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Matt, with all you've explained, including having written the website promo yourself, I have a question:

Was the workshop completely and totally Don's idea, and you just helped him bring it to fruition? Or do you ever put the hustle on various kinds of vulnerable people, encouraging them to put on seminars, in order to bring business to your hotel/bed-and-breakfast?

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Meastonet Members,

 

Let me back track a few steps and attempt to revive the cadaver. 

  • I own the PineCrest Inn which will welcome the guests to Don's school.
  • I wrote the pages on the site.
  • I have never built a violin and am only "learning" to play.
  • I wrote the pages as I would write copy for any project I would promote.
  • If there was verbiage that you found questionable or objectionable, it was not due to Don Roy, but rather to my own attempt to write engaging copy.
  • And obviously it was engaging, but not as I anticipated.
 

FIrst: To set the record straight, we choose a photo found online on pages that stated it was part of the photo collection at the library of congress. It wasn't until Joe emailed us did we realize that it was associated with the LC in error. It was promptly removed and a personal apology was sent to Joe. Who if you don't know, makes killer finishes.

 

Second: There was no implied endorsement from the VSA intended or any sponsorship by the VSA intended. Don is a member and we were only describing where the castings originated from. After a discussion with Chris we removed those as well to ensure those reading did not assume anything unintentional.

 

Third: While reading your comments, I quickly made several text adjustments to better reflect our intentions. For those who have not read the pages since they were first posted, I would suggest perhaps you check them again. I am not above making corrections to better clarify our intentions.

 

And Lastly: I  certainly take full responsibility for the content. In my opinion, (a laymens opinion) if I were to work side by side with a very good violin maker, I would expect to make more than kindling. This course/workshop/school/guided build/session is an opportunity for anyone to build what should be a quality instrument. I will stand by that claim.

 

 

  • The instructor/student ratio is 1 to 4, although the web page says 5, we are debating that internally.
  • Students are not left to their own devises.
  • The course is not expensive in comparison to many. (We have secured assistance from a small group of consummate supporters to help lower the costs through other marketing and trades.) With a full scholarship of $1500, the course is only around $2500 for 4 weeks. What is 4 weeks of your time worth? A nearby Boston school is $25K for 40 weeks, or about $625 a week  or  $2500 per month.
  • Students can shop for tools and spend as little or as much as they want.
  • Students can use newer wood or upgrade to more rare and antique material.
  • Students can rent a house and cut costs from staying at an Inn with housekeeping and prepared meals.
 

I have found in my life that many people who have developed a craft or skill by accident and not by design often fully underestimate the value of their talents. They often are too afraid to ask what their skill is truly worth. If you a musician, you know exactly what I am saying. What is 10,000 hrs of practice worth?

 

And yes, we have outlined a very aggressive build window. We also have wood available that is between 200 and 250 years old. We have access to salvaged wood that was brought up from the bottom of rivers and dates back to when the King of England was harvesting trees throughout the state for his masts on his royal ships. At that time, anyone caught harvesting one of those trees was hung for treason. Our goal is to provide an experience AND a quality instrument and not hang you for treason.

 

I spent many hours reading the course descriptions at schools, Boston, Chicago and others. I looked at year long courses and three year long schools. Those are not what we are producing. One school I looked at starts with 6 weeks of learning to sharpen your knives. If that was me, I would slit my wrists after 6 weeks of sharpening with the knives I had just sharpened.

 

There is zero expectation that you will go home and build another violin but rather you may go home with a new found passion to learn more, accepting the challenge of creating something that might become a cherished heirloom to your children and grandchildren and in the end might actually be an amazing instrument. You may go home and find a local master to apprentice with.

 

I do find the need to defend Don, when the comments are really about text I wrote. If you read his bio, you might see a bit more about him. If you went to the pages early, you would have missed that altogether since most of you found the pages prior to them being fully loaded and published.

 

I was never our intention to cast a negative shadow towards the good work of others. It was never our intention on using someones pictures without permission. It was never our intention of misleading anyone.

 

If anyone was offended by our efforts, than I apologize.

 

Matt Mattingly AKA Just learning

www.pinecrestmaine.com

Matt,

Thanks for the clarification. I had suspected you had something to do with the Inn and website. As you've questioned about any further suggestions to your website, consider the following:

ViolaDM took a direct quote (Post #78) from your website which still remains there and quite frankly it is exceptionally distasteful. As you have admitted that you know nothing of this craft and trade, I'll tell you, throwing something together like "an old guy found a Stradivari in his attic...it's worth $7.5-$10 million dollars...when you leave our course, you'll leave with a Stradivari" is cringe worthy. No one will come anywhere close to leaving the course with their very own Stradivari.

You've made point of Joe's photo. As noted earlier, it is still on your website under the "Special Events" section

You mentioned this special wood you have access to. ADD THAT TO YOUR WEBSITE. It is an interesting story and could replace every mention of Stradivari, Guarneri and Guadagnini.

In general, shift very far away from the notion that attendees of the course are leaving with a "high-end instrument". With that, you leave yourself open to having the instrument taken to an actual authority for scrutiny and possibly put in a situition where you have to start making restitutions. You've never made an instrument and are just learning to play. You don't know what a "high-end" instrument is Matt. "Hand Crafted" is a lovely phrase.

Focus on the beautiful part of the country you're in. The fact folks can stay in your Inn and they'll be introduced to the world of violin making. The intimate, small class size. Btw, you mention a 1:4 instructor/student ratio and a max of 4 students but also mention your "professional staff" to help complete the instrument. If Mr. Roy is the only instructor, let folks know. 1:4 is a fine enough ratio.

Good luck with your business venture. Don't make it out to be more than it is.

DGSR☺

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Matt, with all you've explained, including having written the website promo yourself, I have a question:

Was the workshop completely and totally Don's idea, and you just helped him bring it to fruition? Or do you ever put the hustle on various kinds of vulnerable people, encouraging them to put on seminars, in order to bring business to your hotel/bed-and-breakfast?

Sorry David, But I won't participate in a discussion as you insinuated. I would take some offense at your assertion. We do not nor have ever "hustled" vulnerable people. Don has spoken about this idea for years and we have talked at length about it. Don isn't a promoter, he often refuses to even speak about the amazing things he has done. If i didn't drag it out of him, no one would know what an accomplished individual he is. I actually resent your implication.

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ViolaDM took a direct quote (Post #78) from your website which still remains there and quite frankly it is exceptionally distasteful. As you have admitted that you know nothing of this craft and trade, I'll tell you, throwing something together like "an old guy found a Stradivari in his attic...it's worth $7.5-$10 million dollars...when you leave our course, you'll leave with a Stradivari" is cringe worthy. No one will come anywhere close to leaving the course with their very own Stradivari.

You've made point of Joe's photo. As noted earlier, it is still on your website under the "Special Events" section

Thanks for your comments. I will look at what you have written in detail.

 

However the quote about the attic Stad, is quoted appropriately on our site as required, complete with reference and date. It sounds like you didn't actually read the quote.

 

I have interviewed dozens of musicians who play the instrument they built and each one has something in common. They tell me without prompting, what the instrument is modeled after. Which is where the "own your own strad" comes from. Yes it's a copy as one without question would understand. So, yes, they proudly tell me the have built a copy of a strad or another famous maker. But to to your point.  Perhaps, I can clarify, but that to me is getting in the weeds.

 

Also, the photo isn't there. You need to clear your cache in order to see the change. When on the page in question, just refresh your screen. The photo has fully been deleted even from my server.

 

Again, thanks for your comments. I will take each one under full consideration.

 

Matt

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Matt,

Thanks for the clarification. I had suspected you had something to do with the Inn and website. As you've questioned about any further suggestions to your website, consider the following:

ViolaDM took a direct quote (Post #78) from your website which still remains there and quite frankly it is exceptionally distasteful. As you have admitted that you know nothing of this craft and trade, I'll tell you, throwing something together like "an old guy found a Stradivari in his attic...it's worth $7.5-$10 million dollars...when you leave our course, you'll leave with a Stradivari" is cringe worthy. No one will come anywhere close to leaving the course with their very own Stradivari.

You've made point of Joe's photo. As noted earlier, it is still on your website under the "Special Events" section

You mentioned this special wood you have access to. ADD THAT TO YOUR WEBSITE. It is an interesting story and could replace every mention of Stradivari, Guarneri and Guadagnini.

In general, shift very far away from the notion that attendees of the course are leaving with a "high-end instrument". With that, you leave yourself open to having the instrument taken to an actual authority for scrutiny and possibly put in a situition where you have to start making restitutions. You've never made an instrument and are just learning to play. You don't know what a "high-end" instrument is Matt. "Hand Crafted" is a lovely phrase.

Focus on the beautiful part of the country you're in. The fact folks can stay in your Inn and they'll be introduced to the world of violin making. The intimate, small class size. Btw, you mention a 1:4 instructor/student ratio and a max of 4 students but also mention your "professional staff" to help complete the instrument. If Mr. Roy is the only instructor, let folks know. 1:4 is a fine enough ratio.

Good luck with your business venture. Don't make it out to be more than it is.

DGSR☺

As a participant in this thread, I would also like to thank you for the clarification.

 

Please take the very good advice given to you in the above post.

 

And please, when it comes to the monetary side of it, take a moment to think about the wisdom of comparing your "school" to well established, well respected schools around the country. These are schools with decades of proven success, devoted teachers, and proven methods of instruction. Were I you, I would be a little more circumspect in basing your price structure on the tuition of these schools. 

For a first time venture, it's a lot of money to take from people.

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Meastonet Members,

 

Let me back track a few steps and attempt to revive the cadaver. 

  • I own the PineCrest Inn which will welcome the guests to Don's school.
  • I wrote the pages on the site.
  • I have never built a violin and am only "learning" to play.
  • I wrote the pages as I would write copy for any project I would promote.
  • If there was verbiage that you found questionable or objectionable, it was not due to Don Roy, but rather to my own attempt to write engaging copy.
  • And obviously it was engaging, but not as I anticipated.

 

FIrst: To set the record straight, we choose a photo found online on pages that stated it was part of the photo collection at the library of congress. It wasn't until Joe emailed us did we realize that it was associated with the LC in error. It was promptly removed and a personal apology was sent to Joe. Who if you don't know, makes killer finishes.

 

Second: There was no implied endorsement from the VSA intended or any sponsorship by the VSA intended. Don is a member and we were only describing where the castings originated from. After a discussion with Chris we removed those as well to ensure those reading did not assume anything unintentional.

 

Third: While reading your comments, I quickly made several text adjustments to better reflect our intentions. For those who have not read the pages since they were first posted, I would suggest perhaps you check them again. I am not above making corrections to better clarify our intentions.

 

And Lastly: I  certainly take full responsibility for the content. In my opinion, (a laymens opinion) if I were to work side by side with a very good violin maker, I would expect to make more than kindling. This course/workshop/school/guided build/session is an opportunity for anyone to build what should be a quality instrument. I will stand by that claim.

 

 

  • The instructor/student ratio is 1 to 4, although the web page says 5, we are debating that internally.
  • Students are not left to their own devises.
  • The course is not expensive in comparison to many. (We have secured assistance from a small group of consummate supporters to help lower the costs through other marketing and trades.) With a full scholarship of $1500, the course is only around $2500 for 4 weeks. What is 4 weeks of your time worth? A nearby Boston school is $25K for 40 weeks, or about $625 a week  or  $2500 per month.
  • Students can shop for tools and spend as little or as much as they want.
  • Students can use newer wood or upgrade to more rare and antique material.
  • Students can rent a house and cut costs from staying at an Inn with housekeeping and prepared meals.

 

I have found in my life that many people who have developed a craft or skill by accident and not by design often fully underestimate the value of their talents. They often are too afraid to ask what their skill is truly worth. If you a musician, you know exactly what I am saying. What is 10,000 hrs of practice worth?

 

And yes, we have outlined a very aggressive build window. We also have wood available that is between 200 and 250 years old. We have access to salvaged wood that was brought up from the bottom of rivers and dates back to when the King of England was harvesting trees throughout the state for his masts on his royal ships. At that time, anyone caught harvesting one of those trees was hung for treason. Our goal is to provide an experience AND a quality instrument and not hang you for treason.

 

I spent many hours reading the course descriptions at schools, Boston, Chicago and others. I looked at year long courses and three year long schools. Those are not what we are producing. One school I looked at starts with 6 weeks of learning to sharpen your knives. If that was me, I would slit my wrists after 6 weeks of sharpening with the knives I had just sharpened.

 

There is zero expectation that you will go home and build another violin but rather you may go home with a new found passion to learn more, accepting the challenge of creating something that might become a cherished heirloom to your children and grandchildren and in the end might actually be an amazing instrument. You may go home and find a local master to apprentice with.

 

I do find the need to defend Don, when the comments are really about text I wrote. If you read his bio, you might see a bit more about him. If you went to the pages early, you would have missed that altogether since most of you found the pages prior to them being fully loaded and published.

 

I was never our intention to cast a negative shadow towards the good work of others. It was never our intention on using someones pictures without permission. It was never our intention of misleading anyone.

 

If anyone was offended by our efforts, than I apologize.

 

Matt Mattingly AKA Just learning

www.pinecrestmaine.com

demon18.gifOkay, looks to me like we have two very confusing things going on here.

 

One is that a luthier, known as such to some of the folks on the board, got blindsided by an overly aggressive (and technically challenged) marketing copywriter.  He has my sympathy on that count.  Usually you have to be an engineer in a large corporation to have that thrilling experience.  He might be advised to post his original concept as he envisioned it, for the enlightenment of his peers.

 

The other, IMHO, has to do with the underlying dynamics of the concept as presented above.  Hate to break it to you, that ain't a violin maker's school, it's a carefully shepherded, failure-free, violin building experience.  That should put it in the same category as "extreme adventure" vendors such as the "Fighter Pilot For a Day!!" outfits, etc., selling high-priced thrills to wannabes.  While I find doing something like this with violins a rather bizarre idea, if marketed as what it is, it's not wrong in itself, just yet another dumb way to spend your money in a free, capitalist, society. free-happy-smileys-322.gif

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I was wondering about the tuition fee too...and what the parameters were.

And who the intended "students" are.

Retired people?

That's my guess.  Notice what I said earlier:

 

................................

I sat most of this out (not seeing myself as "having a dog in the fight"), to let the pro heavyweights vent at what seemed to be one of their own who'd annoyed them, but several re-readings of the website have convinced me that the amateur community on MN (retirees with means, in particular) has a serious grievance with Mr. Roy Mattingly as well.  We're the obvious targets of his "violin school" advertising, and comparing his offering with the various alternatives available makes me feel that, IMHO, it is not the best choice to spend that kind of money on.  He also appears, from the claims made, to consider us gullible "marks", something that I find personally offensive.    :angry:  

 

If anyone has attended this amusement, when you finished your fiddle, how did it soundcelestial_girl.gif

 

I'll note that seven grand or so, cunningly spent on eBay, could get you over 50 violins to work on.  In my experience, not all would be dogs, and a few would end up worth more than you spent total.  The hundreds of hours of experience gained, plus the opportunity to handle and examine a large number of (admittedly mostly unimpressive) violins seems to me the better bargain.  :)

 

Gee, now there's an idea.  The Violadamore Rubbishmeister and Sarcasm Academy.  Any potential subscribers?  :lol:

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Let me get back to you after I finish relabeling the contents of my wine cellar.  ;)  :ph34r:

Hey maybe we could do a Spike Lee Joint crowdfunded flashmob Iphone kinda thing where I could piggy back onto your program and offer low cost extended bifrontal craniotomys and offer complete kitchen remodels in a mere 3 days!

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Mr. Mattingly,

You do not seem to be getting this.

There is no valid comparison to what you are trying to do with your course to any legitimate violin making school anywhere. Comparing tuition prices from real schools that have bona fide curriculum and instructors is not valid. Further, you quote comparisons after some poor sap has come to you for a "scholarship".... so you charge obscenely too much for half assed training but if they ask really really nicely you will only charge outrageously too much for half assed training?

Also, you are a business man. Claiming ignorance about using copyrighted material or claiming your use of the VSA was not intended as endorsement (you left out Oberlin, wonder why?) is bold, perhaps you were also ignorant about the gullibility of your intended audience here on MN.

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Thanks for your comments. I will look at what you have written in detail.

 

However the quote about the attic Stad, is quoted appropriately on our site as required, complete with reference and date. It sounds like you didn't actually read the quote.

 

I have interviewed dozens of musicians who play the instrument they built and each one has something in common. They tell me without prompting, what the instrument is modeled after. Which is where the "own your own strad" comes from. Yes it's a copy as one without question would understand. So, yes, they proudly tell me the have built a copy of a strad or another famous maker. But to to your point.  Perhaps, I can clarify, but that to me is getting in the weeds.

 

Also, the photo isn't there. You need to clear your cache in order to see the change. When on the page in question, just refresh your screen. The photo has fully been deleted even from my server.

 

Again, thanks for your comments. I will take each one under full consideration.

 

Matt

Matt,

Thank-you again for the clear-up of Joe's photo. My apologies.

After these following notes, I'll take my leave of this topic.

You have a few pages linked. Personally, I see no point in the page where you go into the works of Stradivari, Guarneri and Guadagnini. Of the 20 or so paragraphs on that main topic page, 2 are in actual reference to the course. You could reference these 3 fine makers and the casts the students have access to in a single paragraph. "Students will get the opportunity to work with castings of 3 instruments made by the noted Italian Master Luthiers; Antonio Stradivari, Giuseppe Guarneri and G. B. Guadagnini.". Since there is so little in reference to the course, you could combine the "Maine Violin School" page and the "Tuition, Room..." page into one page actually pertaining to the course.

The quote. I read the quote. I know the quote and I'll just leave you with this: Member's of the Stradivari family made "Stradivari" instruments. Everyone else since has made an instrument modeled after, in the style of, inspired by or based on the work of Stradivari. As you've noted by talking to dozens of musicians, they have "copies" of a Strad, a Guarneri, a Guadagnini etc etc...there is a brick wall 100 feet thick and 1000 miles tall between a Stradivari and a copy of one. This is not even to say the Stradivari is with necessity the better instrument but there is an exceptionally divided line between the two.

You have a romantic story about a nice retreat destination, interesting material usages, and an intimate tutelage opportunity right at your fingertips. Go with that. As noted by others, this is not comparable in any way to the fine violin making schools you have referenced but rather, it IS a unique opportunity on its own. Tell the potential course attendees of its uniqueness. There is a body of individuals that eat, sleep and breath bowed instruments that are telling you there is something you're not really getting here. Heed this advise.

Good luck in your business venture.

DGSR☺

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Gee, now there's an idea.  The Violadamore Rubbishmeister and Sarcasm Academy.  Any potential subscribers?  :lol:

Violadamore, there could also be a "Pro Violinmaker Fantasy Camp".

Instead of nice accommodations, nice food and wine, a greater sense of realism would be achieved by having participants  live in bare-bones housing, eat cooked cabbage with a few weenie slices for meals (with the exception of gruel for breakfast), and drink Ripple wine. And to further "keep it real", there could be fun excursions to re-use centers and thrift shops. :D

 

If this works out, perhaps a "Dealer Fantasy Camp" could be added down the road, where participants can choose names like Dietmar. ;)

 

Or maybe a Bow Rehairer Fantasy Camp. Let's face it, there are only two kinds of people in the world: Those who are in our profession, and those who desperately wish they were. B):lol:

 

So many possibilities, so little time.

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............people like me taking a break from their regular work for a couple of years would be a third kind of person in the world.

Why, when you could experience the hardship, deprivation and frustration in a much shorter time, at Violinmaker Fantasy Camp?

Of course, either way you go, you'll always be running into lots of rabid  violinmaker groupies. Naturally, that's why most of us got into it,  :)

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Not for me, no thank you.  I thought a little about what if I were to try teaching 4 students at one time.  I see one, maybe two students adapting well enough to keep the program progressing.  The other two could possibly slow things down with lack of confidence, strength, or even a mental issue of sorts coming into play.  I do think it is great some of you guys can do your time with violins and draw a pension afterwards- pretty good.

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Not for me, no thank you.  I thought a little about what if I were to try teaching 4 students at one time.  I see one, maybe two students adapting well enough to keep the program progressing.  The other two could possibly slow things down with lack of confidence, strength, or even a mental issue of sorts coming into play.  I do think it is great some of you guys can do your time with violins and draw a pension afterwards- pretty good.

Pension?????

 

Besides, our idea for Violin Fantasy Camp is still in the formative stages, and it hasn't been decided yet whether there will be any actual teaching. It might be better for participants if we heap on enough hardship and abuse, that attendees will hate it, and move on to something safer, more profitable and socially acceptable, like stamp collecting. ;)

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Pension?????

Stamp collecting isn't the direction to head, though if I sold all of my valuable ones I might get a tank of gas out of it.  I'm thinking as soon as the attendees see the first ribs being bent to form they'll be hooked.  What can you do to stop that?   Maybe Matt or Roy will offer to buy back any instruments afterwards, making the pain less painful.

 

Besides, our idea for Violin Fantasy Camp is still in the formative stages, and it hasn't been decided yet whether there will be any actual teaching. It might be better for participants if we heap on enough hardship and abuse, that attendees will hate it, and move on to something safer, more profitable and socially acceptable, like stamp collecting. ;)

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Violadamore, there could also be a "Pro Violinmaker Fantasy Camp".

Instead of nice accommodations, nice food and wine, a greater sense of realism would be achieved by having participants  live in bare-bones housing, eat cooked cabbage with a few weenie slices for meals (with the exception of gruel for breakfast), and drink Ripple wine. And to further "keep it real", there could be fun excursions to re-use centers and thrift shops. :D

 

 

 

Bravo.

 

The idea of having a "camp" in Cremona has crossed my mind.  Put us up  in a house similar to the one Strad lived and worked in, without air conditioning, electricity, or band saws; it might be a healthy revelation for many of us.  Imagine a month without hair shampoo, sleeping in corners or six to a room, sour clothing, bed pans, and locked in at night with candles and maybe a Bible.  It might make better makers of all of us.

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...toss in some lice...rats...fleas... ^_^

Fleas and lice cost extra; we don't want to make the experience prohibitively expensive.   :)   However, rats can be caught during carefully conducted field trips which some participants find preferable to being locked in with candles and possibly a Bible.

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Bravo.

 

The idea of having a "camp" in Cremona has crossed my mind.  Put us up  in a house similar to the one Strad lived and worked in, without air conditioning, electricity, or band saws; it might be a healthy revelation for many of us.  Imagine a month without hair shampoo, sleeping in corners or six to a room, sour clothing, bed pans, and locked in at night with candles and maybe a Bible.  It might make better makers of all of us.

It doesn't seem to help.

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You have a few pages linked. Personally, I see no point in the page where you go into the works of Stradivari, Guarneri and Guadagnini. Of the 20 or so paragraphs on that main topic page, 2 are in actual reference to the course. You could reference these 3 fine makers and the casts the students have access to in a single paragraph. "Students will get the opportunity to work with castings of 3 instruments made by the noted Italian Master Luthiers; Antonio Stradivari, Giuseppe Guarneri and G. B. Guadagnini.". Since there is so little in reference to the course, you could combine the "Maine Violin School" page and the "Tuition, Room..." page into one page actually pertaining to the course.

The quote. I read the quote. I know the quote and I'll just leave you with this: Member's of the Stradivari family made "Stradivari" instruments. Everyone else since has made an instrument modeled after, in the style of, inspired by or based on the work of Stradivari. As you've noted by talking to dozens of musicians, they have "copies" of a Strad, a Guarneri, a Guadagnini etc etc...there is a brick wall 100 feet thick and 1000 miles tall between a Stradivari and a copy of one. This is not even to say the Stradivari is with necessity the better instrument but there is an exceptionally divided line between the two.

Thanks for the arrangement notes. I'll take a look at that. I originally included the three stories because I thought they were interesting. My thought is if you are going to model an instrument after one of those three greats, then having a story to go along with your instrument will make it that much more interesting. But I have heard your comments and will continue to work the text and layouts. But you are correct about the difference between the copy and original.

 

When I develop a weekend getaway package or even a month long violin building getaway package, the experience is always what is important. Does the guest want to hike up a mountain and find a moose, or sail 30 miles out into the gulf of Maine looking for a whale.

 

The first time builder isn't just making a violin, they are building a personal relationship with their instrument. The wood they might choose has a story, the original violin has a story, their experience of building it becomes another story. Each little tool mark left in the grain will remind them of their story. Some may not like it, but that's what we sell. I have been a professional musician for 40 years. The grand piano in my dining room tells me a story every time I sit and write something new. It speaks to me. I have moved it 1000 miles over the years, she's old and tired but we still can play together. What is it worth? Not much, but the story it has to tell is priceless.

 

For the consummate naysayer: Every student that has come through Don's workshop/school has returned to make a second. Every one! That's over 50 students who have returned. Maybe by your standards that's not much. My return guest rate here at the Inn is only about 40%, so that to me says a great deal. Some of his students complete an instrument in 6 weeks some 3 years. Until now, each progresses at their own rate and as they have time. And many have built their instruments for the cost of wood alone. Those who continue to harp on price should understand cost has nothing to do with it. A tourist can stay at my Inn for $140 a night or they can stay 20 minutes away in a flea bag motel with sand all over the carpet for $240 a night but be walking distance to the ocean. Does that mean their guest room is better than mine only because it's more expensive? I hardly think so.

 

As for the comments of being a professional: I don't think the Kennedy Center would have invited Don back for a second performance if he wasn't doing something right, nor would the Lincoln Center nor would Carnegie Hall. Don doesn't need to prove anything to anyone and I always question those who seem to do so. The real pro's don't need to tell you, they show you.

 

As for Mr. Pacewicz - I am thinking he suffers from a bad case of bow envy.

 

IMHO

 

Matt Mattingly

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