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Brandon_Williams

Shop Lighting

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Luis, thank you for the information.  I measured the swing-arm lamp I mentioned above.  The maximum inside diameter of the reflector is 5 3/4 inches with a depth of 5 inches (measured from the top of the reflector to the bottom of the socket).  So, your suggested lamps should work.

Thanks

Mike D

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43 minutes ago, Mike_Danielson said:

Luis, thank you for the information.  I measured the swing-arm lamp I mentioned above.  The maximum inside diameter of the reflector is 5 3/4 inches with a depth of 5 inches (measured from the top of the reflector to the bottom of the socket).  So, your suggested lamps should work.

Thanks

Mike D

YW.

If you can, test the lamp in the fixture before you buy it, they're quite expensive!

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2 hours ago, David Burgess said:

At some point, I may try a ceiling mounted dental exam light. Not so expensive, used.

http://www.ebay.com/bhp/dental-ceiling-light

Those are awesome, but you have to pay extra for an dental hygienist assistant to move the light for you and bring up the dust collector nozzle when you say suction.  :P

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10 hours ago, JacksonMaberry said:

...any recommendations for LED bulbs for your bench lamps? 

Naturally it depends on what bench lamp you have and what you're trying to look at.  I have a fairly cheap swing-arm lamp that uses standard screw base bulbs.  I wanted as much light as possible, white light, and narrow beam "spotlight".  More power = larger, heavier bulb, and the one I finally found is a compromise that requires frequent tightening up of the lamp joints to keep it from sagging down.  Narrow-beam spotlights are not that common; it took a while to find one.

It was interesting to re-read my previous post; I have since converted all of my fluorescent overhead tube fixtures to LEDs.

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Get lamps that have at least 5000K color temperature--5500K would be even better if you want something the resembles sunlight in the shop.  And at least 60 watt equivalent but 100 watt might be better--it is possible for the 100 watt lights to be too bright for close work.

Get the long arm fixtures from McMaster-Carr like I recommend in an earlier part of this post--you will eventually be sorry if you get the cheap, short ones.

Mike D

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1 hour ago, Mike_Danielson said:

Get lamps that have at least 5000K color temperature--5500K would be even better if you want something the resembles sunlight in the shop.  And at least 60 watt equivalent but 100 watt might be better--it is possible for the 100 watt lights to be too bright for close work.

Get the long arm fixtures from McMaster-Carr like I recommend in an earlier part of this post--you will eventually be sorry if you get the cheap, short ones.

Mike D

Mike,

Thanks for this. For now I'll stick with the junk lamp I've got, but my bulb situation has become untenable. Earlier in the day, I went out on a limb and ordered some bulbs from Waveform, which as luck would have it meet the specs you suggested exactly. I'll report back once they're in. 

On an unrelated note, I saw one of your fiddles the other day. Nice work.

J

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We bought a new build apartment 6 years ago, entirely lit by 40 LED GU10. We only use it 1 week in 6 and in effectively 1 year of use all those lamps have failed, some after only a few months.  I have been replacing with Phillips, who are leaders in the technology, and none have failed.  I have had a similar, but not so extreme, experience in our house where bulb type LED lamps were bought locally and I replace those with Phillips too. Buy cheap. buy twice.

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On 9/26/2019 at 8:21 AM, Don Noon said:

 

It was interesting to re-read my previous post; I have since converted all of my fluorescent overhead tube fixtures to LEDs.

Which ones did you end up with, Don? Did you install new fixtures, or use the conversion LEDs in the existing fluorescent fixtures?

9 hours ago, Mike_Danielson said:

Get lamps that have at least 5000K color temperature--5500K would be even better if you want something the resembles sunlight in the shop.

One of the things holding me back from LEDs is "color rendition", which is different from "color temperature".  Some LEDs have a very narrow spectrum, and will fail to show some of the colors present. When retouching, these colors might be present in the original, but not show at all under a narrow spectrum light. The retouching can look perfect under the narrow spectrum light, but stick out like a sore thumb when illuminated with a broader spectrum light, such as an incandescent bulb or daylight.

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1 hour ago, David Burgess said:

Which ones did you end up with, Don? Did you install new fixtures, or use the conversion LEDs in the existing fluorescent fixtures?

I used the conversion tubes in the old fluorescent fixtures, but rewired to bypass the ballasts.  Supposedly the LED's can work without the rewire, but I figured the ballast would just be a parasitic load.

It has been a while, so I'm not sure I remember correctly, but I think there was a color rendition spec. on the package, and I went for the better ones.  In any case, it's a ton better than the fluorescent ones.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-CRI_LED_lighting

This is a Wiki article on CRI (color rendering index) and LED lights.  LED lights do not do a good job of reproducing sunlight.  Manufacturers seem to avoid mentioning the CRI of their lamps.  The Wiki article says that Philips was the first to get a CRI of 80 which is not terribly good.  95 is a much better number, but I have not seen such a value with the LED bulbs.  Perhaps Philips bulbs are the best you can do at this time--any ideas out there?

The only safe way of color matching is to use real sunlight.

Mike D

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31 minutes ago, JacksonMaberry said:

Wow, those color rendering specs are rivaling those of the rather pricey fluorescent bulbs in my varnishing area, if the specs are accurate. Thanks so much.

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12 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

Wow, those color rendering specs are rivaling those of the rather pricey fluorescent bulbs in my varnishing area, if the specs are accurate. Thanks so much.

I'll share my subjective thoughts when I get them, but I don't have any equipment to test their claims. I did find the following review, which is what pushed me over the edge:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.reddit.com/r/Lighting/comments/axntr5/review_waveform_lighting_a19_high_cri_led_bulbs/

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Got the Waveform bulbs today. Initial impressions -

Nice color of light, reminds me of indirect late morning daylight. 

Bright enough, but I wouldn't mind another hundred lumens or so (it's 800). 

Shooting the bulb with my cellphone camera reveals no flicker, so they delivered on that as far as I'm concerned. 

It was an $18 bulb, but as long as it lasts all 25000 hours, I won't complain.

 

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20 hours ago, JacksonMaberry said:

Got the Waveform bulbs today. Initial impressions -

Nice color of light, reminds me of indirect late morning daylight. 

Bright enough, but I wouldn't mind another hundred lumens or so (it's 800). 

Shooting the bulb with my cellphone camera reveals no flicker, so they delivered on that as far as I'm concerned. 

It was an $18 bulb, but as long as it lasts all 25000 hours, I won't complain.

 

Thanks, Jackson. One interesting thing in the specs was the unusually low weight. Some of the LED bulbs I've tried in my desk lamps were too heavy for the countersprings.

Maybe I'll look into some of their fluorescent tube replacements. I wonder what the difference is between the super-pricey ones and the less expensive ones?

https://store.waveformlighting.com/collections/t5-t8-led-tube

 

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I use two 3 overhead lights for general lighting, 2 bench mounted lamps from IKEA -$10 each! these are the old ones with the on off on the lamp shade -- these are much more useable than the new ones which have the on off on the cord. 

I don't do re-touching, but I have an OTTLITE with a full spectrum CFD bulb for times when I need to see accurate colours 

lighting.jpg

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