Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Certificates of Authenticity


Don Noon
 Share

Recommended Posts

It has been suggested to me that a well-prepared certificate of authenticity should accompany my instruments in order to appeal to the higher level client.

Is that common for most upper level makers?  How many of you do it?  If so, do you make them up yourself or have someone else prepare it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dunno...but I just purchased a different item that came with a certificate of authenticity...and I thought it was a nice item to have.

Anything can be forged though...not sure how a certificate...if everyone provided one...ends up being much different than a label...and look what's happened to the value of those!  LOL...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, Don Noon said:

It has been suggested to me that a well-prepared certificate of authenticity should accompany my instruments in order to appeal to the higher level client.

Is that common for most upper level makers?  How many of you do it?  If so, do you make them up yourself or have someone else prepare it?

Yourself being the maker, surely the buyer is at ease with the authenticity of the violin. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, carl stross said:

Yourself being the maker, surely the buyer is at ease with the authenticity of the violin. 

People like free stuff, swank, and bling.  A fancy certificate and a "I Play a Don Noon Violin" baseball cap--how cool is that? B)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, Wolfjk said:

Perhaps a handwritten certificate with your signature is the best and quickest way?

Again...that, alone, can easily be forged.  But I do like the idea regardless.

I think you need photographs as well, and other information.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, it is a good idea, I make them. Some insurance companies will ask for them, as well as a letter of the maker declaring the current value of the instrument.

First make photos of the top, back, f hole, front and side view of the scroll (I use about 6 photos). I use drawing paper and make a kind of book with it, using ribbons to keep the pages together.  I glue a printed description of the instrument in the first internal page, followed by the photos. Send the digital photos to the player too, he may need them in the future.

INSTRUMENT: VIOLA.

MODEL: ANDREA GUARNERI

YEAR: XXXX20

Com motto: “Tempesta”

Label

                                                         LUIS CLAUDIO MANFIO

      Fecit in XXXX

          In XXXXX

 

DESCRIPTION OF THE INSTRUMENT

TABLE:  two-piece table of spruce with even fine grain.

BACK:one-piece back of maple with  medium deep  flames, slab cut, wth two wings added to the lower bouts, very beautifull.   

RIBS: in maple similar to that of the back.  

SCROLL: in maple with medium flames.

BACK LENGTH: 16 inches (40.7 cms).

Inner construction: willow blocks, Spanish cedar linings.

Varnish: oil varnish, red/brown over a golden yellow ground.

 

I sign every page of it and brand them with a cold branding iron.

And, Yes, it takes some time and patience.....  it is good when you sell quickly and have no time to make the photos!!!

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think microchip technology like they use in pets would be a good idea.  A scanner can pick up a registry number from the chip which can be linked to whatever information you want, including a history of ownership and repairs.  The maker can put the chip (about the size of a grain of rice) in a hidden and inconvenient place to remove such as one of the blocks. 

-Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

53 minutes ago, Jim Bress said:

I think microchip technology like they use in pets would be a good idea.  A scanner can pick up a registry number from the chip which can be linked to whatever information you want, including a history of ownership and repairs.  The maker can put the chip (about the size of a grain of rice) in a hidden and inconvenient place to remove such as one of the blocks. 

-Jim

Jim, I am quite sure there was somebody years ago advertising that sort of technology for musical instruments. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, carl stross said:

Jim, I am quite sure there was somebody years ago advertising that sort of technology for musical instruments. 

Yup, there are still companies advertising microchips for theft recovery.  I was just voicing my opinion that it's a good idea and could be used to document provenance and any other useful information as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Certificates are most useful in documenting authenticity of antique instruments, IMO.  If you are shelling out big bucks you want to know that what you are buying is what it is supposed to be.  The trouble is, how much can you trust a certificate?  If I recall, Arnold Steinhardt's violin, now believed to be a cut down Storioni viola, is labelled as a Guarneri del Gesu and may even be certified as such.  And then there are numerous fakes that fooled some expert(s) who certified an instrument as something that it is now thought to be something else.  I think the certificates are perhaps most important for people who buy instruments (and bows) as investments.  The certificate might make it easier to get a good price when they sell.  A concert player would, perhaps, be more concerned with how the instrument works for him or her.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...