegious if it's a french instrument ... Painted scroll edges but not on the F-Holes ? Probably just me there as I'm used to seeing both together ... then again ... I'm sure many here would disagree.

Overall the scroll doesn't look familiar to me for a 19th century french fiddle. 

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Nice!

The main thing to note with the violin from the Philharmonie is the way the purfling travels towards the c bouts in the corners - this is a very specific piece of French style. The OP instrument by contrast has purfling which sits in the middle of the corners. And as Addie has pointed out, it looks like mass produced purfling.

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The scroll looks very French, particularly from the back, the way the f-holes are cut too (vertical cut with a knife, not in a right angle to the slant of the surface of the top). Most French violins I have seen have relatively high linings and more square shaped blocks on top on bottom. The edge work and purfling doesn't make sense at all, as Martin pointed out.

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On 3/12/2017 at 8:50 PM, martin swan said:

Nice!

The main thing to note with the violin from the Philharmonie is the way the purfling travels towards the c bouts in the corners - this is a very specific piece of French style. The OP instrument by contrast has purfling which sits in the middle of the corners. And as Addie has pointed out, it looks like mass produced purfling.

When you say that the purfling travels towards the c-bouts in the corners, do you mean that the purfling comes closer to the edge around the corners?

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Thank you all for your response and sharing your knowledge!

Back to the instrument--the price is quite a bit below the auction prices for the purported maker, but substantially more than a regular trade instrument. The same seller has another instrument, priced similarly, from another well-known French maker, which makes me wonder if this is kind of his thing:

https://t2-auctions.com/auctions/lot/?csid=2198568960&cpid=3429826560&filter_key=a455a59e11acfbe87c1fe41a6b4cee8f&sCategory_ID=36

https://t2-auctions.com/auctions/lot/?csid=2198568960&cpid=3429826560&filter_key=a455a59e11acfbe87c1fe41a6b4cee8f&sCategory_ID=36

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