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Influence of cap iron on hand planes


Luis Martins
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Yes, cap iron position matters a lot. It can effectively vary the affects between a low-angle plane, and a high-angle plane, depending on the position of the cap (or whatever you want to call it).

But I also think that rigidity in a plane shouldn't be ignored. I planed a couple of cello plates flat today, using my blueprinted  and highly massaged old Bailey plane, to get things into  reasonable shape .  Used an "off the shelf" Lie Nielson plane to clean it up, not that I didn't pay a lot of attention to sharpening the blade.

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14 minutes ago, Luis Martins said:

Do any of you know were to find information, as clear as in this video is, about blade angle and its consequences on the smoothness of the cut? Cant seem to find good literature or videos...

Pitches and uses:

20° and under -- Used for low angle planes such as mitre planes, shoulder planes and block planes. The blades for these planes are used with the bevel up, which has the effect of increasing the overall pitch by the amount of the bevel angle. As these planes are usually used for end grain work, having a lower angle with the blade supported right to the tip and a fine mouth opening is a major advantage.

45° (Common Pitch) -- Used for most bench planes, from wooden bodied ones to Stanley/Bailey type. A bedding angle set at 45° is optimum for most softwoods and straight grained hardwoods and the blade is used with the bevel down, requiring a chipbreaker in most cases (especially when using a thinner blade). Japanese style planes don't need a chipbreaker because the blades are usually quite thick.

50° (York Pitch) -- Used for hardwoods and is especially useful for highly figured and interlocking grain. Also used for rebate (rabbet) planes and some grooving planes.

55° (Middle Pitch) -- Mainly used for moulding planes for softwoods.

60° (Half Pitch) -- Used for moulding planes for hardwood.

70° to 90° -- Used for toothing planes, side snipers and side rebate (rabbet) planes.

90° plus -- Scrapers and scraping planes.

from: http://www.handplane.com/45/perfect-pitch-bedding-angles-explained/

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12 minutes ago, Luis Martins said:

Do any of you know were to find information, as clear as in this video is, about blade angle and its consequences on the smoothness of the cut? Cant seem to find good literature or videos...

There was an entire web site on this but I don't seem to find it. Maybe my google-ing is weak. In my very limited experience sharpness beats angle by a long shot.

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