Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Violin/bow makers, and eyesight.


Craig Tucker
 Share

Recommended Posts

Now that I'e turned 60, I have developed somewhat poor eyesight (a heavy cataract (clouding over) in my left eye). Since I have always (almost always, that is) worn glasses, I have been fairly well used to dealing with some issues having to do with my eyes - but luckily for me, without my "long distance glasses" I have been able to focus up close with almost microscopic clarity.

 

Very good for my chosen profession both as a graphic artist and violin making, repairing, re-hairing - etc.

 

I'm curious how many makers have had to deal with this problem in the past (or present) and, how did it go with the supposedly quick and effective (eye surgery) remedy that is available today?

 

I have been told that a fifteen minute procedure, will take care of this problem, with a completely swift recovery also?

 

With in the last year this started - and fairly suddenly I have found that I have lost all practical vision in my left eye...

 

Hey, I'm just curious - I have found (by asking around) that this happens very commonly and everyone I talk to, that has had it done says -  "Just go do it, and continue on with your life".

 

Anyone??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 92
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

At a certain point you have to get it seen to.  But, a friend of mine came out and, although he could see fine, his eyes were completely red....like he was an alien.  It looked so scary he had to cancel all his teaching for a few weeks. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have tri-focals now, hate them.  I have to take a step back or forward to keep the music in focus when playing.  My built in microscope only seems to work in one eye now.  Cataracts in both eyes, but not enough for insurance to pay for a fix.   For making, I'm constantly taking my glasses off for close work, then putting them back on if I'm working from a bit farther away.  I've always said I wouldn't risk my eyes to surgery if I can get the job done with glasses that I've been wearing since I was 8 years old.  I'll be talking to my eye doc on my next appointment about surgery options.  Sorry this post makes me sound like a whiner.  It's just A-G-E disease.  We all have it and it's progressive and ultimately terminal.  I think it's a requirement for being alive, so if you got it, that's good. :)

 

-Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  Sorry this post makes me sound like a whiner.  It's just A-G-E disease.  We all have it and it's progressive and ultimately terminal.  I think it's a requirement for being alive, so if you got it, that's good. :)

 

-Jim

 

A requirement for being alive...

Ha!

Me-likes that!

 

If you're a whiner, then so am I, and I don't think I've ever really been a whiner.  (nor do you sound like one)

But I still want to know about all of the possible options (if there are any) as, even though I'm a medical patient that has been through much (30 years dialysis & etc., etc., etc.) - my eyes and my sight and vision - have always been a GREAT CONCERN of mine.

 

Thanks all, for the answers thus far - I'm seeing an optometrist about his opinion of a possible surgery, next week.

 

GAK!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Aging eyes suck. I am trying to find a workable solution with my glasses. I currently have 4 pair, trying to find something that works most of the time. I have:

1. Progressives: My 'normal' go-to glasses. Fine for daily activities, but annoying if I need to focus on anything closer, like my computer, or read a book, etc.

2. Office glasses. These are essentially short range progressive meant for reading and doing desk work. They are fine for seeing anything with a 4 foot range.

3. Bifocals. I tried these to see if they would work for close and far vision - I gave up the middle range. Now I can read a book and watch TV at the same time. Something I can't do with the progressives or the office glasses. But the line drives me batty - for some reason my glasses always slip down my nose and I'm constantly looking at the line.

4. Reading glasses. These are by far the best for reading. Much better than the office glasses. But I can only see within about 2.5 feet.

So...next go around...I will give up the office glasses. I will rethink the bifocals.

I will have to have the progressives and I am keeping reading glasses.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since your sudden clouding of the left eye have you seen the doc? I had a vitreous separation in my right eye which also clouds the eye. It's very common with nearsighted people in their 60s. I'm getting cataracts too. The lenses will correct for near or far but not both I think, like contacts. Most if not all people are very pleased with the outcome. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Craig,

 

No idea if this is relevant to your situation but my mom was scheduled to have her cataracts removed two years after she had, and mostly recovered from, her first stroke.

 

One of the requirements of the procedure was that she discontinue her blood thinning meds temporarily prior to the surgery. She did so and that brought on her second and fatal stroke.

 

There's always the "big picture" to look at and a balancing of risks vs. benefits which you're probably not going to solve here.

 

But emotional support is good too.

 

Good luck,

 

Ben

 

PS I shamelessly copied your (also shamelessly copied) bow sanding sled. Love it! Thanks for the pics.

 

I have a low tech octagon sander you'll probably like too. I'll put it on your bow thread when I get back home next week.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Rue,

 

it sounds to me like you're still dealing with prescription issues (of which I am very familiar...) 

 

Have you not encountered any "clouding" issues yet?

I hope not.

Though, the various strength glasses for various tasks, are a great  pita, I could live with that.

 

As it stands, until I get this correction done - I will not even drive any-more unless I absolutely must. And then, I only use my "good" eye.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Craig, I talk weekly  with patients who  have had cataract surgery.  They  are overwhelmingly positive about it.  The trouble for  most is that "in between" when you notice it, but it's  not bad enough for insurance to cover it.  They can do things like lens replacements that will have a prescription in it, that will help you near, or far.  Talk to your Opthomologist about your options, including "zapping" the cataracts with lasers, lense replacement etc.  Do it all sooner than later as it is pretty inevitable and you will have better eyesight sooner.  

Rue: You should be able to read with your progressives (especially your desktop (intermediate) progressives.  By swithing glasses all the time, you are decreasing you brain's ability to get used to the smaller corridor in the progressive for reading, further annoying you-most likely.  It's  really a brain thing. I'm assuming that your progressives are right though.  Bi focals really screw with your ability to adapt with progressives.  I would recommend you stay with both  styles of  your progressives.  You can  get your desktop  progressives to push further out  than 4 ft, it's a different design, but works  the same.  Most labs  call it a "room progressive".  I use this in  my  shop as I don't need to see more than 15' and by asking the lens  design to "progress less", I still have a larger reading area than my regular progressives.  The trick is to figure out what your working distances are for the top portion.  Minimum and  maximum and have  your optician and/or your optometrist figure  it out.  jeff

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With my latest glasses, compared to no glasses, sometimes straight lines appear curved and curves appear straight or like an opposite curve.  I would need to seriously address that if I was a bow maker!

 

Regarding that cataract surgery if you have no practical vision in that eye, what have you got to lose. 

 

Something that would give me pause is a lot of people get both eyes done at the same time.  I'd be worried I'd get a hack doctor who'd make me totally blind.  If he did ok with one, then I'd let him do the other.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm 65 and have worn glasses for 55 years, very near sighted. I have had the laser surgery, it was a disaster, not recommended. 2 years ago I had cataract surgery. There was no recovery problems at all, just walked out after surgery and could see. I do not recommend the replacement lens that correct for closeup and distance. I wanted them but my doctor refused. I got distance correction only and  still have to use reading glasses for close up. Not perfect but the best option. I wish I had done it 10 yrs. earlier.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am an ophthalmologist.  The best time to do cataract surgery is when there is functional impairment.  The risks are very small in most hands, and extremely small in very skilled hands.  Since you have significant functional impairment, the potential benefit in your case would greatly outweigh that small risk.  All good advise from your colleagues.  Best wishes!  Feel free to PM me for a second opinion if you would like.

 

Johann

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Credit to CT.....I think that this is one of the most important questions out there with significant forensic implications......It would be incredible to get to the age of 50 and be able to do close detail work...let alone 70 or 90! ...... Either Strad had usable glasses or he was a good instructor to young workers with 20/20 vision?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bill Merkel: your curved lines can be for various reasons.  Just had a patient 2 weeks  ago that had  the same  deal once we increased his reading add power on his progressive lenses.  Worked with him  extensively to find that for some reason his brain didn't deal well with the same add power for both eyes.  Sometimes it's adaptation, sometimes (most often) I have found  it to be the base curve  of the  lens.   Anyway, you should take advantage of celloKc's offer of advise as I'm thinking you should get to the bottom  of this.  Some Optometrist's (more  experienced) might be able to deal with this, but I would probably see an opthomologist (MD).  The seem to nail stuff like  this better and faster.  But do  something about it, don't bull through it, no need to.  jeff

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Rue: You should be able to read with your progressives (especially your desktop (intermediate) progressives.  By swithing glasses all the time, you are decreasing you brain's ability to get used to the smaller corridor in the progressive for reading, further annoying you-most likely.  It's  really a brain thing. I'm assuming that your progressives are right though.  Bi focals really screw with your ability to adapt with progressives.  I would recommend you stay with both  styles of  your progressives.  You can  get your desktop  progressives to push further out  than 4 ft, it's a different design, but works  the same.  Most labs  call it a "room progressive".  I use this in  my  shop as I don't need to see more than 15' and by asking the lens  design to "progress less", I still have a larger reading area than my regular progressives.  The trick is to figure out what your working distances are for the top portion.  Minimum and  maximum and have  your optician and/or your optometrist figure  it out.  jeff

Yes...the switching is an issue. But without trying options I didn't know what would work best for me. I wish I could still wear contacts, and then just have reading glasses on top of those, but I can't tolerate the contacts anymore.

I get the most eye relief when wearing the single-vision reading glasses. And I can read again! : ) I had almost given up reading for pleasure because I couldn't find a comfortable reading position (ie., head angle/tilt together with a lens type).

Next go around (in a year or so) I'll have a better idea of what works for me. Problem is each of my different hobbies has totally different vision requirements...and the progressives aren't addressing those, instead they are causing eyestrain and general stress.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Credit to CT.....I think that this is one of the most important questions out there with significant forensic implications......It would be incredible to get to the age of 50 and be able to do close detail work...let alone 70 or 90! ...... Either Strad had usable glasses or he was a good instructor to young workers with 20/20 vision?

 

I don't know whether Stradivari used eyeglasses but they were used to correct close or distance vision and also presbyopia (age-related decline of close vision) in the early 1600's so it would not have been impossible for Strad to have glasses.  Here's a link to a Wikipedia article on the use and history of eyeglasses: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glasses

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Credit to CT.....I think that this is one of the most important questions out there with significant forensic implications......It would be incredible to get to the age of 50 and be able to do close detail work...let alone 70 or 90! ...... Either Strad had usable glasses or he was a good instructor to young workers with 20/20 vision?

 

 

I don't know whether Stradivari used eyeglasses but they were used to correct close or distance vision and also presbyopia (age-related decline of close vision) in the early 1600's so it would not have been impossible for Strad to have glasses.  Here's a link to a Wikipedia article on the use and history of eyeglasses: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glasses

 

Yes, up to a point.

 

Having struggled with the annoyances of off-the-shelf glasses, I would suppose that the technologies available at that time would not have produced results much better than that type of perpetual 'slightly off' situation.

 

There is also distortion/deterioration of colour perception.  A colleague of mine remarked one day "As I get older, the clothes I wear get redder and brighter".

 

---------------

Just to the right of my desk...

post-24474-0-87799900-1463847754_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, I've got a name and some very satisfied clients, of an eye specialist that has his office here in Roswell.

 

I am going to go talk with him, Monday morning, and see (er... I mean listen to) what he has to say.

 

Thanks for all the responces, and great ideas. I'll be back either Mon or Tues> and clue youse guys in to exactly what they tell me.

You've all given me much to think about and discuss with both the optometrist and my kndney doctors as I am on blood thinners also every other day and many other ect.'s..

 

My thanks all

 

ct.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, up to a point.

 

 

There is also distortion/deterioration of colour perception.  A colleague of mine remarked one day "As I get older, the clothes I wear get redder and brighter".

 

---------------

Just to the right of my desk...

 

Speaking from personal experience; the colours get dimmer and and more drab. When I had my cataract done on the left eye, looking through the right eye only, everything seemed faded and dingy. After that I had the right one done as well. Two different surgeons; they both did a brilliant job!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...