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Greg F.

Some pics of ancient violinists

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#6 is Roman Totenberg.  I saved that photo, so I can show it to the next know-it-all who suggests that I loosen my bow  :lol: .

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#6 is Roman Totenberg.  I saved that photo, so I can show it to the next know-it-all who suggests that I loosen my bow  :lol: .

I don't think it's too tight; it looks completely loose to me.

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#6 is Roman Totenberg.  I saved that photo, so I can show it to the next know-it-all who suggests that I loosen my bow  :lol: .

Very good.  Did the hint help?

 

That leaves #9 on my list and the one Addie posted.

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Bridgetower?

Interesting guess, but no... 

 

Hint 1:  This portrait is said to be in the National Portrait Gallery, London.

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More hints:

 

Violinist, composer, and publisher.  Royal trumpeter.

 

His father's portrait is often used to illustrate the Baroque violin playing style.

 

He played the music for this noteworthy event:

 

 

post-35343-0-16338200-1478640524_thumb.jpg

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More hints:

 

Violinist, composer, and publisher.  Royal trumpeter.

 

His father's portrait is often used to illustrate the Baroque violin playing style.

 

He played the music for this noteworthy event:

Ok, another guess.  Son of Geminiani.

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Not really fair, since the image is not widely known, and the only other likeness is an oil painting that is now lost, and survives as a poor hand tinted photo.

 

The subject is Nathaniel Gow, son of Niel Gow.

 

The dance was noteworthy: it was the first quadrille danced at Almacks, and represents to many the death of the native country dances as a popular pastime.

 

http://www.electricscotland.com/history/other/gow_nathaniel.htm

 

http://imslp.org/wiki/Category:Gow,_Nathaniel

 

nathaniel.jpg

 

Hear Nathaniel's violin by Ruddiman

 

 

 

Paul Anderson can trace his teaching lineage back to Niel Gow.

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Not really fair, since the image is not widely known, and the only other likeness is an oil painting that is now lost, and survives as a poor hand tinted photo.

 

The subject is Nathaniel Gow, son of Niel Gow.

 

The dance was noteworthy: it was the first quadrille danced at Almacks, and represents to many the death of the native country dances as a popular pastime.

 

http://www.electricscotland.com/history/other/gow_nathaniel.htm

 

http://imslp.org/wiki/Category:Gow,_Nathaniel

 

nathaniel.jpg

 

Hear Nathaniel's violin by Ruddiman

 

 

 

Paul Anderson can trace his teaching lineage back to Niel Gow.

Way beyond my knowledge base, but thanks for the quiz.

 

Re #9 on my list, there is a modern player of (nearly) the same name.   But to rap this up I'll give the answer:  Anatol Kaminsky.

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My first guess is it might be George Bridgetower, the most famous "Afro-European" violinist of his day.  But now I see that it's already been given.  Still looks slightly like Bridgetower, and his is a name which shouldn't be forgotten.  Anatoly Kaminsky is new to me.

 

No one can imagine the trouble I had with the racist spell checker which kept changing Bridgetower to Bridgetown.  Harrumph.   :)

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