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How do you like your 'sheet' music?

How do you like your sheet music?  

16 members have voted

  1. 1. My sheet music preference is:

    • iPad
      0
    • Printed music from a publisher
    • Printed music - photocopy
      0
    • Other


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What is your sheet music preferences? I'll try a poll too...

I must be totally old school. I prefer sturdy off-white paper with dark black ink...spaced enough so the notes don't run together in one black blob... :rolleyes:

Hence, I prefer music printed by a printing house. If I'm actually going to work on something for any length of time I will buy a copy of the music.

However, I do photocopy quartet music - mostly to ensure the original score stays intact...and that it is available should members leave and new members join - and not return the music.

I do use free music (IMSLP is a great site) to look through material, but I find those photocopies especially frustrating since the scans are often not quite right to begin with...and visual quality is lost.

I can't for the life of me read from a computer screen (such as an iPad)... <_<

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Printed is my preference, but cheap is my usual reality.   :lol:

 

The vast quantity of material at IMSLP and Hymnary.org means that I play off a lot of laser printed pages of scans.

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I write most of my stuff up in ABC Notation, and then print it out.  Writing it out in code is like the old writing it out by hand--it helps with memorization, and you can edit if you wish.

 

The printouts look much more professional than photocopies/scans and the scribbled-on pages that I see most people hand around.  Plus, a lot of transcribing work has already been done by others.

 

ABCNotation.com

 

Here's a nice Baroque tune I transcribed from IMSPL: McGibbon's Scots Tunes, edited by Robert Bremner.

post-35343-0-99571200-1438973521_thumb.jpg

Mucking of Geordy's byer.pdf

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It's funny, I use my ipad for almost everything, including as a tuner (does Pythagorean), but I don't like reading music off of it.  I like white pieces of paper much better than blue light.  Plus I don't care if my sheet music falls on the floor.  :blink:

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The computer is fine for for reading short bits (of anything)...but I can 't "get into" or focus on material on a screen.

I am preparing new (to me) lectures for next semester...using existing material on the computer...and it is driving me bonkers that I can't flip through pages...

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Copying the quartet music,in my case, isn't illegal. I own the original. If we ever performed in public. ..and/or were paid for our performance - we would be covered.

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"Fair use" covers some photocopies, I think, but copying an entire work that's in copyright isn't fair use. I don't know how it is now, but music photocopies weren't legal in the UK, as far as I remember. And of course, public domain works are OK, but complete copies of recent printings and editions may not be. Scans or photocopies of original 18th/19th century editions should be legal worldwide... But you never know. :rolleyes:

Addie = not a lawyer.

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I like to have my music in MuseScore. Makes it trivial to transpose the key or arrange it for violin if it is for a different instrument and playback. I've been able to take popular folk tunes and expand them into longer pieces using elementary  compositional techniques. The printed pieces look like professionally published music.

 

For playing, I prefer black ink on bright white paper in oversized type so I do not need reading glasses to play. Again, a music editing program, like MuseScore, makes it easy to print oversized type.

 

I am careful to check for an active copyright on music and purchase it if I have any notion to play it, even though it is only for my own personal amusement. I do not care about the legal ramifications of not doing so. There is a moral obligation to pay someone who is offering their work for a fee. If you cannot afford the few bucks, then there is always IMSLP and hundreds of years worth of free music to choose from.

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I must be totally old school. I prefer sturdy off-white paper with dark black ink...spaced enough so the notes don't run together in one black blob... :rolleyes:

Hence, I prefer music printed by a printing house.

So do I.

 

Perhaps some of us are more or less sensitive to this.  Personally, I am VERY sensitive to the quality of paper and to the style of the print. It's probably "just psychological" but it seems I play better when reading music off good paper which has a more substantial, fuller type-style.

 

I have thought it would be an interesting experiment to put different sizes and qualities of print in front of players to see if they are effected.  I mean, for example:  would a player produce a fuller, richer tone if he had sheet music of fuller, richer quality of paper and type.  I have imagined printing really large, or plump-looking notes on a page to get a student to have a sense that those notes are more important and effect how he feels about them.

 

I just don't feel as good reading music off xeroxed, cheap, crinkled pages.  (But then don't forget that some of us are princesses who know whether we've spent the night with a darned pea under our mattress. :)

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If it isn't physically copied (paper), is it still a violation of copyright law? Are all of the image files and sound files that we upload onto the web subject to copyright laws? 

 

Just for fun, here is William Hogarth's "The Enraged Musician." Hogarth is one of the fathers of copyright law ("Hogarth's Act," 1734) in response to the piracy of his engravings.

 

the-enraged-musician-1741-etching-engrav

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Will...I just knew you were a princess!  :wub:

LOL

 

You should see my drawer full of tiaras.  My silver-polish bills are putting me in the poor house.  <_<

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Sound and image files are subject to copyright, but the internet is so big it has become unmanageable. Two numbers that apply are Life Plus 70, and 1923. Anything after the former, or before the latter is likely out of copyright.

The Hogarth print looks like a 19th c. Copy, BTW. :)

Something to keep in mind: an image or piece of music may be out of copyright, but if it's in a recent book, the book can be in copyright, and photos that people take of old works of art can also be copyrighted.

One corporation known for relentlessly protecting its own is Disney. I didn't know about the Hogarth Act. Thanks for that. :)

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LOL

 

You should see my drawer full of tiaras.  My silver-polish bills are putting me in the poor house.  <_<

I thought they were platinum. Soooo disappointed! :lol:

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If it isn't physically copied (paper), is it still a violation of copyright law? Are all of the image files and sound files that we upload onto the web subject to copyright laws?

Emphatically yes.

 

Here's more on the Hogarth: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Enraged_Musician

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I thought they were platinum. Soooo disappointed! :lol:

Those were melted down and sold long ago to support my violin making habit.  I need a 12 step program.   :)

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I believe that there are good reasons to support music publishers and pay for their products...  many of them provide excellent editing (I mean correct notes and other markings) based on good research;  this costs them money and I'm happy to pay for it.  The format of printed music is generally larger than A4 or US Letter which allows the music to be more legible (Imslp downloads tend to be reduced in size, I find them harder to read).  The paper is generally of better quality than what I keep in my printer/copier.  I like professionally produced editions, they are still a good buy (in my ever-humble opinion).   If they go away I think we'll be poorer for it.  

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Prefer the oversized off white printed sheet music, but like the convenience of downloadable files that I can store electronically and print out.  Wish they would create then to print out on oversized paper, but it is so nonstandard we would need special printers and paper - or they could format it to print ut on 11x17 which can be trimmed to size - that is what I do when I copy published music, copy it full size onto 11 x17 extra heavy off white paper at Fed Ex office and trim to size.  You can also enlarge the 8.5 x 11 music onto offwhite paper onto 11 x 17 and trim to size, it's not really that hard. 

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