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~ Ben Conover
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Dang ...had one but lost it...ouch! Not sure how they could improve it ....more expensive than I can afford , larger disk , magnetic quick change disks for different grits ,

 

Mine I have to disassemble to change paper..... all in all though it's very nice tool , I  clamp simple guide blocks to the retrofit plywood platen for neck heal angles , squaring ribs , making nuts, saddles,   "squaring" fingerboard ends, all kinds of jobs , one distinct advantage is the low speed doesn't throw dust everywhere, and if the power grid goes out ...I'm still in "business" LOL ,  

Yeah. :unsure:

Part of the pleasure of the Alberti tool was the design and how much fun it was to use it. Effortless. I would walk by it and spin it just for kicks. The satisfaction of the magnets clicking the discs into place...

Good times...

However, shame on me, in retrospect I really only did use it for 90 degree grinding mostly with 150 grit paper. I think the original design was more for bow makers. (?)

 

My fantasy of NEEDING an Alberti sander will have to match up with my working reality, otherwise I'll be getting the next best.

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What Ben shows what he wants to get would be worthless to me presently.  I don't see any use for one with violins excepting if the table tilts for sanding an exacting heel angle.

 

I have to admit that I wish I had a hand crank sander this morning.  I have a neck heel, the glue surface against the neck block, where I need to lose 1mm of length throughout the entire face.   If I don't remove wood it will be a 8mm neck set instead of 6 or 7mm. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 year later...
On 6/7/2016 at 3:11 PM, ~ Ben Conover said:

Another new Jet !
Yes.....it's lovely isn't it.
 

Think I'll stop with Sanders now, although a small Proxxon may be good for finishing f/b ends....hm. 
Go Bernie !!

post-24957-0-35261100-1465326668_thumb.jpg

Ben, I recently picked up a old floor model 12" Wilton disc sander from Craigslist.  To good a deal to walk away from.  Currently has a coarse grit paper used for grinding metal that I need to replace.  What grit paper do you like to use? 

Thanks,

Jim

Edit: My Google-Fu indicates that too coarse a grit can cause tearing and too fine a grit will quickly build heat and cause burning.  I guess I'm looking for the Goldilocks grit. 

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Hi All - On using drill press mounted sanding bobbins...

i) Christopher Jacoby wrote " Pro tip-- throw the spindles in the freezer when it's time to swap the sleeves out." It's quicker to slacken off the expanding nut, drop the bobbin on the floor and roll it backwards and forwards with your foot.

ii) it pays to adjust the sander in the drill press for minimum run-out. Maybe it's from setting up work in a lathe - I have found it no trouble to get these things to run quite true.

iii) I did turn up an aluminium holder that used two o-rings to supply the clamping force. Decided that it was a wasted effort as the drill chuck didn't run true and you still had to fiddle with it.

iv) still toying with fitting a sewing machine motor and crank to a spare drill press and make it into an oscillating sander. However wiping the sander clean with one of those plastic "rubbers" before things clog up, works just fine.

cheers edi

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1 hour ago, edi malinaric said:

Hi All - On using drill press mounted sanding bobbins...

i) Christopher Jacoby wrote " Pro tip-- throw the spindles in the freezer when it's time to swap the sleeves out." It's quicker to slacken off the expanding nut, drop the bobbin on the floor and roll it backwards and forwards with your foot.

I've never had trouble slipping the sleeves off of the rubber bobbins. If I have a stubborn sleeve I usually loosen the nut at the top, then pull it up off of the bobbin while it's still on the machine. 

BUT OH NO YOU'LL THROW THE MANDREL OUT OF ALIGNMENT!!! they said.

Maybe for some, but not for this guy! *points to his own smug face*

I've even used compressed air and administered it in between the sleeve and bobbin with the inflation needle to loosen the buggers. 

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I alway loosen the tension on sanding drums, and more often than not I remove the sanding sleeves whenever I'm not using them. The reason for that is that leaving the rubber drums under that compression causes them to distort and greatly shortens their lifespan. Kind of OCD, but it works for me.

And Edi, there was a commercial product some years ago that ran off the drill press spindle rotation, engaged the drill press's own advance mechanism, and supposedly adapted any drill press to be an oscillating spindle sander. It didn't last very long on the market. I can kind of guess why. Such a device could put 100 years of wear on your drill press quill-to-head fit, not to mention wear to the quill advance rack and pinion, in about a week.

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Hi Nick and Mark,

I've used compressed air to pop off fibreglas from moulds, the rolling foot technique work beautifully - softens the rubber and re-centres everything - quick too.

Good call on spoiling the drill press quill -  maybe I should and take an oscillating sander to pieces first and see how it's put together.

cheers edi

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You guys are thinking too small. I recently picked up this Max Spindle Sander. It was love at first sight. Speaking of disc sanders, we recently upgraded from a 9" to a 12" machine at our shop. it's opened up new possibilities to me and has me lusting after a larger disc. Like 20"-24", but I'm leaning towards 24". Anyone have a disc of that size? One of the big benefits I see in those machines is they typically have a screw adjustment mechanism for the table tilt. That would make dialing in precise angles much easier.

 

IMG_20171102_141845.jpg

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We had a Max spindle sander in the cabinet shop I worked in, a great machine, precise, vibrationless, silent. And the pattern maker's shop two doors away from us had a shop full of Max machines, among them was a 24" reversible disc sander and a 36" double disc sander with a 10 horsepower 3-phase direct drive motor. That machine used to coast for five minutes after you turned it off. In fact, pretty much all of the pattern maker's machines came from Max's own pattern shop in San Jose, CA, acquired at auction when Max shut down about 30 years ago now. My understanding is that someone continued to make that spindle sander in Asia, but I heard from a person who had owned both an original and an Asian copy that the remake didn't compare in quality. Those Max machines were a whole different class of tool, made to meet the precision demands of pattern makers specifically.

Joey, your spindle sander looks like it had been left outside for a few years. I hope you can bring it back to life.

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29 minutes ago, MarkBouquet clearsky said:

We had a Max spindle sander in the cabinet shop I worked in, a great machine, precise, vibrationless, silent. And the pattern maker's shop two doors away from us had a shop full of Max machines, among them was a 24" reversible disc sander and a 36" double disc sander with a 10 horsepower 3-phase direct drive motor. That machine used to coast for five minutes after you turned it off. In fact, pretty much all of the pattern maker's machines came from Max's own pattern shop in San Jose, CA, acquired at auction when Max shut down about 30 years ago now. My understanding is that someone continued to make that spindle sander in Asia, but I heard from a person who had owned both an original and an Asian copy that the remake didn't compare in quality. Those Max machines were a whole different class of tool, made to meet the precision demands of pattern makers specifically

Joey, your spindle sander looks like it had been left outside for a few years. I hope you can bring it back to life.

That pattern makers shop must have been like a dream to visit. I'm keeping an eye out for older Max and State disc sanders. For what these machines are, the prices they go for are extremely reasonable.

 The rust on my machine was very shallow and only took about an hour to clean. I'm powering it with a VFD which gives me speed control, making for nice precision on delicate work. I've been wary of 3 phase machines in the past, but I'm a total convert now. My belt/disc combo is 3 phase as well and having the speed control and ability to reverse is wonderful.

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I have a Ridgid oscillating belt/spindle sander. Am very pleased with its' price and performance(it's very quiet).

I too have a 12" disc sander that is part of the Shopsmith combo tool(lathe,horizontal drill press,disc sander and table saw). They are pricey new, but used ones can be had for a great deal less.

 

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  • 2 months later...
On 11/7/2017 at 5:39 PM, Jim Bress said:

Ben, I recently picked up a old floor model 12" Wilton disc sander from Craigslist.  To good a deal to walk away from.  Currently has a coarse grit paper used for grinding metal that I need to replace.  What grit paper do you like to use? 

Thanks,

Jim

Edit: My Google-Fu indicates that too coarse a grit can cause tearing and too fine a grit will quickly build heat and cause burning.  I guess I'm looking for the Goldilocks grit. 

Hi Jim, 
Been using the sander for lots of things including silver. 
I use 150 grit mostly, change discs quite often, there's a good trick in putting the disc on where you use a half moon of paper....
Good luck. 

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3 hours ago, ~ Ben Conover said:

Hi Jim, 
Been using the sander for lots of things including silver. 
I use 150 grit mostly, change discs quite often, there's a good trick in putting the disc on where you use a half moon of paper....
Good luck. 

Thanks Ben.  Ended up buying 120 grit.  It's working fine for me.

-Jim

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