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Davide Sora

G.B.Guadagnini 1773 ex Buckeburg

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Hi all.

I was looking for information on this G.B.Guadagnini violin, such as photos, books and possibly arching and thicknesses.

I can not find anything, apart from the fact that it was in use at the Italian violinist Francesco Manara, and is now in use at Korean violinist Soyoung Yoon, winner of the Wieniawski competition in 2011.

Does anyone has any information on this violin ?

Amazing sound, you can hear her playing the opening concert of the Wieniawski competition taking place these days.

 

https://youtu.be/ZYZcHqKd2Ng?t=24m22s

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 Davide, clips like this used to wow me, but not anymore. I wonder if the fact that so many great moderns are being produced is part of the equation. I would be curious to know what you think.

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Nice video... there are so many extreme close ups in HD with varying angles and light reflections, I think you can get a pretty good feel for the shape of the top arching.  I was even studying the cut of the bridge, which looks a bit unusual.  And I noticed she uses an A string fine tuner.

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That is an excellent video. Picture and sound quality both.

While I listened...I looked around...lol. The first bassoonist has an odd embouchure.

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 Davide, clips like this used to wow me, but not anymore. I wonder if the fact that so many great moderns are being produced is part of the equation. I would be curious to know what you think.

 

I have heard this violin only in recordings of this type, but whenever I hear something that strikes me I am inclined to want to find out how it is made from a constructive point of view, to understand how and if it differs from my violins.

Other Guadagnini struck me, but others do not, and I think it's important to start from things we like without taking for granted the quality according to the name they bear.

Of course I agree with you that many great modern violin can compete with this sound quality, but knowing your "enemy" gives some more chance to win the battle... :) 

In the case of this recording, it is very interesting because it can be compared with many other made the same way and in the same context, with several ancient violins (guarneris, montagnana, testore, ceruti and others) and also some modern to compare, although played by different people.

All stages of the competition are recorded and can be listened on youtube, also in streaming, an interesting exercise.

 

https://www.youtube.com/user/WieniawskiHenryk/videos

 

And the streaming :

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WB-Av6_sqDM

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Nice video... there are so many extreme close ups in HD with varying angles and light reflections, I think you can get a pretty good feel for the shape of the top arching.  I was even studying the cut of the bridge, which looks a bit unusual.  And I noticed she uses an A string fine tuner.

 

.....and you can also use the slow motion function of google, as well as the still image..... B) :ph34r:

Despite my efforts I could not read the stamp of the bridge, but by the features I may hazard to guess Florian Leonhard.

What do you think that is unusual in the bridge cutting?

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I just sat down to have a sip of tea, and wasn't planning on watching the whole concerto....but I did...wow!  You usually hear the Kreisler cadenza, but this one was quite nice too (I wonder if the soloist wrote it).  You really notice how well even the pizzacato notes resonate and project.  It would be interesting to know how it was recorded...but in some moments like in the rondo, the soloist holds a high note while the orchestra comes in quite loud, and this violin still screams over it all...I think that's hard to "add-in".  I got the feeling from this recording that this particular instrument must feel unlimited in what it can put out.

 

It may be safe to say as well, that the string heights (they looked to be right at the high end of the spectrum) may be contributing to the "oomph" or "grunt" the violin can put out.  The robust tone on the low strings during the big cadenza when she's playing right up by the bridge, to my ears, is just about perfect for this kind of music.

 

Very enjoyable...thanks for posting  :)

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How many of the best Stradivari, Guarneri Del Gesu, Guadanini, etc. have survived without having their plates thinned or otherwise messed with?  I always hear about how hard it is to find a Del Gesu that has not been thinned.  This comment is entirely without benefit of real scholarship and only a combination of conversations with other pilgrims.

 

DLB

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It would be interesting to know how it was recorded...

Wonderful playing and wonderful tone but this is very much a modern multi-track recording. You can see the Schoeps mics placed throughout the orchestra and though you don't see it in the video, the violin sounds spot mic'd to me, perhaps with an overhead.

*Update - At 36:32 you can see what appears to be the main stereo pair and another pair for the soloist. I'm not trying to take anything away from the recording, it's wonderful, it just doesn't necessary represent the reality the audience heard.

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To be honest, I don't think it's anything worth writing home. At least not based on this example.  

 

Since my ear isn't nearly honed enough (to anything other than overall clarity of sound)...why?

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Amazing sound, you can hear her playing the opening concert of the Wieniawski competition taking place these days.

It is A string fine tuner, that is doing the job, joking of course.

 

Don't forget, that the bow takes a part of at least 50% of the overall sound generation. You should ask her, what is a bow too.

 

And the players right hand structure near the thumb influence the timbre too.

So try to copy that, if you can...

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It is A string fine tuner, that is doing the job, joking of course.

 

Don't forget, that the bow takes a part of at least 50% of the overall sound generation. You should ask her, what is a bow too.

 

And the players right hand structure near the thumb influence the timbre too.

So try to copy that, if you can...

 

...and the player's tecnique is worth another 40%, so I think it will be easy to just get the remaining 10%.........wait, I forgot the A tuner, so another 5% went off, all that remains is the last 5% attributable to violin making, so the task of the maker will be overly easy...... :D :D

 

I still do not understand why someone is so determined to spend so much money in these instruments....... 

 

In any case I have stubbornly refused to make copies, so my task still remains difficult, unfortunately. <_<

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...and the player's tecnique is worth another 40%, so I think it will be easy to just get the remaining 10%.........wait, I forgot the A tuner, so another 5% went off, all that remains is the last 5% attributable to violin making, so the task of the maker will be overly easy...... :D :D

 

I still do not understand why someone is so determined to spend so much money in these instruments....... :rolleyes:

 

 Wait, the A tuner only 5 %?! What a big letdown... I was saving up for a diamond studded gold-plated platinum A tuner... And I was told that fine tuners account for up to 20% of the instrument's sound... :(

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 Wait, the A tuner only 5 %?! What a big letdown... I was saving up for a diamond studded gold-plated platinum A tuner... And I was told that fine tuners account for up to 20% of the instrument's sound... :(

 Right, but if you do use four tuners, so is 5% per tuner... ;)

All adds up. :) 

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What do you think that is unusual in the bridge cutting?

 

The legs look very thick and stiff, with no trimming off of the bottom.  Perhaps high kidneys?  The ends (hips?) look blocky, like they have been trimmed off.  Also, the feet have very long inside extensions, but the outside is cut off very short.

post-25192-0-20634900-1476722686_thumb.jpgpost-25192-0-93111100-1476723355_thumb.jpg

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I still do not understand why someone is so determined to spend so much money in these instruments....... 

Because they can afford.

Because it is investment.

Because it is business for someone.

Because some of them like to lend their instruments to someone who can play, but who can't buy such instruments.

Ask Fidlecollector why he need a several E. Sartory bows for example...

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I still do not understand why someone is so determined to spend so much money in these instruments....... 

 

 

Guadagnini is the big name these days.

Funny, seems like only last year it was Pressenda.

But ultimately it has to be acknowledged that Pressenda just doesn't have as many syllables as Guadagnini ...

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But ultimately it has to be acknowledged that Pressenda just doesn't have as many syllables as Guadagnini ...

 

I'm in big trouble.

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The legs look very thick and stiff, with no trimming off of the bottom.  Perhaps high kidneys?  The ends (hips?) look blocky, like they have been trimmed off.

attachicon.gifBridge.jpgattachicon.gifBridge 2.jpg

I am a little troubled with the terminology of the parts of the bridge, but it seems to me that the goal is to leave the neck of feet very outward.

Maybe using a wider bridge reducing it on the sides to achieve this effect.

The bridge also seems to me quite high, as always it would be interesting to know these measures.

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