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Male and Female Trees?


Omobono
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In the brief article on Lupot in the February 2016 Strad mention is made of the treatise of Abbe Sébastien Sibere "The Perfect Violin-Maker'(La Chélonomie, ou, Le parfait luthier) of 1806 where he reportedly suggests that wood must be carefully chosen, the wood of 'female trees' being more pliable. I can't recall having heard such a thing before.

(He also claime dto have rediscovered the secret of Cremonese varnish ... so perhaps to be taken with a grain of salt?)

 

A question for you dendrologists...........

Can one gauge the sex of the tree from timber that has been felled?

 

I have heard or read that there is a difference too between make and female horse hair, but that's an entirely different matter......... :)

 

 

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In the brief article on Lupot in the February 2016 Strad mention is made of the treatise of Abbe Sébastien Sibere "The Perfect Violin-Maker'(La Chélonomie, ou, Le parfait luthier) of 1806 where he reportedly suggests that wood must be carefully chosen, the wood of 'female trees' being more pliable. I can't recall having heard such a thing before.

(He also claime dto have rediscovered the secret of Cremonese varnish ... so perhaps to be taken with a grain of salt?)

 

A question for you dendrologists...........

Can one gauge the sex of the tree from timber that has been felled?

 

I have heard or read that there is a difference too between make and female horse hair, but that's an entirely different matter......... :)

Hi,

It is true that some species of trees have a male and female variety, I'm certain holly is one of them and yew is another. Some trees have male and female flowers, others rely on wind and insect pollination.

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Because "Each spruce tree carries male and female cones."

http://homeguides.sfgate.com/spruce-tree-reproduction-seeds-44386.html

and therefore is a hermaphrodite,

that's all definitely bare nonsense.

 

Possibly in Transsylvania it's different somehow, they might need different stakes for male and female vampires. :angry:

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In the brief article on Lupot in the February 2016 Strad mention is made of the treatise of Abbe Sébastien Sibere "The Perfect Violin-Maker'(La Chélonomie, ou, Le parfait luthier) of 1806 where he reportedly suggests that wood must be carefully chosen, the wood of 'female trees' being more pliable. I can't recall having heard such a thing before.

(He also claime dto have rediscovered the secret of Cremonese varnish ... so perhaps to be taken with a grain of salt?)

 

A question for you dendrologists...........

Can one gauge the sex of the tree from timber that has been felled?

 

I have heard or read that there is a difference too between make and female horse hair, but that's an entirely different matter......... :)

Spruce trees are both male and female in one tree (monoecious). The female cone is the large cone we see and the male cone is small and releases pollen. I don't know if it is the case with Norway Spruce trees (Picea abies) but often trees cannot fertilize themselves (autogamy) but must have a second tree or trees nearby.

 

Maschiatura and masculine spruce are common names that do not reflect the reality of the tree. Bearclaw is a characteristic found in Picea abies and not in Abies alba, for example. Bear claw in Italian is technically called indentatura like a pattern of dents.

 

Some types of maple are monoecious (containing both sexes in one tree) others are dioecious (one sex only).

 

Acer pseudoplatanus is monoecious (both sexes).

 

Perhaps Abbé Sibire was talking through his hat. :lol:

 

Bruce

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An explicit essay about "tree sex" can be found here

Tree Sex: Gender & Reproductive Strategies - Warnell ...

including tables about sexual strategies (table 2) and "Dominant sexual strategies of major tree genera and species" (table 4).

 

Picea species appear to be exclusively monoecious, while Acer species can have very different strategies of reproduction.

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An explicit essay about "tree sex" can be found here

Tree Sex: Gender & Reproductive Strategies - Warnell ...

including tables about sexual strategies (table 2) and "Dominant sexual strategies of major tree genera and species" (table 4).

 

Picea species appear to be exclusively monoecious, while Acer species can have very different strategies of reproduction.

Thanks much for the link.  :)   BTW, just when you feel that you understand all this, you'll find that a good many trees also reproduce asexually, producing clones off their root system, and scattering saplings all over the yard, though never a seed is seen.  :lol:

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In Portland we now have parks that have been set up exclusively for trees that are transitioning from one sex to the other.

 

Must be teenage maple ;)

 

"For example, in the maple Acer pennsylvanicum, 10% of young sexually mature trees in the

understory of a forest changed sex from year to year."

(Page 5 of the linked essay)

 

Furthermore "The maple genus (Acer) contains cosexual, monoecious, and dioecious species and individuals.

Most maple species are called andropolygamous with many male trees and some andromonoecious (male

and cosexual flowers) trees. In addition to functional flowers, some maple species (i.e. Acer platanoides

and Acer pseudoplatanus) generate flowers without any sex organs (asexual flowers).

(Page 6)

 

Human nature is somehow narrow and limited. :rolleyes:

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Thanks much for the link.  :)   BTW, just when you feel that you understand all this, you'll find that a good many trees also reproduce asexually, producing clones off their root system, and scattering saplings all over the yard, though never a seed is seen.  :lol:

And this is the reason that even if it's called Norway spruce and we have a lot of it here, I can't go up in the mountain and expect to find some for my fiddles. As the climate in the norwegian mountains is too cold, they are prepared to reproduce with cloning through their lower branches.

Branches are sitting too low on the trunk to leave any room for violin wood. :(

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Spruce trees are both male and female in one tree (monoecious). The female cone is the large cone we see and the male cone is small and releases pollen. I don't know if it is the case with Norway Spruce trees (Picea abies) but often trees cannot fertilize themselves (autogamy) but must have a second tree or trees nearby.

Thanks, Bruce. 

The question was put 'tongue in cheek' as you guessed.

Are spruce trees monogamous - or should that be 'mahogonous'?  <_<

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