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I have been questioning the wire issue myself. The sultana's tailpiece looks to be original.(Conor would know more)  If it is then that would be the ultimate test of strength. Given that the sultana originally had 10 double course steel strings. On the other hand if it did break that would be one hell of a zinger.

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The tailpiece is original, and I think the wire too. These don't often break, or at least I don't think I've seen one break. Even if one did, I'd say the tailpiece would just move enough to let off the string tension, like a normal gut. I've never seen a tailpiece that flew through the air, and decapitated the conductor!

Funny, in my insurance, I pay a chunk for product liability, despite suggesting that my violins are reasonably safe to be around. Maybe insurance companies are reading the pegbox, and assessing the risks from there.

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19 hours ago, Conor Russell said:

The tailpiece is original, and I think the wire too. These don't often break, or at least I don't think I've seen one break. Even if one did, I'd say the tailpiece would just move enough to let off the string tension, like a normal gut. I've never seen a tailpiece that flew through the air, and decapitated the conductor!

Funny, in my insurance, I pay a chunk for product liability, despite suggesting that my violins are reasonably safe to be around. Maybe insurance companies are reading the pegbox, and assessing the risks from there.

 I'm very sorry if I should be responsable for your insurance policy.:huh:

In fact, if the soldering is done well, a functional alloy is used for the wire and nothing messed around with it, it's probably more safe than the usual animal gut. I thought I read about the injury danger in the Hopfner Geissenhof book, but it must have been in some online essay.

The danger of breakage might rise when the wire is bent, by accident or deliberately, or by extraordinary oxydation. OTOH, there are so much hearsay stories out there about violinists getting badly injured by breaking A or E strings and other accidents, but I never met somebody being injured in person.

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4 hours ago, MeyerFittings said:

What is the deal with the ivory "bridge pins" ? Not something you see every day on old tails. Is the underside cracked or just the ivory. Repair?

These pins are to be found on Perry's English guitars too. They take a loop of the metal string. I wonder was this Sultana originally a six string because of these. I know of another made with six strings, but more with ten. 

The tailpiece facing has been cracked for years, but I saw no reason to repair it, other than to make a few missing pins, as it was holding together well.

I'm a bit disturbed about the wire gut! It doesn't seem to be seated in the button properly! 

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2 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

He wants an old Viennese one, not some American confect

Somebody else posted on the OP's Jacob, couple posts above.:)

 

9 hours ago, Renegade said:

I'm very sorry that I'm asking this question here (in another section - silence).
Would any of your colleagues have a baroque/neo-baroque/pseudo-baroque tailpiece for sale (of the type presented here)?

That looks nice...

5 hours ago, Mark Norfleet said:

 

IMG_5990.jpeg

 

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2 hours ago, Renegade said:

But more 'caramel' than 'candy' :)
Why do you call him 'American'?

What you want for your violins is a Vogtlandish type of tailpiece from the early to mid 19th century as I showed for a halfsize above, or visible at the cover of the first volume Zoebisch: https://migma-eg.de/publikationen/1515-vogtlaendischer-geigenbau-band-1-bis-1850-783895705946.html

The others are called confect because they are of course more some overdecorated fancy, with little regard to historical pieces. This is a sort of international misguide, so clearly many want to get rid of it, in opposite to real pieces. Therefore it might be a hard undertaking.

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4 hours ago, Blank face said:

What you want for your violins is a Vogtlandish type of tailpiece from the early to mid 19th century as I showed for a halfsize above, or visible at the cover of the first volume Zoebisch: https://migma-eg.de/publikationen/1515-vogtlaendischer-geigenbau-band-1-bis-1850-783895705946.html

The others are called confect because they are of course more some overdecorated fancy, with little regard to historical pieces. This is a sort of international misguide, so clearly many want to get rid of it, in opposite to real pieces. Therefore it might be a hard undertaking.

I have Salzkammergut and Vogtland from the first half of the 19th century - I need for them.
These two violins look a bit 'dead'... a tailpiece with these silver plates would be nice, it would liven them up a bit.

However, I also have a project for which this candy would be perfect. I know - viola Medici syndrome :)

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4 hours ago, Renegade said:

These two violins look a bit 'dead'... a tailpiece with these silver plates would be nice, it would liven them up a bit.

The Vogtlandish/Salzkammergut tailpiece plates would be brass, not silver, and from stained fruitwood, not ebony veneer as the Viennese.

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