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Hi

I have noticed  a problem I have(or maybe not) I never ever have to clean rosin off my fiddle no matter how much I apply or how much I play.

I know other playesr who seem to deposit large amounts of rosin each time they play. Is this lack of bow pressure?

 

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This is certainly a very interesting situation.  Many of us don't use a lot of rosin.  And then there are different rosins, of course.  But I don't think I've ever heard of someone not getting ANY rosin dust at all!!!  Why don't you tell us what brand you use; how many strokes when you apply it; and how often.  

 

I wouldn't worry about it.  In fact, the less dust to get on a violin, the better.  The only concern, IMO, is if you are happy with how your bows work and if you are happy with the feeling of the hair.  If you are happy with the tone and feel of the bow, why worry?

 

Are you also not getting a build up on the strings?

 

Anyway, it IS curious. 

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Some rosins deposit a lot of dust on the violin's top surface (z.b., Baker's and Magic), many other rosins I have tried deposit very little. Whichever result you have, rosin that can be seen to cling to the strings can change the way the strings vibrate - and with a positive aural result.

 

My practice has always been check my fiddle's surface below the strings and clean it regularly (including the fingerboard), wipe the strings after every session AND check my bow by a test wipe on my trousers (I always wear dark trousers) and apply a single back-and-forth swipe of rosin to the bow hair if it has not left a white trace on my pants (even a light trace is enough, as long as I can see it.)

 

Because rosin build-up on the strings is not good for sound (but because there must be some rosin coating on the strings for rosin to actually perform its function) rosin that powders off the strings and bow on to the violin is not a bad sign.

 

Andy

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Hi

I have noticed  a problem I have(or maybe not) I never ever have to clean rosin off my fiddle no matter how much I apply or how much I play.

I know other playesr who seem to deposit large amounts of rosin each time they play. Is this lack of bow pressure?

Yes, I notice too that some players are almost obsessive scrubbers of strings, and fiddle tops after every rehearsal, practice session.

I am a more private cleaner when at home and tend not to over-use rosin.

I'm sure if you take a cloth and scrape it strongly along the strings between the bridge and fingerboard,

apart from a sharp whistling sound you will surely remove a coating of caked rosin, evidence that indeed the rosin is being applied.

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I have switched to Andrea Solo violin and viola and really  like it.  I never thought changing rosin brands would make any real difference, but I do prefer it.  It seems more grabby and gives me a better feel.  Rosin type and amount is an individual choice, it it feels right to you and sounds right to you and others I think you have hit the mark, I would not worry.  I always clean off the top of my instrument everysingle time I play, It's just a good habit.  I also clean off my strings carefully I like them really cleaned off I really do not like build up on the strings, makes it very hard to get  clean attacks.  I have found some 100% cotton flannel that I cut up into instrument cloths that I like a lot, I bought a few yards of it at a fabric store and I may be set for life!

 

Respectfully,

 

DLB

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Yes, I notice too that some players are almost obsessive scrubbers of strings, and fiddle tops after every rehearsal, practice session.

I am a more private cleaner when at home and tend not to over-use rosin.

I'm sure if you take a cloth and scrape it strongly along the strings between the bridge and fingerboard,

apart from a sharp whistling sound you will surely remove a coating of caked rosin, evidence that indeed the rosin is being applied.

Good points.

 

I assume that somewhere on Maestronet cleaning has been discussed.  If not, it would make an important topic.

 

Over the years, I have seen two violinists who took a cloth and whacked the top with it.  Interestingly, both were South American, so I wonder if some noted violinist or teacher didn't instill this practice into students many years ago.

 

I assume the idea of whacking (I can't think of a better word) the cloth is that if, instead, you rub the cloth you are actually eroding the top by grinding the rosin into the varnish.

 

I don't see much reason to laboriously clean the rosin off after every single playing.  But maybe that depends on the type of rosin and climate.  If the rosin is going to "melt into" the varnish, it would be better to get it off.  But if it's just sitting there, loosely, then a few days worth rosin shouldn't be a worry.

 

—However, my opinion is not very scientific.   :)

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