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Nice! :)

Your cradle always makes me smile...^_^

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33 minutes ago, Rue said:

Nice! :)

Your cradle always makes me smile...^_^

Because its goofy looking?  Overkill like most things I make (anything worth doing is worth over doing)? Recycled flooring? Or you actually like it (weirdo)? :P  Most people laugh when they see it and say what the hell is that?

-Jim

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Well, looks like it's time to learn to make varnish.  Second coat is drying in the UV box and my varnish bottle is empty.  Color is coming along as planned, but 2 coats is still too pale for my target color.  I think I'll be happy with 3 maybe 4 coats total.  here's a pic with the first coat.

-Jim

5975dfd0aa304_back1coat.thumb.JPG.608148f107a639b76809b78a709b4008.JPG

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On 7/24/2017 at 8:23 AM, christian bayon said:

Nice, warm color!

Thanks!  I keep looking at your "red period" back photo and wondering if I should just call it done.  It's dark enough, just hasn't arrived at my mental target color.  The time delay has me gnashing my teeth.  I will do some touch up tonight with my left over drops of varnish.  Then start on setup this weekend as I wait for varnish materials and start washing oil.

Cheers,

Jim

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One of the benefits of building up a varnish layer is that it allows the perceived coloration to vary with the angle of observation relative to the light source.  This enhances the beauty of flamed maple and bearclaw spruce.

A very thin varnish film does not allow this.

 

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23 minutes ago, Janito said:

One of the benefits of building up a varnish layer is that it allows the perceived coloration to vary with the angle of observation relative to the light source.  This enhances the beauty of flamed maple and bearclaw spruce.

A very thin varnish film does not allow this.

 

A good push to stay the course.  That said this varnish already has a very high degree of dichroism (right word?).  It can look very blond or dark depending on light source and angle of incidence.  So I judge it on it's middle color which I think would be improved with a bit more varnish.  Thanks for not letting me be a slacker. :)

-Jim

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On 7/19/2017 at 7:14 PM, Rue said:

Nice! :)

Your cradle always makes me smile...^_^

It makes me sweat,,,it's just not how we do it here,,, and ,,, and well,,,,I've never tried it,,, and I'm just afraid. It looks wiggly and squiggly and all I can wonder is how fast could I spin that fiddle before it flew the coop. Maybe I could wrap copper wire around the fiddle for the armature,, and make the field coils like in boy scouts,,,,I know I lost you Rue,,sorry,,,

( They are kids with shovels that clean Dead vermin from outhouses) Then put the power to it and watch it spin,,,that's what the kid in me sees when I look at it..

It"s probably a real good way to do it, I can certainly see some benefits,,,, I will try it when I varnish next time,, I promise,, and I will report back how many volts it took to get it dry.

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30 minutes ago, Evan Smith said:

It makes me sweat,,,it's just not how we do it here,,, and ,,, and well,,,,I've never tried it,,, and I'm just afraid. It looks wiggly and squiggly and all I can wonder is how fast could I spin that fiddle before it flew the coop. Maybe I could wrap copper wire around the fiddle for the armature,, and make the field coils like in boy scouts,,,,I know I lost you Rue,,sorry,,,

( They are kids with shovels that clean Dead vermin from outhouses) Then put the power to it and watch it spin,,,that's what the kid in me sees when I look at it..

It"s probably a real good way to do it, I can certainly see some benefits,,,, I will try it when I varnish next time,, I promise,, and I will report back how many volts it took to get it dry.

At the workshop everyone referred to it as my rotisserie. :lol:  It's mostly a place to set the fiddle down.  I also have a hole in the middle bottom to stand it up right if the neck is wet with something.  If I'm varnishing in the cradle it's usually just for the front or back.  Most of the time I don't use the cradle for the actual varnish application.

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On 7/19/2017 at 7:57 PM, Jim Bress said:

Because its goofy looking?  Overkill like most things I make (anything worth doing is worth over doing)? Recycled flooring? Or you actually like it (weirdo)? :P  Most people laugh when they see it and say what the hell is that?

-Jim

 

4 hours ago, Evan Smith said:

It makes me sweat,,,it's just not how we do it here,,, and ,,, and well,,,,I've never tried it,,, and I'm just afraid. It looks wiggly and squiggly and all I can wonder is how fast could I spin that fiddle before it flew the coop. Maybe I could wrap copper wire around the fiddle for the armature,, and make the field coils like in boy scouts,,,,I know I lost you Rue,,sorry,,,

( They are kids with shovels that clean Dead vermin from outhouses) Then put the power to it and watch it spin,,,that's what the kid in me sees when I look at it..

It"s probably a real good way to do it, I can certainly see some benefits,,,, I will try it when I varnish next time,, I promise,, and I will report back how many volts it took to get it dry.

It's goofy looking!  ^_^  But I understand the rationale behind it! 

Evan:  I have a hubby with a shovel...I think he's out there now.  I also armed him with garlic, silver bullets and salt...and the power washer....

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25 minutes ago, Rue said:

 

It's goofy looking!  ^_^  But I understand the rationale behind it! 

Evan:  I have a hubby with a shovel...I think he's out there now.  I also armed him with garlic, silver bullets and salt...and the power washer....

If it makes you smile then it's good for something.  :)

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49 minutes ago, Mike Spencer said:

Looking good Jim! what inspired you to try oil varnish?

Hi Mike,

I have a lot of solvent hypersensitivities.  Old topic.  Basically I thought spirit varnish was my only option.  I have a spirit varnish That I really like, can apply well, and I know how to manipulate the color to what I want.  Last years workshop with Joe Thrift I did not participate in the second week because I didn't want to risk exposure to oil varnish and the associated solvents.  Joe later assured me that he has zero solvents in his varnish and only uses turps to clean his brushes which he can do outside if I'm a participant.  This year I signed up for two weeks that included the varnish/set-up week.  I bought a $50 Chinese white to take as a varnish experiment trying out different applications from my own spirit varnish protocol, to Joe's method, to the ba$tard step children that took different combinations from each.  I did this mostly for fun and publicly called Joe out for a varnish throw down. :D  Joe kicked my butt.  Here's what I learned.

1. I'm not sensitive to Joe's (Roger Hargrave's) varnish. +

2.  Should things go wrong, Joe's varnish can be stripped with alcohol. +

3.  I can perfectly clean the brushes with soap and water. +

4. Side by side on the same piece of wood regardless of ground, Joe's varnish has much, much better optical properties than my spirit varnish. +

5.  I find spirit varnishing easier. -

6.  I have a lot to learn about coloring oil varnishes. -

7.  Spirit varnish is way easier to make than oil varnish. -

Basically, I find oil varnish more time and effort, but worth the results for me.  I've been using my meager remains of varnish touching up minor imperfections on the ribs and belly.  Removing blotches by applying varnish to the light spots.  I think I am going to have everything except the back how I want it by the time I use up my last drop.  That will just leave me an unobstructed back to finish when I finally get a workable varnish made.  The varnish is incredible light sensitive, showing a different look under different light sources and angle of incidence.  I did some very minor touch-ups (chasing down the few remaining light spots on the belly) outside this morning under a cloudy sky.  Loved the look of everything except the back.  I'll post a natural light picture out of direct sunlight as soon as I get a chance.  In direct sunlight it's a blaze of yellow fire.  Hopefully this isn't a one off where things magically combined to make something special.  That would suck. :)  Sorry for the overly long response.  Just excited.

Cheers,

Jim

 

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Short diversion from violin making.  I saw this beautiful lady taking her children out for an afternoon stroll while on my lunch break walk.

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I am taking it a step further I decided. I am going to grow my own violin! :P

Spruce and maple. Hope they are right varieties...

20170826_151301.jpg

20170826_151432.jpg

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13 minutes ago, Rue said:

I am taking it a step further I decided. I am going to grow my own violin! :P

Spruce and maple. Hope they are right varieties...

So cool!  I love planting trees.  If I could live long enough I would definitely build instruments from the trees I plant.  What species did you buy?  I can't see any maple leaves in the picture.  I'm sure they're there, just can't see them in the pictures.   BTW, I love your new lab space.

-Jim

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There's blue and white spruce...and that first deciduous tree (of the 3) is an Amur Maple  (the other two are Mountain Ash and Linden)...

The lab space is quite nice. Good light. Handy exit door...

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34 minutes ago, Rue said:

There's blue and white spruce...and that first deciduous tree (of the 3) is an Amur Maple  (the other two are Mountain Ash and Linden)...

The lab space is quite nice. Good light. Handy exit door...

Acer ginnala is a new maple for me.  Linden spp.  are also used for purfling, so you can grow your purfling as well. :D  Here's my chunk of Linden.

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3 hours ago, Jim Bress said:

Acer ginnala is a new maple for me.  Linden spp.  are also used for purfling, so you can grow your purfling as well. :D  Here's my chunk of Linden.

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Wow, and I thought the one I was making was overkill on the thickness! That's awesome! :)

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20 minutes ago, FoxMitchell said:

Wow, and I thought the one I was making was overkill on the thickness! That's awesome! :)

I would have made a thinner cradle if I had a taller bench. ;)

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