Sign in to follow this  
Will L

DESERT ISLAND PRACTICING

Recommended Posts

OK!  You are outward bound on a tramp steamer, leaving with the tide tomorrow morning. After seeing  that the rusty hulk they told you will get you safely to Bora Bora is nothing like the sleek ship in the glossy ads—the ones that conned you into this lark in the first place—you gulp and rush back to your apartment and replace your precious Seraphin with your Roth; call your insurance man to up your policy by a few zeros; and pick out a few scale books, methods, and etudes.  Because there is no use wasting away on an uncharted isle if one can use the time constructively.

 

Of course, since your packing skills were developed and honed from your 1970s back-packing experiences (where you even cut the handles off your toothbrushes to save weight), you don't want to bring your entire library.  So you wonder:  "What should I bring that will keep me fit as a fiddle and prepared for auditions if the worst should transpire?"  

 

And, since you are very wise, you realize that in ten or twenty years the standards may be much higher, so you are going to need to take materials which will not only keep up your current level but also improve your playing.

 

What would you bring and why?  (Canceling the whole thing and going to Disney World is not an acceptable answer.  We're looking for a learning experience here!)   :)

 

Depending on whether you are traveling 1st or 2cd class, or worse , what would you take if you had to limit yourself to only one thing; two things; three things; etc? Or, what works would give the most bang for the fewest pages?

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LOL.  Very wishful thinking that a piano should wash ashore.  But stranger things have happened...I suppose.  

 

Of course if the rusty old steamer had an orchestra or if a group of musicians were planning to "while away the hours" with joyous dolphin-attracting chamber music, then sure, you'd bring a lot of stuff.  But I see that when the chips are down you'll grab the Kreutzer, Flesch, and Bach as the old scow lists and finally sinks.  Seems like a good choice. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think I'm far enough along to answer this properly...

But I'd likely grab what I'm working now...so the Bach Partitas, the Paganini and any copy of some "World's Favourite Violin Solos"...

From that I'd concoct my own 'studies' and scale exercises...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bach, Bach, Bach,  all I hear is Bach.  What's so special about Bach, (as if I didn't know)?   :)  Imagine this being said by Bugs or Daffy and it will seem funnier.   :)

 

                                                                         Imag of Daffy Duck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Of course, since your packing skills were developed and honed from your 1970s back-packing experiences (where you even cut the handles off your toothbrushes to save weight), you don't want to bring your entire library.  So you wonder:  "What should I bring that will keep me fit as a fiddle and prepared for auditions if the worst should transpire?"

 

 

 

If the worst were to transpire you wouldn't need to worry about either wasting time or orchestra auditions.  Bora Bora doesn't have an orchestra, and transportation-wise, "if the worst should transpire", you're screwed (unless maybe you're a great swimmer...)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Same repertoire as Connie, but I'd add Schradiek and Uhl.  Maybe replace Keutzer with Mazas just because I like them better (assuming I am taking my viola and not my violin).  Of course, if I knew the ship was going to wreck, I wouldn't go - or would I?   I loved Johnny Castaway . . .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Same repertoire as Connie, but I'd add Schradiek and Uhl.  

Doc,

 

Your mention of Schradieck the other day is what inspired me to think about and ask the question.   :) 

 

I'm not familiar with Uhl.  What's the story with him? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm astonished someone knows about Alfred Uhl...  my quartet in Vienna played his "Jubiläumsquartett" in 1990 or 1991, working with him was interesting.  What did he write that you'd take with you?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 What did he write that you'd take with you?

 

 

Yes, please, Dr. S.

 

And why?

 

Thanks to Dr. S I have expanded my horizons a little,  and was impressed with Uhl.  But my topic is meant to find what materials provide the most beneficial practice materials in the least pages.  So if there are some specific Uhl works, I'd appreciate a listing.

 

The intent of my topic, though somewhat loose and open, is  to find a sort of "Swiss Army Knife" of maximum utility for a minimum of "educational material."

 

I'm enjoying all of the responses and picking up some ideas.  One interesting idea is Joe Positive's "...a few sheets each of..."  That's in the spirit of what I'm getting at.  After all, anyone can accumulate—and some of us HAVE :) —huge libraries of etudes, methods, and music, but what are the most worthwhile or useful or constructive works?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you actually objectively answer that?

LIke I said, once you know what you're doing (yes, I'm not there yet...)...you can make up your own exercises...

...and if not...

Why?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you actually objectively answer that?

LIke I said, once you know what you're doing (yes, I'm not there yet...)...you can make up your own exercises...

...and if not...

Why?

 

We can.  After all, all the exercise books we have were made up by someone.  I just wonder if we are as good at it as the Kreutzers and Sevciks of the world are.  But going to a desert island with nothing and coming home with a wonderful opus is a possibility.  

 

What I would be concerned with is that once I was on the island I might not be very aggressive and spend most of my time in the first position and in the middle of the bow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LIke I said, once you know what you're doing (yes, I'm not there yet...)...you can make up your own exercises...

 

 

Sure you can make up your own exercises, but it would be helpful to have at least a few things written down so you don't forget how to read (it is a desert island, after all).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Kat,

I make a lot of viola jokes, but really have a great deal of respect for violists. (Hey, Pebbles, you'll back me up, won't you, if you're reading this.)   :)

 

From the couple of pieces I listened to, I was very impressed with Uhl.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.