Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Cremonese Guadagnini Edgework


Roger Hargrave
 Share

Recommended Posts

With the help of Chris Ruffo I have finally managed to edit the blog about Cremonese and Guadagini edgework. I really did not want to do this after the bass blog, but Chris did so much work and  I just could not say no. However it was a bigger job than I thought. Anyway now it’s finally up and running on my web site. If anyone sees any mistakes please feel free to let me know.

I would like to thank everyone for their support when I was doing the blog, especially Chris. BUT, does anyone know where Chris is? I have not heard from him in a while and when I type his name into the MN search nothing comes up. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, time to open my mouth as usual;

I've looked (breifly, I must admit) through this article by Roger and Chris, and I am thinking that this is truly a marvelous thing - with exactly the right amount or combination of actual depictions of the making process, shown by photographs, along with just the right amount of theoretical, written information also.

Truly, a thing of beauty, and I, for one, say thanks guys - for illustrating something difficult - in such a manor as to make it easy and accessible by everyone perusing...

Like most of Rogers articles, this is a trove (truly) of very precise information, useful to makers with a drive to re-create the minutia involved with accurately made "Old Italian" instrument copies.

The eye for detail is evident in this article, as always, but what I find interesting and GREAT... is the photographic detail included this time. This time, ahh, this time, it is in such a language as I will be able to follow along without becoming lost in the theory, as I often am, or, as I often become - lost in the words - since I am a worker that thinks and works in a greatly pictorial sense.

Pictures tell me more than words ever will, and all of the pictures are there. As well as the words.

My thanks as usual.

Truly a great work.

Our field (violin making) is comprised of, basically, words, pictures and woodworking... words and pictures that describe and recreate things that are, truly, slightly closed & walled off, things that are elusive and delicate - things that take, lets say, a lifetime of study and practice to completely understand and recreate.

Why would I say something like this?

Because as far as I can see, (which isn't that far) it is the truth.

A lifetime to understand it all? Well go ahead and study the available material and try your best to re-create what has been done by the masters of the past.

and such work as this? it is bound to become the theoretical cornerstone for makers in the future.

So, considering that aspect of such a work as this...

Well, it is truly very cool that we, us people making violins today, all are around and able to communicate with these authors as contemporaries of ours.

Please let us know what has happened to Chris and if he's OK.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

DarlG just pointed out a mistake and I read this stuff through so many times. It is always a wonder to me how these things get missed. Duane won't mind that I got hios name wrong, but the 'inside mould', that should read 'outside mould' on page 3, really is a howler. It might take a while my computer guy is on holiday and he is the only one with the passwords. He dosn't trust me. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

BUT, does anyone know where Chris is? I have not heard from him in a while and when I type his name into the MN search nothing comes up. 

 

I'm here! Just been lurking lately! I'll PM you.

 

I felt compelled to pull this stuff together from Roger's various posts with the intent of creating easy-to-follow 'study guides' around his techniques that would benefit professionals and amateurs alike.

 

Kind of my way of giving back to the community here from all the stuff i've learned from you the past few years

 

There is a second article in the works on fitting a bass bar...

 

Chris (The Urban Luthier)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

DarlG just pointed out a mistake and I read this stuff through so many times. It is always a wonder to me how these things get missed. Duane won't mind that I got hios name wrong, but the 'inside mould', that should read 'outside mould' on page 3, really is a howler. It might take a while my computer guy is on holiday and he is the only one with the passwords. He dosn't trust me. 

 

LOL I read this at least 20 times and each time my brain registered 'outside mould'. Too funny.

 

As for Duane's name, the error is in one place in the text, his name is correct in the footnotes. Sorry for missing this one also!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reading thru this article again I have a couple questions for Roger if he doesn't mind:

 

How did you decide what the arching height should be? You mentioned in the article that you made the arching "without either measuring the height, or using arching templates..." 

 

How did you decide how deep to cut the narrow U-shaped channel? And is the depth the same in the c-bouts as the upper and lower bouts?

 

Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reading thru this article again I have a couple questions for Roger if he doesn't mind:

 

How did you decide what the arching height should be? You mentioned in the article that you made the arching "without either measuring the height, or using arching templates..." 

 

How did you decide how deep to cut the narrow U-shaped channel? And is the depth the same in the c-bouts as the upper and lower bouts?

 

Thanks!

 

 

Well the answer to these questions more is or less what I said in the blog. The fact that I could make a passable arching in this way is largely down to experience. I am almost 68 years old and I have been making and studying the violin family for almost half a century. In particular I have been studying and copying Cremonese methods. I strongly believe that following their methods and using copies of their tools, moulds and templates, creates that illusive Cremonese appearance that most people (players and makers) seem to crave. In my head I have an image of what I believe a Guadagnini arching looks like. I have seen quite a few and as the Strad posters that I made indicate, I have measured and drawn up quite a few.

 

In various places some of these methods linger on. As Ben notes my friend Francis Kuttner purfles with the box closed. I am doing this right now on a baroque violin. All that I can say is that you must try to let the working method dictate the arching shape. This in turn will set the height. Although I feel sure that some form of guide was used by the great Italian makers no two Cremonese aching are ever the same. Even from the same maker in the same year they vary. They are often recognisable, because they have certain common traits, but they are never identical.

 

One final piece of advice, (also mentioned in the blog) is to use each tool to its limit. Only move from bigger tools to smaller tools when it is necessary to clean off the marks left by the larger tool. In addition start working towards the final arching shape with the first gouge stroke. NEVER leave square platforms and or bumps. Thumb planes are NOT for shaping the aching. Thumb planes are simply for cleaning off the gouge marks, just as scrapers are used for cleaning off the thumb plane marks. Each tool has its purpose. You would not use a fret saw to cut down or convert a tree or a thumb plane to join the back and belly plates of a cello, (unless there was nothing else available). Remember the rule; always use the largest tool that fits the job at hand. Anything else is just wasted effort.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...