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On 3/25/2021 at 3:23 PM, JacksonMaberry said:

I'm with Paul and Michael. Avoid the dangerous reagents and use the kinds of things that would have been available in the 16-17th centuries, like sunlight, vegetable tannins, oils, resins, and crude nitrogen-bearing solutions (horse sauce, for example)

Most definitely.  People are always looking for some secret recipe or magic ingredients that the great Italian makers used when all they did use were things readily available to them and even to furniture makers of the time.

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5 hours ago, ShadowStrad said:

Most definitely.  People are always looking for some secret recipe or magic ingredients that the great Italian makers used when all they did use were things readily available to them and even to furniture makers of the time.

 I agree it is unlikely they used materials NOT available to them. That doesn't shed much light on what they did use. It also doesn't account for the fact that modern tastes for older looking violins mean that making instruments which look like the old one's did when they were new makes them harder to sell.

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7 minutes ago, nathan slobodkin said:

 I agree it is unlikely they used materials NOT available to them. That doesn't shed much light on what they did use. It also doesn't account for the fact that modern tastes for older looking violins mean that making instruments which look like the old one's did when they were new makes them harder to sell.

This is an extremely important and valid point. I'm glad you raised it. 

It takes a kind of stubbornness verging on insanity to insist on making instruments the way you want to make them irrespective of market forces. There's a reason I'm impoverished.

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On 3/27/2021 at 8:58 PM, JacksonMaberry said:

This is an extremely important and valid point. I'm glad you raised it. 

It takes a kind of stubbornness verging on insanity to insist on making instruments the way you want to make them irrespective of market forces. There's a reason I'm impoverished.

I can't remember which violin making competition it was or which year...I just remember a maker who submitted a violin varnished yellow and won 3rd place.  

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  • 2 weeks later...

Dichromate is toxic and carcinogenic and should not be used without proper safety equipment. I would say it is save once it is on the wood, as it is mainly known to cause lung and nasal cancers. But damage to the skin is also a potential risk.

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18 minutes ago, uguntde said:

Dichromate is toxic and carcinogenic and should not be used without proper safety equipment. I would say it is save once it is on the wood, as it is mainly known to cause lung and nasal cancers. But damage to the skin is also a potential risk.

The toxicity exposure route is primarily through inhalation or ingestion (including incidental ingestion). Dermal contact can result in dermatitis. These risks are for the person making or applying the potassium dichromate. There are no adverse health risks associated with these applications to the end user (musician).  Just the facts, not advise on whether or not to use the chemicals. However, as said above, and which applies to many chemical uses, proper PPE for the chemical should always be used.

Cheers,

Jim

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On 4/7/2021 at 6:39 PM, Jim Bress said:

The toxicity exposure route is primarily through inhalation or ingestion (including incidental ingestion). Dermal contact can result in dermatitis. These risks are for the person making or applying the potassium dichromate. There are no adverse health risks associated with these applications to the end user (musician).  Just the facts, not advise on whether or not to use the chemicals. However, as said above, and which applies to many chemical uses, proper PPE for the chemical should always be used.

Cheers,

Jim

I agree, there is no risk for the player of a dichromate treated instrument. A maker who uses this should however know how to use this safely. CMR substances should not be used by non-experts, and this will include most violin makers.

 

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