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Jack Devereux

Del Gesu Edgework

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I've never really thought of GDG as having "long" corners. Small and delicate, yes. Extending out from the rib structure, yes. But even the late ones like the Kochanski the impression of length is primarily due to the purfling miter being set farther back from the end of the plate corner and certainly don't have the sweep of some Amati's or of his own grandfather Andrea.

By the way Martin, aside from the amusement factor, I think your analogy to what was happening in contemporary painting is pretty astute. I guess that is the kind of thing you notice if you don't spend all your time making wood chips.

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Just re-reading this thread (got fun towards the end!) as I'm back in the same spot with a new fiddle as I was when I first posted. Spent some time with the information here, Mr Hargraves writings on the subject and pictures of the Chardon and the Joachim (which is the one I'm freaking out about the most right now), came up with something like this. Any thoughts? Am I in the ballpark? Thanks!

 

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I also think that Jack's corner looks good but think extending the end would be a mistake  as regards both it's look and resemblance to original DG corners.  Not to mention that a corner that long really would be more likely to get broken off.

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Cool, thanks for the information! What do you think of the edgework beyond the corner? Does the ridge between the edge and purfling look right? Just looking at the picture I'm seeing some lumps that bug me, but maybe a little bit of that is right for the model? Again, what I'm going for is new, untiqued del Gesu (with the caveat of not being too funky to sell...).

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A picture is worth a thousand words. Del Gesu Chardon. Similar to Jack's work above in some respects.

 

For the life of me i can't understand why the Chardon isn't talked about more often. In terms of edge work and varnish it has more to say than the Messiah. Look at the colour, the texture and the the imperfections in the varnish where dust has settled before the varnish tacked up.

 

See also the Lord Wilton -- the corers clearly have something in common with the Chardon. 

post-45462-0-58501300-1480450191_thumb.jpg

post-45462-0-29692100-1480450684_thumb.jpg

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For the life of me i can't understand why the Chardon isn't talked about more often. In terms of edge work and varnish it has more to say than the Messiah.

 

Is that a lightening of the varnish along the rib-plate seam?

 

This has been called 'glue ghosting', but I have seen similar pulling away of the varnish around the turns of a scroll (no glue in sight).

 

A topic for a separate thread.

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Where is the Chardon located? Is it somewhere it could be seen?

It belongs to the Nippon Foundation of Japan. I posted the photograph of the Chardon, illustrated in Urban luthiers post, a few years ago.

 

Bruce

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Is the violin in post 20 the "Wilton?"

 

Note how long that back corner is from the rib miter.  One maker who has been around the original said that as long as his copy's corners are, he doesn't have the nerve to make them as long as they should be because his customers would not believe it possible.  So he compromises by about 2mm.

 

This thread and my post seem so long ago for some reason.  

 

I'm quoting myself and adding to it because the maker I mentioned was Neil Ertz.  As I recall, I think he said he had been with Roger Hargrave at Machold's when he saw the "Wilton." ( I need to figure out how to post pictures because I know everyone would love to see Neil's copy.)  On his copy he has left the back corners intact but shortened the top's corners as if they had been knocked off, and worn with time, and not restored.  I assume he must have made more copies of it over the years; if anyone knows I would appreciate hearing about it.    

 

I always meant to ask him why he took that route, but never got around to it.  I can think of one reason:  perhaps the top corners on the original have new wood and his copy, then, might represent the Wilton before some early restoration of the corners.

 

I just found this link, which shows the overhang better than most pictures:

 

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