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Feel the Bern...
Maybe good for shaping corner blocks scrolls edges etc, 

anyone using one and are finer grit loadings available ?

 http://www.axminster.co.uk/jet-jbos-5-oscillating-spindle-sander-510316

I know most people will prefer their own drill press bobbin sander jigs, 
(yes I have one) but I'd have thought a proper machine for the job would do the job 'better'.
A few hand tools will do the job as well, but we live in 2016 not 1666. 

 

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I use one of these: http://www.sears.com/powertec-os1000-oscillating-spindle-sander/p-00935826000P?prdNo=1&blockNo=1&blockType=G1

It's cheaper and has 2 more sizes of drums than the equivalent Delta machine.

 

I use it for tons of things, including those already mentioned.  I also thickness ribs and trim bridge feet, both with specially made fixtures.

 

Even with the finer grits and the oscillating spindle, there are still scratches and grooves that can't be ignored for a finished surface.  It's OK for the cornerblocks or other internal things, but scraping is necessary for others.

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Thanks Mike,
The Grizzly looks a great price and larger table than some of the other bench standing ones. 
Is it sturdy ?

There's a Delta with longer spindles (good for Cello blocks) but it's pricey. 
http://www.deltamachinery.com/products/sanders/item/31-483?category_id=7
Can you use longer spindles on the Grizzly ? 

Cheers. 


 

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Jason, I used a simple drill press sander too for 20 years it works ok but not as square to the bed as a spindle sander would be. 

I think a few well chosen machines are a great idea. :-)

 

I don't know about the higher-priced, more industrial machines, but I wouldn't expect the spindle of a cheaper machine to be perfectly square.  Mine isn't.  I found the orientation on the table where it is most square, and make sure to use that area if squareness is critical.  And the spindle doesn't necessarily move up and down precisely along the spindle axis, and those rubber mandrels add some more variation.  I machined up some more precise wooden mandrels for certain sizes that I use most often for more precise work, like thicknessing ribs.

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In a shop where I used to work I used the spindle sander quite a bit. Don pointed out the limits to accuracy pretty well. Compared with a drill press sanding drum, though, the osillation prevents the tracks that form as the paper gets loaded unevenly. I've also read that drum sanders can contribute to unusual wear on your drill press especially if you use a lot of pressure against the sanding drum, for example with a rib thicknessing jig.

The setup shop where I started out as a luthier had spindle sanders mounted in every bench so only the spindle protruded on the benchtop. There was a cyclone dust collector in another room that would switch on and open the gate for the dust collector, so the dust was minimal. We used it primarily for rough fitting the bridges before finishing with a chisel, and it's remarkable how quickly you can get a rough fit when you're used to it. Also helpful for making various jigs and forms.

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I use a JET bench milling machine. Clamp a 3/4" plywood base in the milling vise, that way I can get everything squared up. Since it is a milling machine there is no problem with side loads that you have with a drill press. Works great with drum sanders, end mills, and very accurate for drilling.

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I have the Delta benchtop version. I went with the Delta because it had the smallest amount of runout in a Fine Woodworking review. The spindle is not long enough for cello blocks. I've been very pleased with the performance.

I got it initially for corner blocks and jigs and other things, but I realized that I didn't want my corner blocks to be square. I intentionally try to make them off square now. I do use it for the backs of scroll blocks, and roughing out the neck shape. I've found it to be really helpful for making jigs and fixtures, and it's the logical counterpart to a disc sander.

M

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I have the Delta benchtop version. I went with the Delta because it had the smallest amount of runout in a Fine Woodworking review. The spindle is not long enough for cello blocks. I've been very pleased with the performance.

I got it initially for corner blocks and jigs and other things, but I realized that I didn't want my corner blocks to be square. I intentionally try to make them off square now. I do use it for the backs of scroll blocks, and roughing out the neck shape. I've found it to be really helpful for making jigs and fixtures, and it's the logical counterpart to a disc sander.

M

Michael, why do you not want your blocks square?  Do you want them at any particular angle, or are you just trying to stay away from the "cold" laser accuracy look? 

 

Thanks,

Jim

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Hey Jim,

Michael, why do you not want your blocks square?  Do you want them at any particular angle, or are you just trying to stay away from the "cold" laser accuracy look? 

 

Thanks,

Jim

Hey Jim,

I don't know if I've ever seen corner blocks on a classic instrument that were all perfectly square. You're quite right that sometimes perfection can feel a bit cold. I don't think it's an excuse to not hold yourself to a high standard, but it's not the look I'm going for.

M

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Hey Jim,

Hey Jim,

I don't know if I've ever seen corner blocks on a classic instrument that were all perfectly square. You're quite right that sometimes perfection can feel a bit cold. I don't think it's an excuse to not hold yourself to a high standard, but it's not the look I'm going for.

M

Me too. As long as the corners don't visually throw off the top and back plate corners to the point that they are super noticeable. I like a little bit of wonkiness in a violin. But that's just me.

 

I've been pining over a spindle sander for quite some time now, mostly for rib thicknessing, scroll outline shaping and mould forming.

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I use one of these, although this is one shown a slightly newer model, with the spindle storage brackets. I just keep all my spindles, wrenches and consumable sleeves in a handy cupboard above the spindle sander.

 

http://www.busybeetools.com/products/oscillating-spindle-sander-bench-top-csa-cx502.html

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