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Could anyone help me find out where's this violin from?


Leoband81
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Full-length front, side, and back photos as well as close-ups of the neck root/heel/button area would be nice.  From what I can see, it's a rather plain looking 19th. Century Saxon violin, probably from the Markneukirchen area. which has had some work done to it at some time.  It's what's known as a "trade" violin, and there's no chance of linking it to a maker or shop unless there's inscriptions somewhere inside from a maker or a repairer. :)

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3 hours ago, Violadamore said:

 From what I can see, it's a rather plain looking 19th. Century Saxon violin

I feel sorry to disagree once more;), but what I'm seeing is that the scroll front looks like to be fluted deeply, possibly to the bitter end, a very unsaxon feature; otherwise I agree that we need to see what you're referring to. Could be something from the austrian or south bohemian region.

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8 hours ago, Blank face said:

I feel sorry to disagree once more;), but what I'm seeing is that the scroll front looks like to be fluted deeply, possibly to the bitter end, a very unsaxon feature; otherwise I agree that we need to see what you're referring to. Could be something from the austrian or south bohemian region.

The corners look built-on-back, and the scroll heel has a "delta", but until we see the neck root area, the entire neck could be an addition anyway, or the violin could predate mass production.  I called it on the BOB, to start with. :P

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26 minutes ago, Violadamore said:

BrCorner001.jpgBrCorner002.jpg Close enough to the edge for you? :)

No-_-.

Methodologically:

Belly corners are telling you nothing, cause they get easily closer with shrinking and wear. All visible corners have a different overstand, while there seems to be a longer corner overstand at the bottom.

If close, then too close to call.

Once more, I don't say you're definitely wrong, just that we can't tell actually.

Franc is close to what I would call "South Bohemia".

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7 minutes ago, Blank face said:

Another misleading call, Juzek ain't "middle", but Dutzend and nothing else.(where's the "pedantic" emoticon? Updated?:angry:)

Lighten up, and smell the sarcasm. :lol:  You made a good point about top and bottom corner overstands, but I feel that we're only arguing about what species of rubbish it is. :)

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Thanks for the photos.  I was emphatically wrong, your fiddle was made on an inside mold and is probably something-or-other South German, late 18th. Century or early 19th..  Please post photos of the neck attachment point. the entire neck and back, and a close-up of the bottom of the violin centered on the endpin hole.  Thank you. :)

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I still cannot see the rib joints clearly enough, but I see the other things: for example, I see the soundpost crack right above the soundpost located too east. And, some weird things: seems that the bushings of the small holes are bigger than the bushings of the big ones. I cannot imagine how it is possible to do that at all. OK, maybe photos lie, and the holes have same diameter, hence, the bushings have been made from straight, not tapered dowel, which is more likely. Scratched line of the graft is not something unusual, but it is silly that the line goes across the bushing (6. picture).

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22 hours ago, franciscus said:

I still cannot see the rib joints clearly enough, but I see the other things: for example, I see the soundpost crack right above the soundpost located too east. And, some weird things: seems that the bushings of the small holes are bigger than the bushings of the big ones. I cannot imagine how it is possible to do that at all. OK, maybe photos lie, and the holes have same diameter, hence, the bushings have been made from straight, not tapered dowel, which is more likely. Scratched line of the graft is not something unusual, but it is silly that the line goes across the bushing (6. picture).

If the original pegs had the old 1:20 taper, and the holes were bushed and fitted with pegs at the modern 1:30, that is exactly what will happen.

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2 hours ago, Jacob said:

If the original pegs had the old 1:20 taper, and the holes were bushed and fitted with pegs at the modern 1:30, that is exactly what will happen.

How I see it, it looks rather like someone changed the taper from 1:30 to more aggressive steep of 1:20, where I cannot see the sense. But, some of the pictures confused me because it seemed to me that the bushiig has bigger diameter on the small side, and I could not imagine how to do that with the usual tapered reamer. The picture fooled me, I suppose.

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On 12/01/2017 at 4:14 AM, Violadamore said:

Thanks for the photos.  I was emphatically wrong, your fiddle was made on an inside mold and is probably something-or-other South German, late 18th. Century or early 19th..  Please post photos of the neck attachment point. the entire neck and back, and a close-up of the bottom of the violin centered on the endpin hole.  Thank you. :)

Hello, Viola, how are you? Thanks for all your posts!

i was making a research and I found some similarities with the Gagliano family. Despite their awesome violins, there are some very simple which match some features of this one, or am I going too far?

http://tarisio.com/cozio-archive/property/?ID=40456

 

 

IMG_3195.PNG

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