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uncle duke

the long awaited pudding

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I am glad to see a familiar plant pictured with your tools. That's terrific. Any thoughts about our local variety of the equisetum genus?

Did you make these 5 instruments out of the Petherick and Wake books, or do varnish and setup only? Not sure what I'm seeing but either way that is quite a feat. I really like the plain figure slab cut backs, where are they from?

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I am glad to see a familiar plant pictured with your tools. That's terrific. Any thoughts about our local variety of the equisetum genus?

Did you make these 5 instruments out of the Petherick and Wake books, or do varnish and setup only? Not sure what I'm seeing but either way that is quite a feat. I really like the plain figure slab cut backs, where are they from?

I found a stand of the stuff growing recently but the instruments were already finished.  I did use a few pieces to smooth a neck after removing wood to make it smaller.  Smoothed it out real nice.

 

I have a few hiding behind the ones you can see.  There's actually eight of them there.  No books were used for these builds.  All were made from information garnered from various websites.  The main plan was drawn up using the math method from Otto's work written before his time.  Tyrolean-Brescian-Viennese 1700's.  That was used for a 4/4 plan.  The last six builds were 7/8th's size builds.  So I cut down a 4/4 plexi-glas template down to 7/8th size retaining the 4/4 c-bout area for the most part.

 

Everything woodwise and accessory wise was all made from scratch except the tailgut, strings, fine tuners and endpins.  Varnish and coloring is a secret :), but it is an oil.

 

I was afraid the camera would let me down.  Those are wedges cut for two piece backs, all of them.  The spalted piece was a 1 1/4" x 16"? x 5", if I remember right, that was sawn diagonal with one wedge piece being flipped around to make a back.  Not really the way to do it but I needed to see if I could make something functionable playing wise as a violin.  I used a piece of non figured red maple for one build.  The six 7/8th sze builds were from an entire round of some kind of maple.  If it's silver maple it was from a hardy growing tree.  The wood was harder to work than the spalted piece I used which was from silver maple. 

 

I would like to see your husbands violin sell to whomever may need it.  It would give hope to the trade around these parts, from a hobbiest-hack's point of view, good luck.   

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You have been very productive!  :)

 

There is still time to put in a sound clip for us too!  ^_^

http://www.maestronet.com/forum/index.php?/topic/333694-seasons-greetingschallenge/page-6

Is was a decision I had to make at the time- do I want to do this now while I'm in my forties or do I wait until I'm older to try.  Wasn't sure what the future holds so I started when I did.

 

I'm a mess in regards to playing lately.  I have been teaching myself De Beriot studies part 1.  Who could of thought something so elementary would be difficult to try on a violin?  That and trying to work Preludio and Allegro into the mix is making me a better player technically but it is time consuming.

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Looks like you need more light!  Or a tripod.  The one photo shows it as a mandoviolin.   Do the molds come apart?  They look huge.  Everyones overhangs, and edgework always look better than mine.  It has very full arching for a del Gesu.   Is that one of the ones that has the long arch that is very flat almost to the middle of the bouts?  I hate taking photos because they never show what I'm seeing.  Stupid cameras.  I've seen all those colors on my photos, and the instruments look nothing like the photo.  I'm guessing the reality is more like the nice assortment you had on the first post. Like the second one down, and the last one, with a bit of red and gold popping through.

You make your own pegs and tailpieces?  Very cool.  Nice job.

Ok now.  What's wrong with the back?  Your others looked great.

 

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47 minutes ago, Ken_N said:

1.  Looks like you need more light!  Or a tripod.  The one photo shows it as a mandoviolin.    

2.  Do the molds come apart?  They look huge.  

3.  Everyones overhangs, and edgework always look better than mine.  

4.  It has very full arching for a del Gesu.   Is that one of the ones that has the long arch that is very flat almost to the middle of the bouts?

5.   I hate taking photos because they never show what I'm seeing.  Stupid cameras.  I've seen all those colors on my photos, and the instruments look nothing like the photo.  I'm guessing the reality is more like the nice assortment you had on the first post. Like the second one down, and the last one, with a bit of red and gold popping through.

6.  You make your own pegs and tailpieces?  Very cool.  Nice job.

7.  Ok now.  What's wrong with the back?  Your others looked great.

1.  I had plenty of light.  Yes,  a tripod would really, really help.  You put it mildly - my son was saying something along the lines of "how could an older version of me be so dumb?"  I did notice the mandoviolin image too.  Lack of tripod use there, sorry.

2.  Yes they come apart.  Total thickness is around 29mm or close to that.  A two piece mold should be lower in width than the ribs being used - not sure what would happen if the mold would be made as high as the ribs being used.   The half template for this particular D.G. has measurements of 345mm length, just a hair over 100mm for the lower bout width, 51.5mm for the narrowest part of the c-bout width and 77 3/4mm for the upper bout width.

3.  There may be a difference of performance between the one piece mold vs the two piece mold here.  Firstly, determine and finish the exact outline of the instrument and then what I do is determine purling groove location and lower the plate edges to well under 5mm but above 4mm.  Then I probably remark/check everything again before using a router for the groove - two passes, sometimes three all the while praying for acceptable results - that's hard to do and get.  After purfling is dry level it down some and then draw/scribe the line all around the plate that separates the outer purfling line from the what should be the already made outer edge.  While gouging the purfling down I don't dare cross the newly scribed/penciled line all the while keeping the upslope to the inflection area in good condition while removing wood via gouging.  For edges it's just a matter of removing tangents of edge wood and blending together all the while keeping an eye on the scribed/drawn line between purfling and edge.   I use a 3/8 - #9 gouge for all of the gouge work in the purfling area.  That size gouge takes longer to get decent results but it also stays sharper longer for me too.  Small scrapers are needed eventually too.

4.       I like the arch contours for the back plate better than the belly contours but yes I do think this is a plan that says to run the contours farther in while working the belly - it is sorta flat across the bridge area.  The back contours, I think, can be called the "perfect plan".  It was a plan available on the internet up for grabs for whomever may need it but these days it's almost impossible to find again or at the least I haven't run across it lately.

5.  It is a simple, cheap camera to use but tripod use could enable better photos for me.  Believe it or not,  the last photo represents the shades the best excepting the alizariny looking purple/magenta - that should be more towards the brown madder shade, it's close though.  Ignore what you see of oranges and yellows.....that's just the lights or camera doing that.

6.  You were the inspiration for my attempting peg making.  At the time I needed 24 pegs.  At the time I almost gave up after several attempts but gave it one more last shot and came up with an acceptable peg........then I made another two dozen - very difficult for me.   Making chinrests are almost a no-brainer and tailpiece making isn't bad either.  I purchase the endpins - enough is enough. 

7.. The backs are a better wood than the others but are from the same log I used before.  These pieces were browner/pinker/harder than the rest used from previous making attempts.  Very slight figure with some mineral streaking is all.  One day I'll procure the good stuff for violin making again but  these days I can hear the words from Mr. Molnar saying to me  "save it for retirement boy". - sounds like a good idea. 

 

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Lighting is fine.  To me the focus issues seem to be lack of focus, rathwr than motion blur.  Check your autofocus function, or manually focus on what you want. 

That said, more light would give deeper field, so focus would be less critical/dramatic.  

Beautiful work where it counts:  the instruments. :-)

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