Edward Herron-Allen ebook...


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20 minutes ago, Nick Allen said:

So I stumbled across this: 

https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=73HCAgAAQBAJ

I don't think it's the same as the other Herron-Allen book. Or is it the same, just repackaged in electronic form? I'm trying to contemplate if it's worth the $14 lol. 

It's not. It's free :

https://archive.org/details/cu31924022320216

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How did this guy even get away with writing this book? I know it's been discussed to lengths before, but did he just ask a few dudes and then write his interpretation of it? There is some useful info, I've heard. But I've also heard that a good portion of this text is preposterous. 

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39 minutes ago, Nick Allen said:

There is some useful info, I've heard. But I've also heard that a good portion of this text is preposterous. 

If there was nothing else available, then I suppose it's better than nothing at all.  But we have plenty of much better stuff around these days.  I have a copy (my first book on the subject), and it is somewhere in a box, never to be brought out again.  Referred to by a violinmaker I know as "Violinmaking as it Wasn't and Isn't".  And I agree.

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My 0.02 cents worth:  Loved the book.  Easy to read, entertaining...got me all excited and interested in the process.  Even at that point I could tell that it probably wasn't my best bet if I actually wanted to build a real instrument, but it explained 'how'.  Totally worthwhile as an introductory source of information.

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Armed with good reading comprehension, Heron Allen's book, some wood and hand tools, one could build a playable instrument.

By today's standards, it might seem archaic, but the general information and method is there. Besides, the violin wasn't really a new technological breakthrough, being around for 300 years before his book was written. I actually enjoyed the read.

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1 hour ago, jacobsaunders said:

The original Heron-Allen is an excelent book, where one can find no end of interesting Details and insights. I could well understand that upper class victorian English is above the head of some tree dwellers over there.

Oh dear, I only have a second edition.  I believe the second is referred to in the trade as the troglodyte edition.  Not sure if that's better or worse than the tree-dweller edition. :rolleyes:

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4 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

The original Heron-Allen is an excelent book, where one can find no end of interesting Details and insights. I could well understand that upper class victorian English is above the head of some tree dwellers over there.

LOL ...some of us "tree dwellers" prefer the more civilized term "savage" . LOL , But seriously , What would life be like without trees? 

  I do have The book, have read it once or twice , about half seems good , the other half ...not so good .About par for the course.

 

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2 hours ago, Addie said:

Oh dear, I only have a second edition.  I believe the second is referred to in the trade as the troglodyte edition.  Not sure if that's better or worse than the tree-dweller edition. :rolleyes:

I'd say that the "Troglodyte Edition", by definition, would be the one that "Klosterneuburg Man" (Homo donauthalensis) follows while scraping away at a top plate with a sharp flint.  No doubt he also has some of Petherick's works to consult during restorations.  BTW, we here are "woodland-dwellers". :P;)

That matter disposed of, I also enjoy reading Victorian publications, but realize that it requires better vocabulary and grammatical skills than is the current norm.  For those who might feel overly challenged by the Victorian violin literature, might I suggest https://www.walmart.com/ip/Violin-for-Dummies-FDV-100-Learner-s-Package/16537014

For those who can't quite handle so much text, there's always You Tube. :lol:

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21 minutes ago, Violadamore said:

I'd say that the "Troglodyte Edition", by definition, would be the one that "Klosterneuburg Man" (Homo donauthalensis) follows while scraping away at a top plate with a sharp flint.  No doubt he also has some of Petherick's works to consult during restorations.  BTW, we here are "woodland-dwellers". :P;)

That matter disposed of, I also enjoy reading Victorian publications, but realize that it requires better vocabulary and grammatical skills than is the current norm.  For those who might feel overly challenged by the Victorian violin literature, might I suggest https://www.walmart.com/ip/Violin-for-Dummies-FDV-100-Learner-s-Package/16537014

For those who can't quite handle so much text, there's always You Tube. :lol:

Say "no" to Petherick.

No petherick.jpg

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56 minutes ago, John Mason said:

Build 1 or 2 violins and write a book on how to build violins.  Seems to be how things are often done todayas well.  I am only 1 or 2 fiddles away from writting my tome on violin luthiery.  Now I need a title.  Maybe "Making "The" Violin".

No, actually, making snap judgements based on minimal facts is "how it's done today." Read the fine print.  Don't worry, it's not Victorian English.  ;)

image.jpeg

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