Sign in to follow this  
Brad H

Hold-HeetGlue Pot Temperature

Recommended Posts

I just bought a Hold Heet glue pot and, on first use, see that the temperature of the water bath is 160deg.   I thought 145 deg. was optimum?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, thanks for the suggestion.   I don't know why I assumed that all contents inside the water bath would stabilize at the same temperature.  It looks like it -the glue - is between 140 - 150.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Brad H said:

Now up to 164 deg.

 

Edit:  Seems to have stabilized at 162 deg.

I have a small pot purchased from Walmart. I found that, after adjusting the dial to the lowest setting, I still have to put in the water and wait at least a half hour for the temp to stabilize before I add the glue pot.. The problem is that the temperature sensor in the bottom of the unit is not close enough to the water. The same thing is probably happening to your unit. Except you can't take the glue out, right? So I don't really have an answer for you. I just know the cause. The temp. sensor is not close enough to the water. Does the Hold Heat unit have a pot inside of a pot?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, David Burgess said:

The thermostat is easily accessible and adjustable by taking the unit apart (removal of two screws, if I remember correctly), if you decide you need or want to go that route.

Thanks for that info.  After the revelation that the glue itself is under 150 deg., I feel much better about the glue pot.  In fact, I now have a pretty good idea why I have struggled with having glue gel too quickly in the past.  My last pot had an adjustable thermostat which I adjusted so that water temp was around 140...the glue might have been 125(?) and not hot enough, especially during the winter.

John, yes, the pot has a removable pot. 

gue pot.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Brad H said:

OK, thanks for the suggestion.   I don't know why I assumed that all contents inside the water bath would stabilize at the same temperature.  It looks like it -the glue - is between 140 - 150.

Just a thought, have you checked the accuracy of your thermometer?  I guess I have calibration trust issues so I test the accuracy of anything I use for measurements.  It is easy to put in a glass of ice water to test how accurate it is at 0 C or 32 F, and in boiling water at 100 C or 212 F (at 1 ATM).

-Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best way to start is to have a microwave in the shop for preheating water and a small hot plate to hold temperature. International Violin sells a small glue set with a small hot plate and vial with a brush, works great!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is What you need  you can turn the thermostat all the way up to get to temp quickly, then back off to the level of your choice. My Hold Heat sits in the corner now. In addition, you can fall back on bikini waxing if times get tough.  When checking a thermometer with boiling water, don't forget altitude too. -2 degrees per 1000' above sea level. Water boils at 199 in my shop.WIN_20170201_17_11_05_Pro.thumb.jpg.2b7af2b9ad39dd182bccbac32cc7a54b.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, David Farmer said:

When checking a thermometer with boiling water, don't forget altitude too. -2 degrees per 1000' above sea level. Water boils at 199 in my shop

Don't forget the hardness too - hard water boils at up to 2 degrees higher temperature than the distilled one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, ireland_fish said:

Do you put water in the pot between outer and inter pot( the removable one)? Thanks Dan

Absolutely. The water does a couple things: It provides even heat all around the glue vessel, it also provides some thermal mass to stabilize the temperature variations between the on and off times of the heating element.

My homemade glue pot has a third benefit to the water: I use a porcelain custard dish for the glue vessel, sitting in the water bath. Because the glue heating pot is a little deeper, the lid covers both the water bath and glue, which maintains a very humid condition that helps keep the glue from dehydrating and thickening.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our Hold Heet just started to go last week. We knew something was up when it started throwing the breaker in the outlet. I transferred it to a power strip, fired it up and took the temperature of the water. Steam was coming out of the pot when the lid was removed and the temp was over 170 F and climbing. I found a reasonably priced second hand replacement and it's on it's way. The last time I had one go out I had the factory in Chicago rebuild it. I called them this week and their phone number had been disconnected, not sure if they're still in business, but I see plenty of people offering new Hold Heet glue pots for sale.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of arrangements will work, if one is just getting into luthiery a dedicated glue pot is likely an unnecessary expense and your funds are better spent on quality carving tools, etc. Any type of double boiler arrangement where you can specifically control the temperature should do (provided it's reasonably safe and reliable.) A Hold Heet (or other quality-made similar product) is a good investment in a shop environment or if you're in it for the long haul. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/19/2017 at 8:26 PM, Brad H said:

I just bought a Hold Heet glue pot and, on first use, see that the temperature of the water bath is 160deg.   I thought 145 deg. was optimum?

I haven't noticed that that differences in glue temperatures, from 145 to 160. are anything to obsess about. Higher glue temperatures may give marginally more working time, but a lot more depends on the temperature of the working environment.

A "hot room" (rather like a moist sauna) can be really valuable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Woodland said:

 A Hold Heet (or other quality-made similar product) is a good investment in a shop environment or if you're in it for the long haul. 

Disagree. Complete waste of money :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Woodland said:

Lots of arrangements will work, if one is just getting into luthiery a dedicated glue pot is likely an unnecessary expense and your funds are better spent on quality carving tools, etc. Any type of double boiler arrangement where you can specifically control the temperature should do (provided it's reasonably safe and reliable.) A Hold Heet (or other quality-made similar product) is a good investment in a shop environment or if you're in it for the long haul. 

I have two of them that have worked well daily for decades....hard to find that consistency with anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every shop I've worked in for the past 48 years has used these and I've never thought of using anything else. I made a top so I can fill the large pot with water and suspend small glass tumblers into the water to hold the glue and another  hole to access the water for clean up or warming tools. I think I had to rewire mine at some point but other wise it has worked great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My own glue pot needed a rebuild at around 10 years, our shop pot lasted almost 20. 

I see Herdim makes one for $200-$300, it appears to be adjustable. I think $150 for a new Hold Heet is plenty to spend and well worth it in the long run, but I also don't blame people for making do with another arrangement that works well enough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Woodland said:

My own glue pot needed a rebuild at around 10 years, our shop pot lasted almost 20. 

I see Herdim makes one for $200-$300, it appears to be adjustable. I think $150 for a new Hold Heet is plenty to spend and well worth it in the long run, but I also don't blame people for making do with another arrangement that works well enough.

Since you are talking about prices. Get a pot to warm Japanese sake. Cheaper than those designed for violin makers and absolutely sufficient.

my quick search found this 

 

https://www.amazon.com/TWINBIRD-Japanese-Electric-Portable-TW-D418B/dp/B0169RUVK6/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?crid=3DWXACPEJT58I&keywords=sake+warmer&qid=1556976020&s=gateway&sprefix=sake+&sr=8-3

 

but there are pots with a better grip.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.