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Greg F.

Age and origin of old bow

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In conclusion, this bow was authenticated as a genuine Lamy pere bow.  The certificate did not note that any of the parts (adjuster, etc.) were replacements.  It has been sold and the proceeds went to a good cause (a handmade violin).

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That's great news, even if I have egg on my face.

I did find images of a Tourte copy with a rather large pearl eye, but yours has a regular Lamy head. I also never saw one before with an adjuster with a single collar.

You went east, so I suppose that means Isaac Salchow or Paul Childs ...

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59 minutes ago, martin swan said:

That's great news, even if I have egg on my face.

I did find images of a Tourte copy with a rather large pearl eye, but yours has a regular Lamy head. I also never saw one before with an adjuster with a single collar.

You went east, so I suppose that means Isaac Salchow or Paul Childs ...

I thought it looked right but didnt comment as" i didnt want egg on my face!":D

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ah well, nothing ventured nothing gained - I did think it was a good French bow and I didn't doubt the brand on the stick

but you have to concede that adjuster is far from typical!

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Found this photo of a lamy pere cello frog /button. It appears to have a single collar but cant be certain. I think its probably just a matter of the maker messing up the second collar and deciding to  remove it all together. Or it may be intentional. I notice on the one you have for sale it has the second collar almost filed off, giving an effect like Peccatte (and one or two others)collars.

lamypere.jpg

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Makes sense ... I agree the 2nd cut is sometimes very fine, so I suppose if it mashes you would just remove it.

In fact I have two Lamy cello bows, and I see one has no second cut to speak of ... perhaps I should spend more time looking and less time reading!!

lamy-frogs.thumb.jpg.4a0f19f0748d2241ef217cbd44500ed7.jpg

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2 hours ago, martin swan said:

Makes sense ... I agree the 2nd cut is sometimes very fine, so I suppose if it mashes you would just remove it.

In fact I have two Lamy cello bows, and I see one has no second cut to speak of ... perhaps I should spend more time looking and less time reading!!

lamy-frogs.thumb.jpg.4a0f19f0748d2241ef217cbd44500ed7.jpg

What does second cut mean?

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We`re refering to the collar rings  on the button. The second cut  (smaller collar ring )is rather misleading as its usually cut first . When the octagonal facets are filed on the button the inner collar is often messed up ,although Peccatte nearly always did it. When the button is filed to a slight taper the inner ring is removed where the flats are leaving just the remains of the ring on the corners of the facets. Hope this explains ! Many early French makers only made one collar ring.

button.jpg

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17 minutes ago, fiddlecollector said:

We`re refering to the collar rings  on the button. The second cut  (smaller collar ring )is rather misleading as its usually cut first . When the octagonal facets are filed on the button the inner collar is often messed up ,although Peccatte nearly always did it. When the button is filed to a slight taper the inner ring is removed where the flats are leaving just the remains of the ring on the corners of the facets. Hope this explains ! Many early French makers only made one collar ring.

button.jpg

That's amazing, I know you guys are looking at something,,, but I have not a clue what.     I get it after reading it a dozen times, it's not you, it's me,,I can be a bit thick.

Now it makes perfect sense,,,,kind of like a fingerprint and it's only one detail!  I don't do bows, I see it could be highly engaging,,,maybe in another life time! The cart is full!

Thanks!

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I should also mention  that if the second collar ring is cut too shallow ,it can disappear completely when the octagonal facets are formed. Some well known makers actually soldered a seperate piece on to form the collars from .

Also if the collars are cut too deep they can cut right through the silver depending on how thick the silver plate was they used.

Some makers used very thin silver bend around to form the octagonal facets instead of making two round rings and filing them from round.

There are many different ways of doing it.

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15 hours ago, GeorgeH said:

Who was the maker?

Don Noon.  I'm very pleased with it, although I cut the end of a finger the other day chopping vegetables so I haven't played it as much as I'd like.

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28 minutes ago, Greg F. said:

Don Noon.  I'm very pleased with it, although I cut the end of a finger the other day chopping vegetables so I haven't played it as much as I'd like.

Great! Thanks for letting us know. I always like to hear about folks buying great American violins. I hope you heal quickly.

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48 minutes ago, Greg F. said:

Don Noon.  I'm very pleased with it, although I cut the end of a finger the other day chopping vegetables so I haven't played it as much as I'd like.

Photos?

.....................of the fiddle not the finger!

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