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Greg F.

modern makers question

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Among modern makers (active in the 1970s, 80s, 90s, etc.) that are no longer with us, which ones have seen the most dramatic increases in the value/opinion of their instruments?  Values adjusted in some nebulous way for inflation and opinions being...well, opinions.

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Sacconi comes to mind as doing well at Tarisio's.  I don't know if he was active in the 70's, but that's the time period he passed away.  Interesting question.  The followup question for the names who's instruments have had a large increase is why.

-Jim

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Poggi. Back in the 70's a Poggi violin cost was about the same of an air ticket Sao Paulo/Rome...  well, if you sell a Poggi today you can make that trip at least 120 times!

 

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Sacconi died in 1973.  I don't know for sure that he was not making near the end, but I suspect he was not because he said he was involved in finishing up his book.

Another maker that shot up astronomically was the Chicago maker Franz Kinberg.  I don't know current prices but the last price I heard over ten years ago was $80,000.

The Beckers kept going up steadily while Carl Jr. was alive.  I don't know what the situation is now.  

I think one of the guys that will continue to grow is the Italian Ferdinando Garimberti.  Last I heard they were $100,000.

IMO, the real test of a maker is if his violins go up steadily after he dies, because all makers can promote their instruments while they live.  Afterwards the violins stand on their own merit. 

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10 hours ago, Greg F. said:

  Values adjusted in some nebulous way for inflation and opinions being...well, opinions.

I don't understand why otherwise well-informed people keep on insisting that inflation has anything at all to do with the price of violins, all obvious evidence to the contrary.   Supply and demand are the modern makers' closest friends.  As the already limited supply of the old Italians continues its inevitable decline, it allows the moderns to raise their prices.  IOW, just like trendy real estate in a growing city, it's only limited by supply and demand, occasionally leavened by a simple dose of common sense.

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7 hours ago, LeMaster said:

I don't understand why otherwise well-informed people keep on insisting that inflation has anything at all to do with the price of violins, all obvious evidence to the contrary.   Supply and demand are the modern makers' closest friends.  As the already limited supply of the old Italians continues its inevitable decline, it allows the moderns to raise their prices.  IOW, just like trendy real estate in a growing city, it's only limited by supply and demand, occasionally leavened by a simple dose of common sense.

The fine art market in general has seen prices rise significantly above the general rate of inflation. From an economics point of view, this is not surprising considering that the planet's wealthiest individuals are also the ones who have experienced the greatest percentage increase in wealth in the last 30 years. Hence, there are more discretionary dollars to spend on expensive items that the other 99% of us can only gaze at in museums.

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10 hours ago, Will L said:

Sacconi died in 1973.  I don't know for sure that he was not making near the end, but I suspect he was not because he said he was involved in finishing up his book.

Another maker that shot up astronomically was the Chicago maker Franz Kinberg.  I don't know current prices but the last price I heard over ten years ago was $80,000.

The Beckers kept going up steadily while Carl Jr. was alive.  I don't know what the situation is now.  

I think one of the guys that will continue to grow is the Italian Ferdinando Garimberti.  Last I heard they were $100,000.

IMO, the real test of a maker is if his violins go up steadily after he dies, because all makers can promote their instruments while they live.  Afterwards the violins stand on their own merit. 

Thanks for the post and especially the names.   

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You are welcome.

I have not played a Garimberti, but there is a good illustrated book of his work.  If they play as well as they look then I'd think seriously about buying one.

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Carl Becker (1919-2013)

Luiz Bellini (1935-2015)

Gadda (Mario?  Gaetano?)

Ferdinando Garimberti  (1894-1982)

Franz Kinberg

Poggi (1893-1984)

Sacconi (1895-1973)

Others?  Any boomers who died relatively young?

 

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