Started on my violin cradle


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12 hours ago, David Burgess said:

Bring on your mallet and gouge, and I'll race ya. :)

I actually tried chucking a gouge in a pneumatic impact hammer once. Didn't give any improvement in speed, and made the most horrendous noise. :lol:

Can't remember whether or not Jeffrey was working there when I tried that. Must have been torture for the other guys in the shop!

Thank you, I assume that means there is no real reason to not use a chisel, just that it is not any better than not using it and potentially worse.

Frank

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3 hours ago, FrankNichols said:

Thank you, I assume that means there is no real reason to not use a chisel, just that it is not any better than not using it and potentially worse.

Frank

A hammer and chisel? Decidedly worse, if one has some skill with a roughing gouge, and needs to make a living at it. I'll bet 500 bucks that I can rough out a top or back in half the time (or less) compared to someone using a hammer and chisel. And I'm perfectly willing to put that to the test at the next VSA Convention, despite being old enough to be eligible for retirement and Social Security benefits. :)

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Update. Just finished the gouging, planing, and scraping of the cradle dish.

Just need to finish the clamps, and pretty her up a bit. And make the swivel. Glad that part is out of the way!

Fits my violin perfectly too! No rocking ANYWHERE. Super stoked for my first go in violin making! Learned a ton along the way.

Thanks everyone. Will post more updates as they come.

0109172113.jpg

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1 hour ago, Wilgeo said:

Anyone have an opinion on what to use to glue cork to wood? 

I use a contact adhesive like Pattex or Bostik, not a very traditional glue but works perfectly and with no clamping.

You only have to lightly hammer the cork during gluing to assure a perfect bond (advanced shoemaker tecniqueB))

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24 minutes ago, Davide Sora said:

I use a contact adhesive like Pattex or Bostik, not a very traditional glue but works perfectly and with no clamping.

You only have to lightly hammer the cork during gluing to assure a perfect bond (advanced shoemaker tecniqueB))

Perfect. Thank you Davide!

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45 minutes ago, Mark Caudle said:

In my opinion the fat bit near the blade is not a good idea as it is likely to catch the work if you finish the gouge stroke at a low angle.

I never have had that problem, Mark.  My guess would be because of the crank in the gouge itself.  It ensures that I am always pushing from a higher angle to get the gouge to bite.  You may have a good point, though, with a more conventional gouge.  Probably why Maitre Burgess doesn't have such a feature on his. :)

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4 hours ago, Davide Sora said:

Nothing, bare wood.

 

Hi David - I made my support out of some ply with the centre cut out (saving the "outcut" for other uses) and was going to stick some cork around the edges.

I had occasion to take a pair of shoes in for repair and at the back of the shoemaker's shop I saw a whole pile of tanned hides. I thought that leather might just be kinder than cork and asked about some offcuts. We chatted a bit and I walked out some $3 poorer with a complete sheepskin hide.

Works well - keeps the shavings from falling through the hole. Maybe I should take a pic of an umpopulated suppport.

cheers edi

 

DSC00076.JPG

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5 hours ago, edi malinaric said:

Hi David - I made my support out of some ply with the centre cut out (saving the "outcut" for other uses) and was going to stick some cork around the edges.

I had occasion to take a pair of shoes in for repair and at the back of the shoemaker's shop I saw a whole pile of tanned hides. I thought that leather might just be kinder than cork and asked about some offcuts. We chatted a bit and I walked out some $3 poorer with a complete sheepskin hide.

Works well - keeps the shavings from falling through the hole. Maybe I should take a pic of an umpopulated suppport.

cheers edi

Leather should be fine if you deal with varnished surface, but with bare wood arching a bare wood cradle for me is better.

With dark tanned hide or leather you could run the risk of contaminating and stain the bare white wood, natural leather would be probably a better choice.

However, the surface is smooth, pleasantly supple and does not retain the chips, and that's fine.

The same goes for varnished or treated cradle, without the advantage of the suppleness of the surface.

With bare wood there is the great advantage of being able to fit the cradle to any higher or fuller arching with only a few shots of scraper.

If your hide cover is glued to the cradle this work may be troublesome......

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8 hours ago, Davide Sora said:

Leather should be fine if you deal with varnished surface, but with bare wood arching a bare wood cradle for me is better.

With dark tanned hide or leather you could run the risk of contaminating and stain the bare white wood, natural leather would be probably a better choice.

However, the surface is smooth, pleasantly supple and does not retain the chips, and that's fine.

The same goes for varnished or treated cradle, without the advantage of the suppleness of the surface.

With bare wood there is the great advantage of being able to fit the cradle to any higher or fuller arching with only a few shots of scraper.

If your hide cover is glued to the cradle this work may be troublesome......

Hi Davide - thank you for those comments.

I did monitor the dye transfer to the wood and can report that there was none.

I never thought about having to modify the cradle for different archings - if it ever becomes necessary I'll just modify the "bottom" of the cradle to suit and then skin that side as well. (quick thought - "Now add some drones and a chanter to the edge of the plywood and have a ready-to use bagpipe for when times are quiet")

cheers edi

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9 hours ago, edi malinaric said:

Hi Davide - thank you for those comments.

I did monitor the dye transfer to the wood and can report that there was none.

I never thought about having to modify the cradle for different archings - if it ever becomes necessary I'll just modify the "bottom" of the cradle to suit and then skin that side as well. (quick thought - "Now add some drones and a chanter to the edge of the plywood and have a ready-to use bagpipe for when times are quiet")

cheers edi

I had not realized that the skin was only on the boundary edge, I thought that covered the entire cradle....:rolleyes:

 

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6 hours ago, Davide Sora said:

I had not realized that the skin was only on the boundary edge, I thought that covered the entire cradle....:rolleyes:

 

Hi Davide - no - I used the complete hide - it covers the cutout in the middle. I'll take a picture of the front and back of the cradle and post it - tomorrow.

 

cheers edi

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IMG_0179.JPGI'm using this form made from hard foam insulation. It's cheap and very quick to make. I have a wooden base for it, but the easiest thing to do is glue it to a thin wooden backer and drop in some pegs so it can be used as a bench stop.

I have boards on my bench that pull out like you see on some old desks for a writing surface, and I place the cradle on this board and can work all the way around 3 sides. That comes in handy when looking for the right angle to plane or scrap figured backs. 

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