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Just studying a recent thread from the fingerboard, I stumbled about this.

 

 

 

 

 

Wondered why I was only the 7th person who watched it after 3 weeks - could be of interest.

(And I hope, that Ben won't officially hate me now, too ;)  - I was deeply impressed, although I watched a few minutes only untill now).

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It is for one who knows very little about the violin in general and want to get their feet wet, The biscotti and wine crowd may find this interesting

I found it to be tedious and quit 30 minutes in...but who knows ....it may stimulate a new generation of makers, players, or collectors.

just my opinion

Jim

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I found it to have tantalizing ideas about geometric proportions and pythogrean/just musical intervals that are worth pursuing in a more rigorous scientific approach. But as important are play-ability issues. IOW, some geometric proportions are driven more by typical human anatomy rather than musical proportions.

 

Not all the analogies work. For example, the discussion about changes in the tennis racket and changes in the violin are not scientifically valid. (I've spent quite a few years working with tennis professionals to select strings and string tensions to match their game style and level of play based on research by various physics professors at universities like MIT.)

 

 Overall, very generous sharing of details both rigorous and anecdotal, to get one inside the violin.

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Maybe I was a bit overhasty to post it without considering all possibly comments..... :huh:

 

 

 Overall, very generous sharing of details both rigorous and anecdotal, to get one inside the violin.

 

That's just my impression - I find it always fascinating to listen to a lecture for people who are somehow clueless about a subject, but are specialists about another.

Maybe nothing new for insiders, and not every analogy valid (and I also didn't have the time to watch it all), but for this kind of presentation you need ideas, don't you?

I'm always appreciating things which are a bit "way-off" in this context.

And even if the sound quality isn't the best, some great instruments are presented.

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And even if the sound quality isn't the best, some great instruments are presented.

I thought the playing comparison of the 17thC fiddle and a modern one was very dramatic. They both sounded great but that modern one sounded like it was on steroids. I am not sure it was due primarily to the string tension, and it also contradicts the assertion that the violin has been basically unchanged since the 16th century.

 

Well worth viewing even if just for the historical bits. 

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