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Any Reputable Ebay Violin Sellers???


tara81662l
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Does that mean that the excellent, well-trained, intelligent and conscientious professional luthier with 50 years of experience, who I use to repair and set up nearly all of the violins I sell on ebay,  "should plain die and stop wasting resources?" He might take personal offense to that suggestion, as would many mature (read old) people who choose to continue to work for a wide variety of reasons. If someone chooses a new career late in life, does that make them indecent?

 

Competition raises quality and lowers price.  Competition motivates young people to work hard to achieve a level of superior competency at whatever they do, in order to compete successfully. If the masters with the knowledge and skills gained by years of training and experience were to simply withdraw from the marketplace to create space for new blood, the quality would go down and the price would go up.  In a vacuum of competition, the mediocre thrive.

Like!!!  :)

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Does that mean that the excellent, well-trained, intelligent and conscientious professional luthier with 50 years of experience, who I use to repair and set up nearly all of the violins I sell on ebay,  "should plain die and stop wasting resources?" He might take personal offense to that suggestion, as would many mature (read old) people who choose to continue to work for a wide variety of reasons. If someone chooses a new career late in life, does that make them indecent?

 

Competition raises quality and lowers price.  Competition motivates young people to work hard to achieve a level of superior competency at whatever they do, in order to compete successfully. If the masters with the knowledge and skills gained by years of training and experience were to simply withdraw from the marketplace to create space for new blood, the quality would go down and the price would go up.  In a vacuum of competition, the mediocre thrive.

 

Thank you for quoting me completely out of context. I was having second thoughts.....

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Does that mean that the excellent, well-trained, intelligent and conscientious professional luthier with 50 years of experience, who I use to repair and set up nearly all of the violins I sell on ebay,  "should plain die and stop wasting resources?" He might take personal offense to that suggestion, as would many mature (read old) people who choose to continue to work for a wide variety of reasons. If someone chooses a new career late in life, does that make them indecent?

 

Competition raises quality and lowers price.  Competition motivates young people to work hard to achieve a level of superior competency at whatever they do, in order to compete successfully. If the masters with the knowledge and skills gained by years of training and experience were to simply withdraw from the marketplace to create space for new blood, the quality would go down and the price would go up.  In a vacuum of competition, the mediocre thrive.

 

 

Like!!!  :)

 

Now, you're wasting good keyboard : we KNEW THAT ! Give us some credit.

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2. Well Sieg flipping heil!

 “Heil” would require a capital “H”, if you don't mind

Does that mean that the excellent, well-trained, intelligent and conscientious professional luthier with 50 years of experience, who I use to repair and set up nearly all of the violins I sell on ebay,  "should plain die and stop wasting resources?"

I hardly think “well-trained, intelligent and conscientious professional luthiers” were what Carl meant, rather snake-oil vendors and handymen

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I still get a sense we are talking at cross-purposes.

 

People with more money will be more willing to look for 'high end' establishments for retail and repair.

 

People with little money, or those exploring a concept are more likely to look to "bargain venues".

 

I have read repeatedly on MN...that experienced luthiers don't want to 'waste their time' fixing cheap violins.

 

Perhaps a young luthier...just having come from 4 years of school and however many years of apprenticeship (or whatever it is called) doesn't want to deal with cheap violins either.  They might feel that their education entitles them to work on the better quality instruments with the monied clientele.

 

But if owners WANT their cheap violins fixed cheaply...where are they supposed to go?

 

I think as long as no one bills themselves as more than they are (yes, I know)...isn't there room for everyone?

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1.  Because my customers (all local) know where to find me and know that I do good work and stand behind it.  I strenuously object to the loaded words "wannabe" and "tinkering".

 

2. You could lose that "negative bet" in a hurry.  You know darned well that there are a number of retiree makers of no little skill posting on MN.

 

3.  "Cheap repairs for the cheap 'uns" are incredibly challenging, but the lack of serious pressure makes them fun.

 

Carl, what I find objectionable is that the wording and tone of your posts on this matter not only seem to be dismissing 2nd. career doing-what-they-love older folks as a bunch of clueless senile goofballs vandalizing fiddles but also appear to be attempting to group the lot of us with people like those horrid "violin repair" purveyors notably represented on YouTube sanding old violins down to the quick, repairing cracks with paper patches and white glue, then spray varnishing their victims and noting how pretty they look (most of those advertisers also seem to own brick-and-mortar music shops).   :P

Righteous.

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Does that mean that the excellent, well-trained, intelligent and conscientious professional luthier with 50 years of experience, who I use to repair and set up nearly all of the violins I sell on ebay,  "should plain die and stop wasting resources?" He might take personal offense to that suggestion, as would many mature (read old) people who choose to continue to work for a wide variety of reasons. If someone chooses a new career late in life, does that make them indecent?

 

Competition raises quality and lowers price.  Competition motivates young people to work hard to achieve a level of superior competency at whatever they do, in order to compete successfully. If the masters with the knowledge and skills gained by years of training and experience were to simply withdraw from the marketplace to create space for new blood, the quality would go down and the price would go up.  In a vacuum of competition, the mediocre thrive.

I'm with VdA on this one.  And you write well - to address a previous comment - even if it is a tad over the top.

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Greetings All,

 

Please don't let my absence of posts be construed as a lack of interest or follow up. I continue to follow and read your pearls of wisdom several times a day. I never thought a single question about Ebay sellers would generate such a fascinating discussion!

 

I even post messages myself that are timely in the moment that may address a question asked to me or serve as a response to something I read. However, I keep forgetting that I am still in rookie status and my posts have to be read and approved for the board. So there is often a 2 to 4 day delay until you see them.

 

I may be a bit tardy at times, but I am not that SLOW. Hopefully soon I will be able to respond in real time!    :-)

 

Tara

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Righteous.

 

 

I'm with VdA on this one.  

 

Was it you writing this a while ago :

 

http://www.maestronet.com/forum/index.php?/topic/331246-ben-conover-prompted-this/#entry646940

 

 

""""I was a molecular biologist for a good while, worked for a very famous Nobel laureate for a year (probably the smartest person I ever met), then decided to head back to grad school;

Drifted into IT and networking, concomitantly began writing for some IT pubs

Progressed to cybersecurity - very active with local security groups (OWASP,ISSA, ISACA), and have numerous certifications

Couldn't stay away from biology, so rose through ranks and became a Scuba instructor

Volunteer for USCG Auxiliary

Occasionally sail (taught on small boats for a while as a youth), used to windsurf

Played violin through college, recently rediscovered it under the bed (two years or so ago)

Trying to figure out how to afford a dinky Burgess :-) or a Philips violin; my first violin buying experience didn't end so well, which was what brought me to the Maestronet site, and still waiting to make my first violin.  In college, made an Appalachian dulcimer and a bowed psaltery, when I should have been in lab.

 

"""

 

I think that basically removes any doubt if there was ever one, that you lack reasonable experience in those matters your are "with VdA on this one".  :lol:

Or to put it differently , you are trying to be supportive but know not what you are talking about. 

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Was it you writing this a while ago :

 

http://www.maestronet.com/forum/index.php?/topic/331246-ben-conover-prompted-this/#entry646940

 

 

""""I was a molecular biologist for a good while, worked for a very famous Nobel laureate for a year (probably the smartest person I ever met), then decided to head back to grad school;

Drifted into IT and networking, concomitantly began writing for some IT pubs

 

 

"""

 

I think that basically removes any doubt if there was ever one, that you lack reasonable experience in those matters your are "with VdA on this one".  :lol:

Or to put it differently , you are trying to be supportive but know not what you are talking about. 

Some observations:

1) You have entirely too much time on your hands, but apparently, grammar and proof reading isn't one of your strengths... (you/you're/your) :P

2) I have since gained a reasonable education on violin qualities, and the purchase process. I have also started to make a violin (do you have any pictures of anything you have built?) under the direction of the most active (former?) MN member. I am willing to bet in the last two years I have visited more violin shops and tried more violins than you.

3) Your ad hominem attacks only serve to discredit any advice you might give or have given, and have alienated more than a few.

 

4) My answer to the OP would be (that's what this list is about, isn't it?) to read Smiley Hsu's account of violin purchase over at violinist.com. At her price range, I understand why she might think she could get better value away from a first line dealer.  In LA, the mark up can be surprising.  Purchasing a second hand violin worked on by - let's use the term - semi-professionals - may get her more bang for the buck than anything else.  You discredit many who have done good repair work.  Her question though, was about using eBay.

 

I would not recommend that, unless she used reliable on-line dealers (like paddah-hound, there are a few more); and there are bad ones: there is one who writes his own certificates (Gartsman?) who overprices anything such that all of the LA dealers would blush.

 

Great apparisers miss the mark sometimes in person; because there is so much ^^&*( on eBay, and the only examination you get are photographs (sound clips off the 'net aren't comparable and don't count), it is unlikely an amateur would ever spot something reasonable (nor would many professionals), which is why in general, buying from eBay is not recommended, as has been discussed here ad nauseum.

 

IMHO, the OP should examine violins in her range at as many stores as possible.  When she then sees something from a part time repairer, she would be in a better position to judge tone, workmanship, and extent of repairs.  She may choose to do busines with a shop, or some other vehicle, but at that point would have much better judgement nad a better outcome.

 

We all would like to be directed to the "magic" shop or site for a great deal on a violin that sounds good and appreciates, guaranteed, but that is the land of Puff.

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Some observations:

1) You have entirely too much time on your hands, but apparently, grammar and proof reading isn't one of your strengths... (you/you're/your) :P

2)

 

2a)I have since gained a reasonable education on violin qualities, and the purchase process. I have also started to make a violin (do you have any pictures of anything you have built?) under the direction of the most active (former?) MN member.

2b)I am willing to bet in the last two years I have visited more violin shops and tried more violins than you.

 

3) Your ad hominem attacks only serve to discredit any advice you might give or have given, and have alienated more than a few.

 

4)

 

4a) My answer to the OP would be (that's what this list is about, isn't it?) to read Smiley Hsu's account of violin purchase over at violinist.com. At her price range, I understand why she might think she could get better value away from a first line dealer.  In LA, the mark up can be surprising.  Purchasing a second hand violin worked on by - let's use the term - semi-professionals - may get her more bang for the buck than anything else. 

 

4b) You discredit many who have done good repair work.  Her question though, was about using eBay.

 

4c) I would not recommend that, unless she used reliable on-line dealers (like paddah-hound, there are a few more); and there are bad ones: there is one who writes his own certificates (Gartsman?) who overprices anything such that all of the LA dealers would blush.

 

Great apparisers miss the mark sometimes in person; because there is so much ^^&*( on eBay, and the only examination you get are photographs (sound clips off the 'net aren't comparable and don't count), it is unlikely an amateur would ever spot something reasonable (nor would many professionals), which is why in general, buying from eBay is not recommended, as has been discussed here ad nauseum.

 

IMHO, the OP should examine violins in her range at as many stores as possible.  When she then sees something from a part time repairer, she would be in a better position to judge tone, workmanship, and extent of repairs.  She may choose to do busines with a shop, or some other vehicle, but at that point would have much better judgement nad a better outcome.

 

We all would like to be directed to the "magic" shop or site for a great deal on a violin that sounds good and appreciates, guaranteed, but that is the land of Puff.

 

1. You are right there. I do have too much time on my hands ( retired ) and English grammar is not my strength - 4th language. But you rush to conclusions through exceptions, which is not clever. I read my posts over the entire thread and found only one mistake of the sort you object to. I usually write "you're" when I mean you are but when I type on my tablet, the software keeps trying to guess what I want. Sometimes gets it wrong and sometimes I am plain lazy and skip rectifying. My bad.  The "  :P " means " I am smart and you are stupid" - it's a very bad idea on MN and so is noticing and commenting on other people's grammar. Many members are not native English speakers and quite a few American ones seem to have some difficulty, too. In general, correcting people's grammar on the Web registers one as an asshole. In my case, I enjoy being set straight - please carry on. That's how I learn.

 

2a)  Am glad to read that and wish you the best. I do not make or play violins - I leave that for people with talent for it. I have none. Accordingly, I have no pictures of anything I've built. The reason I am not asking you for any sound clips of anything you've played should be pretty obvious.

 

Of course, your " I have since gained a reasonable education on violin qualities, and the purchase process" is something I have no proof of whatsoever. On MN most of the proof comes from the pudding of posts over some length of time. I'll leave it at that for the moment. By the way, can you spot a problem  in the sentence I just quoted ? Or "grammar and proof reading isn't one of your strengths" ?

 

2b) There's no need to bet - you have that won by a long shot. In the past two years I visited no violin shop and haven't tried any violin. 

 

4a) Sure.

 

4b) Not at all. Did no such thing. My comments were directed at a particular category and things took a turn when Violadamore decided to jump in defense of everybody. In order to know that, you would've had to actually read the thread with some degree of attention. I don't think you did. You may notice in time that this is a rather thorny problem on MN and one of the reasons quite a few people stopped posting - in general the ones who had something to say. 

 

4c) Sounds like good advice to me. What exactly was your problem then ??

 

Apologies for any grammatical errors - given my degree of retardation, not much can be expected. And a piece of free, i.e. useless advice : never exemplify with an exception. It's one of the marks of defective thinking and some pay attention to that. 

 

Now, post something lengthy where it is made clear how clever you are and how stupid I am. I shall reply momentarily, thereby providing further entertainment for our distinguished members and the public at large.

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1. You are right there. I do have too much time on my hands ( retired ) and English grammar is not my strength - 4th language. But you rush to conclusions through exceptions, which is not clever. I read my posts over the entire thread and found only one mistake of the sort you object to. I usually write "you're" when I mean you are but when I type on my tablet, the software keeps trying to guess what I want. Sometimes gets it wrong and sometimes I am plain lazy and skip rectifying. My bad.  The "  :P " means " I am smart and you are stupid" - it's a very bad idea on MN and so is noticing and commenting on other people's grammar. Many members are not native English speakers and quite a few American ones seem to have some difficulty, too. In general, correcting people's grammar on the Web registers one as an asshole. In my case, I enjoy being set straight - please carry on. That's how I learn.

Don't apologise for your (you're) English grammar Carl. In fact your English grammar is so good, that for a long time, I thought you must be at least an American :)

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