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Wallace Hartley Titanic Violin, is it being restored ?


Stadiravius
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  BUT I would love to hear it restored with Rachel Barton playing "Nearer my God to Thee" on it.  

Or "Row, Row, Row your Boat."  (Tasteless? I suppose so.   :) )  But then so is this phony, IMO, violin in the first place.  I can't get over the idea that anyone would give a violin to a professional with the ONE THING IN THE WORLD that 100 years later would point to the ownership:  a silver plaque on the tail-piece saying, "For Wallace on the occasion of our engagement from Maria." (Not very well written or poetic.)  Considering how seldom this is done, what are the odds that this one violin has that?  When have any of us seen such a device?  Could I be wrong? I suppose so, but I enjoy rocking the boat.

 

And the hilarity of the various stories like the CT scan that shows similar damage to soaking a violin in sea water.  Does anyone really need a cat-scan? And that hide glue doesn't give in cold water.  Tell that to Weisshaar when you see him.   :)  (Of course, in fairness, perhaps the waters of the north Atlantic are colder than the waters off Los Angeles. 

 

Did someone really give over $I million for this violin?  Of course, heck, you can't even get a good Strad for that any more.

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The op edited his post so that mine didn't make sense anymore so I just deleted it.

 

A million pounds is about 2m dollars, without looking it up...

 

Actually if you go to encyclopedia-titanica you see there's more to the provenance than just the plaque.  But knowing how violins beg to be forged any way conceivable by man I will always have my doubts :)  You're right about the plaque -- It seems like such an unusual thing to do that it makes it seem more phony than genuine on the face of it.  It's documented they did pull out Wallace's body with a "music case" and that exists, and is like a big canvas bag that the fiddle could have fit in.  You know that if he had the fiddle on him during the last moments on the ship as is supposed to have been the situation and he saved the bag, he may well have put the fiddle in there.  You know he would have tried to save his fiddle before anything else.

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Breathes there a man...

 

I'm sure we all have the greatest respect for Hartley and many of us have played on a boat or two and have a real feeling of kinship those musicians.  I don't know if I'd feel better or worse if I was convinced the violin was absolutely right.

 

I remember a horrible event where the conductor for John Davidson got out of a burning venue but thought he should go back and gather up the music.  When he went back he didn't make it out again. (This is what I was told, but can't verify it.)  

 

I knew someone who was playing in the orchestra and he said that at first he and the rest of the musicians just sat there, even after someone announced the fire.  I blurted out, "Were you crazy?  Why did you do that?"  He said, "Well, no one told us we could leave." At first I thought that just about sums up musicians.  We are so beaten down that we'll do a lot to hold on to our jobs.  We don't want to cause any problems.  Or, perhaps it's just human nature.  Whatever, except for the conductor, the rest of the band did finally leave in time.  This was a New Year's Eve concert in Kentucky.

 

I can imagine the musicians on the Titanic might have felt caught between the desire for self preservation and the need to keep the boss happy.  We'll never know, but I wouldn't doubt it.

 

Anyway, what bothered me in all the articles I read about authenticating the violin was that the experts, methods, and logic just seemed fuzzy and amateurish.  Here is a recent example of promotional material:

 

http://www.titanicbranson.com/titanic-wallace-hartley-violin

 

 But who knows, since it's hard to believe someone would spend that kind of money on an iffy violin?

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 But who knows, since it's hard to believe someone would spend that kind of money on an iffy violin?

A sharp businessman might be able to spend $1.7m on it and make a profit charging people coming to see it because it cost $1.7m.  :)  The more it cost the more reliably genuine it's perceived to be...  Knowing Branson and Pigeon Forge, he might make his money back in a week...

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A sharp businessman might be able to spend $1.7m on it and make a profit charging people to see the it because it cost $1.7m.  :)  The more it cost the more reliably genuine it's perceived to be...  Knowing Branson and Pigeon Forge, he might make his money back in a week...

 

A really sharp business man will charge people to see it and to hear it ... 

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