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Need help identifying age and origin of a violin


RueDeRome96
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Hello,

 

I am trying to identify the age and provenance of a violin I purchased 20 years ago in Paris. There are no markings except for an inscription (unless it is just scratches...) on the button, that reads "11/11"

 

The dimensions are not that of a modern standard violin:

 

Length of back: 356 mm

Body stop: 198 mm

Neck stop: 135 mm

 

Body width:

Front - 163 mm

Inner - 108 mm

Back - 207 mm

 

Thanks in advance for your help.

 

SM_IMG_0076.jpg SM_IMG_0082.jpg SM_IMG_0083.jpg SM_IMG_0087.jpg SM_IMG_0088.jpg

 

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Jacob,

You have probably explained this a dozen times but what distinguishes pre WW1 and after WW1?

Thanks,

Anything but an exact science, rather the appearance of the generation that went over from “Dutzendarbeit” in their own private shed, to working in a more industrial “large workshop/small factory” sort of style.

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Thank you for your replies.

 

It was not sold to me as anything extraordinary, just as an early 20th century beginner study violin, so this is all very consistent.

 

I become interested in the origin because of the dimension. To the uneducated, online resources seem to imply that there is a linear progression from Baroque to Classic/Transitional to Modern dimensions. I was therefore curious to know why a modern violin would have dimensions that seem to be associated with the Classic era.

 

I am assuming that the progression was anything but linear and that modern standards are a very recent concept. Is that correct?

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I become interested in the origin because of the dimension. To the uneducated, online resources seem to imply that there is a linear progression from Baroque to Classic/Transitional to Modern dimensions. I was therefore curious to know why a modern violin would have dimensions that seem to be associated with the Classic era.

 

I am assuming that the progression was anything but linear and that modern standards are a very recent concept. Is that correct?

That is a strange idea. Dimensions can be useful in associating certain violins with certain makers, cities, and regions, as one part of a much larger set of observations, but taken alone don't have much meaning, The idea that dimensions somehow evolved with time and that one might associate them with specific time periods seems to fly in the face of any minimal observation of existing identified violins. What about your violin's measurements do you find of the "Classic era?" The stop is a little on the long side, and the neck a bit longer than it needs to be to accomodate that (if you're measuring body to nut), but nothing radical there. Back length and bout widths are all in the ball park for a "Strad-ish inspired" model. 

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