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Roger Hargrave

New Bowmakers Book

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I have just heard that John Stagg has published a new book this last week. It’s about bow making and repair. It is limited to 400 copies only. This is not a lot since I also heard that 175 have already gone. I am not a bow maker myself; I cannot even do a reasonable re-hair, but I have known John since we worked together at Hills. He is one of the few remaining Hill-trained bow makers. Since I don't remember a new book about bow making and related stuff, at least not since Joseph Kun's and that's decades ago, I thought I might give it a try. I am personally interested, mainly because it is illustrated with drawings only, which I think is a good move. I am probably going to do that for my next publication. The blurb says that the book “is primarily intended for aspiring bow makers, commercial repairers and those conversant with the subject in general, but that it should also provide others with some insight into the numerous processes involved in hand-crafting a bow from scratch, together with some  explanation of the complex repairs that are possible.”

Has anyone seen it?

 

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Has anyone seen it?

 

No, I haven't.

T- but thanks for the 'heads up' Roger.

 

I do have then Kun bow making book, which is  a great book for machinists and power tool guys.

And I do mean that it's a very complete and fully illustrated guide.  (the Kun book, that is)

I'd love to see this book, but I am going to suppose that it is above my financial state right now.

And, the main reason I'd like to see it, is because I would like to compare what he's saying, to what I'm learning now.

 

Not that I would change a thing that I'm doing and learning now...

but it is always interesting at least, to see how someone else goes about their business.

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I would like one.  Let me know if you find a leak.

 

dlb

 

Hey Dwight... perhaps if you eventually find and buy a copy - we can have a "Stagg party" of sorts?

 

( - ok, I'm sorry, I'll go now)

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I do have then Kun bow making book '

I'd like to buy a copy if it's available. 
Kun was a perfectionist, won medals for violins and bows, used to go mushroom hunting and didn't drink coffee when working. 

Visited Stagg's Bristol workshop in '95 and he showed what the sweat from his hands did to the iron planes. 

Found this interesting, so few tools needed :

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I like the book.  His general approach is very English (of course), but he does mention variations seen in other traditions--especially French.  Many hints and tips about making, as well as repair methods. He describes some relatively obscure techniques, such as working with whalebone and tortoiseshell, making a Vuillaume-style rounded ferrule, and making and fitting a Hill-style "bottomless" frog. All of the diagrams are carefully drawn--no in-process photos at all. I don't know whether anyone could make a bow by simply reading this book, but it's certainly a worthwhile resource. And there's a bit of history about his time at Hills, near the end, where he mentions Mr. Hargrave.

 

www.johnstaggbows.co.uk

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Hi all. I am the author of " Bow Making and Repair", recently published.

Apology first - I am having my website updated, hopefully to include a page about the book, but some technical gremlins have delayed matters.

If anyone has any questions they would like to ask then please email me (email addresses are on the website).

 

John Stagg

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And there's a bit of history about his time at Hills, near the end, where he mentions Mr. Hargrave.

 

www.johnstaggbows.co.uk

Thanks Rob. If I'm mentioned it must be good. I also need to find out where it is available and I'll let you know. After I've bought my copy. John if you read this please post the info.

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Brad, if you are watching...

 

At 11:41, he separates the metal from the shell portion of the slide...

The metal portion then gets joined to the back strap, the heel, and the shell portion becomes the sliding part, and the silver becomes a permanent part of the frog..

That they are made the way we're talking about, simply has them become EXACTLY the same width, so that they match perfectly.

I'm hoping that sawing them apart, will take care of the slight discrepancy in their matching faces...

Frogs no.'s 2, 3 & 4 won't have that "problem"...

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You can email John at

 

john@johnstaggbows.co.uk

 

UK 0117 925 4538

 

I called and ordered and paid for the book over the phone. Daughter is currently reading it, so I've only skimmed it right now. Well worth the money, which for any book in this genre is cheap.

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I called and ordered and paid for the book over the phone. Daughter is currently reading it, so I've only skimmed it right now. Well worth the money, which for any book in this genre is cheap.

 

How much is it?

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I also like the fact that he apparently makes his bows (and the frog) with no great machinery - but just a hand powered "spindle"...

I like that too. I make bow some times, it's not really necessary any machinery, one can make a bow with a few hand tools in a small space.

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Like I said earlier I am not a bow maker, but I just received the book and although I have not yet finished reading read it, so far I would say that it is excellent value. A labour of love.

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Like I said earlier I am not a bow maker, but I just received the book and although I have not yet finished reading read it, so far I would say that it is excellent value. A labour of love.

That's cool.

I've heard it said so many times that stuff from the Hill and Wurlitzer (and Weisshaar) shops don't represent the latest state of the art. But without understanding our background, how can we put advances into context?

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I got mine and it's excellent.  It gives very clear descriptions and drawings of everything to do with making and repairing bows, with an emphasis on the English techniques.  It also has an interesting section on life and work for bowmakers at the Hill shop, which I have not seen anywhere else.  It cost 79 pounds, including shipping to the US.  Mine is number 100 out of an edition of 400, signed by the author!   Thank you Mr. Stagg! 

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I have ordered the book, but I haven't received it yet.  He told me: "The book is 250 pages long with over 100 diagrams and is split roughly 50/50  making/repairing."

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Received my book too! :)

 

I haven't read through the entire book yet but spent some time focused on certain chapters.

 

I  am impressed.  The drawings are excellent.  Everything is clearly explained. 

 

Addresses a lot questions I had and some I didn't know I had! ^_^

 

Glad I went ahead and ordered it.  John is a lovely man too...talked with him on the phone...

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