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Sometimes you just need to get out of the shop for the day.


violins88
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Today I replaced my 1/4 inch bandsaw blade with a nice new one. I wanted a nice new one so I could do an accurate job of cutting the neck block. As I began to cut, I noticed little black dots appearing. "How strange." I thought. Kept cutting. Finally noticed some white smoke. Hmmm. What's that about? This must be some problematic wood. I stopped cutting. Turned off the saw. Hmmm. Oh... That's the problem, the blade in backwards. Need to turn it inside out and replace it. I bet I am the only one who has ever done that....... LOL.

In the process of replacing the blade, I pulled too hard on the lower guide. The metal piece broke. It's not steel, but some cheap aluminum alloy maybe, or something.

Time to take off the apron and go for a walk. This bandsaw is a Ridgid 14 inch model. It has given me lots of good service, except this is the second time that part has broken.

Ah, the walk in the dry sunny air feels good. The dog likes it too.

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haha, good idea to get out more.
A small workshop with plate glass windows in the Canadian rockies overlooking Canmore
would be nice though.

I bought nice new wheel rubbers for my Startrite Bandit thinking it would 'improve' things.
The old ones had been on since new, and I bought the saw 2nd hand for £50 22 years ago.
Was about to replace the old rubbers but realized when I had cleaned them with alcohol
that they were pretty much unworn, and thicker than the new ones, which amazed me. 

Only problem is the new rubbers which cost me £30. 
Anyone need a nice new set ?
 
~ If it ain't broke don't fix it. 

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I was just up in the Rockies a couple weeks ago; took the wife there for Valentine day weekend. We drove through the Yellowhead pass in rain with the temperature hovering just around +1C. I was kind of nervous because it was getting dark and thought it might freeze up, but we got through safely.

 

I have a 3/4" ripping blade for my 14" Delta saw. When sharp, it makes a nice straight cut perfect for neck blocks, top and back rips. For a long time I've been considering making a spacer block to increase my cutting depth to around 8 inches. Stock, I can rip about 6 and a quarter inches which isn't quite enough sometimes.

 

John, your new blade points might have been softened slightly if it was heating while running backwards.

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Was thinking of upgrading my band saw at some point, I know Delta are good. 

 

Delta WERE good. If you can find an old one, fine. The one I bought new 10 or 15 years ago was made in China and shows it. I've had to do a lot of work to make it decent. About that time a Delta rep told me that only the Unisaw (table saw) and the top band saw model were still made in US. I've heard since that all production has gone to China, and, of course, Delta has changed hands, bought I believe by Black and Decker. Key to performance is ultimately a truly sharp blade. New ones aren't always.

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I have a big old three wheeler Startrite with 12'' wheels Ben. It.s no problem to run a very small blade in it. I bought a batch of blades about a 18'' too long, and rather than sending them back, I cut and resoldered them. It's easy, and I have a lifetime supply of bowsaw blades. I'm going to buy rolls of blade in future and make them up as I need them.

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Ideally one would have a two wheel band saw of the quality that could take a 1/8th'' blade and still cut 

straight through a Cello scroll block.

 

Ben,

Keep a piece of candle or a block of beeswax handy, every 2-3 inches of cut just touch the blade with a little beeswax, and keep going.  An old candle works good.

 

I've considered getting a smaller motor pully, would reduce speed but add power.

 

Conor,

I wish I had saved my blades that have snapped for unknown reason -- had not considered just resoldering them.

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It's so frustrating when the equipment doesn't want to do what you expect it to do (for whatever reason).  Or when hubby doesn't do what you expect him to do (for whatever reason). <_<

 

I had a rather frustrating week.  So I bought a baby tortoise.  S/he's very relaxing.  Not a care in the world.  In fact, he promptly buried himself in the bedding in his new home and I haven't seen him since.  I keep checking on a seemingly empty enclosure.   I need to get myself in a Zen Tortoise mode...

 

Anyway...we needed to saw some plywood to size to fit the enclosure.  I tend to look after tools.  Hubby tends not to.  One never knows what to expect when one uses 'hubby's tools'... :ph34r:.  Which is why I have a lot of my own tools...but I can't justify having two sets of power tools.  I made him buy a table saw a couple of years ago.  It's still in the box.  It would have been very handy yesterday...but instead we made do....

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I have a big old three wheeler Startrite with 12'' wheels Ben. It.s no problem to run a very small blade in it. I bought a batch of blades about a 18'' too long, and rather than sending them back, I cut and resoldered them. It's easy, and I have a lifetime supply of bowsaw blades. I'm going to buy rolls of blade in future and make them up as I need them.

 would you mind going through how you do this? I have an odd size , what solder or braze? are you scarfing the ends ?

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Not Conor, but I do that a lot. Scarf the ends for much more surface area, use high temperature silver solder (actually a type of brazing) and suitable flux. I think you can still buy a kit of solder and flux from Ace Hardware. A propane torch is hot enough. Then you need a fixture to hold the blade in alignment while you braze. I made my own but several places used to sell them, with a starter supply of solder and flux. Haven't noticed lately.

 

It's a little trouble, but I once bought a bunch of new Delta 1/8" blades for $1 each that were a little too short. I cut one up to splice pieces in. Then I bought several partial rolls of various sizes at an auction. Mostly Starrett. I haven't bought a new blade in years and still have loads.

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I do exactly as Captainhook describes.

 

I got a little jig on ebay with a strip of  flat silver solder and some flux. It works very well, but you could make a jig up with a bit of angle iron and a few bolts on half an hour. I bevel the ends on the grinder, solder them, and dress the joint with a file. There are a few Youtube clips on the process.

 

I'm on the lookout for some coils of stock blade. They come in 100' rolls, but I'm not sure how to choose the best. If anyone can point me in the right direction I'd appreciate it.

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I'm not sure where to look, but I think Olson, Timberwolf and Starrett are good brands, among others. The only catalog I have now only shows pre-sized blades. I used to see coils listed, but don't remember where. They are most practical, of course, for the width and tooth pattern you use most, but you already know that. You might try a larger woodworking shop, if there is one close.They might be willing to sell a coil or two, or at least to order for you.

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