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violins88

The remains of the day

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Fortunately I do not have to make a living as a violin maker. I would love to, but I would surely starve. And, fortunately I have a sense of humor which protects me from feeling bad when I do stupid things. To wit:

 

I finished the f-holes on my Titian model. Very nice. Took my time. Enjoyed the journey.

 

Now it is time for the bassbar.  I carefully mark where the bar should go.  As I calculate, the center of the bar is 15.1 mm from the center of the instrument. Ok, just carefully cut and install wood braces to help chalk fit the bar. Next day I carefully plane a nice piece of spruce to a thickness of 5.5 mm. Took great care to have the growth lines be in correct alignment.  Beautiful job, John. This is going to be a terrific sounding violin.

 

Now carefully do the chalk fitting. Blue chalk. Was going to use plaster of paris, but oh, well.

 

If I do say so myself, I did a great job of fitting the bar. Michael Darnton might agree. Or not.

 

Now glue the bar, using my home made wood clamps. Neat concept clamps.

 

Ok, after 4 hours, I get anxious. I feel the glue. Not hard yet. Ok, I can wait.

 

Then I take a second look. Then I realize that the principle of chirality has been violated.  I definitely installed the bar on the correct side of the plate. But now it is reversed. The only way to explain that is that the universe has reversed itself. Right is now left and so on.

 

But I find that I am still right handed, so I could not play this violin. It would for left handers.

 

Still, fortunately, I have Maestronet to share my story with.

 

Ok, now fess up, somebody. Have you ever done something so bad?

 

John

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Ok, now fess up, somebody. Have you ever done something so bad?

 

No, never.  I intentionally cut off that button so that I could practice my button splicing repair work.  And I broke the top plate recently by jamming in that pitch pocket patch... but obviously there was a weak spot in the top that needed to be glued up anyway.

 

For the bass bar, I have a fixture that prevents universe reversal... 

post-25192-0-27272900-1433893226_thumb.jpgpost-25192-0-13922100-1433893228_thumb.jpg

 

It's a timesaver, too.

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I thought I was going to see a picture of missing digits caused by an errant chisel or knife.  whew.  We can blame it on the holding cradle.  I dd go out and check mine for misplaced bars.  I wasn't 100% sure after reading here.

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ɯıɾ

'sɹǝǝɥɔ

 

˙uo ʞɔıd oʇ sǝʞıן ǝsɹǝʌıun ǝɥʇ ǝuo ʎןuo ǝɥʇ ʇou ɯ,ı ʍouʞ ı ʍou ʇsɐǝן ʇɐ  ˙uɥoɾ ʎɹoʇs ʇɐǝɹƃ

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Fortunately I do not have to make a living as a violin maker. I would love to, but I would surely starve. And, fortunately I have a sense of humor which protects me from feeling bad when I do stupid things. To wit:

 

I finished the f-holes on my Titian model. Very nice. Took my time. Enjoyed the journey.

 

Now it is time for the bassbar.  I carefully mark where the bar should go.  As I calculate, the center of the bar is 15.1 mm from the center of the instrument. Ok, just carefully cut and install wood braces to help chalk fit the bar. Next day I carefully plane a nice piece of spruce to a thickness of 5.5 mm. Took great care to have the growth lines be in correct alignment.  Beautiful job, John. This is going to be a terrific sounding violin.

 

Now carefully do the chalk fitting. Blue chalk. Was going to use plaster of paris, but oh, well.

 

If I do say so myself, I did a great job of fitting the bar. Michael Darnton might agree. Or not.

 

Now glue the bar, using my home made wood clamps. Neat concept clamps.

 

Ok, after 4 hours, I get anxious. I feel the glue. Not hard yet. Ok, I can wait.

 

Then I take a second look. Then I realize that the principle of chirality has been violated.  I definitely installed the bar on the correct side of the plate. But now it is reversed. The only way to explain that is that the universe has reversed itself. Right is now left and so on.

 

But I find that I am still right handed, so I could not play this violin. It would for left handers.

 

Still, fortunately, I have Maestronet to share my story with.

 

Ok, now fess up, somebody. Have you ever done something so bad?

 

John

Of course not.  Most of mine have something vaguely resembling a bass bar in the right place as an indicator before I get them.........  :lol:   Now, of course, you have a valuable left-handed top so that you can surprise the next lefty who walks in with your clairvoyant foresight.  :ph34r:

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Of course you could always set it up right handed and when you make the next one with the bass bar on the traditionally correct side see if anyone, including you, could tell the difference in the sound that it produces.

 

David, care to weigh in?

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My mentor, or tormentor...Mike Scoggins, told me this story:

 

He was the teacher at the VMSA. A student, who shall remain anonymous (not me-long before my time there), asked if the bar fit well enough to glue in. Mike said that he answered yes. The student asked if he could glue the bar in, Mike said yes. Mike had a habit of answering the questions that you asked him, and I quickly learned that I had to think carefully about the question. The next day, the student came to Mike and asked what the next step was, and Mike said that he told him to remove the Bass Bar and place it on the correct side of the instrument. You are not the first.

 

I've: Sawn off a button, reamed the peg from the wrong direction (I AM left-handed), glued cleats in with the grain parallel to the top...once I looked in a violin that I was rushing to glue together and I had forgotten to carve the linings down-they were still rectangular!

 

The person who got me started with all of this, Harry Ramey of Berea, KY, once told me: "A man who never made a mistake never made a fiddle." I figure that it applies to womyn, too.

 

Look on the bright side. You won't do that one again!

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ɯıɾ
'sɹǝǝɥɔ
 
˙uo ʞɔıd oʇ sǝʞıן ǝsɹǝʌıun ǝɥʇ ǝuo ʎןuo ǝɥʇ ʇou ɯ,ı ʍouʞ ı ʍou ʇsɐǝן ʇɐ  ˙uɥoɾ ʎɹoʇs ʇɐǝɹƃ

 

OMG.  Don't tell me how you did that. I want to see if my son can figure it out.

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You know, Don, Lucifer himself breezes through these forums and takes notes.

 

Test results notwithstanding, orienting bass bar grain that way is just begging for a downward elevator ride one day...

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Ok, now fess up, somebody. Have you ever done something so bad?

 

John

I was in a class where someone did this.  That's to be expected every once in a while.  What was not so expected was that the instructor didn't catch it until it was too late.

 

This has been discussed before, and we all know why doctors mark the kidney they are supposed to take out.  There's nothing much more abstract than left and right when the patient is looking one way and the Doctor, the other.  Right?

 

But, full disclosure, I did cut off a button; I just never had a good reason until Don's post. Thanks, Don, some of us owe you, big time!  :)

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You know, Don, Lucifer himself breezes through these forums and takes notes.

 

Test results notwithstanding, orienting bass bar grain that way is just begging for a downward elevator ride one day...

I maintain a violin that has a bass bar, laminated down the center, with the grain orientation this way. I've been into the instrument twice over the years, and it used to disturb me not to replace it, but the instrument sounds wonderful, so it is left as it is.

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I sewed a pair of pants ...with two left legs ...once

 

On a violin??

Hey! Wish I had thought of that at the time! Could've used 'em for a violin bag.

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Test results notwithstanding, orienting bass bar grain that way is just begging for a downward elevator ride one day...

Somebody noticed.

 

I am probably doing more than half of my bass bars on the slab.  An elevator ride would be nice, but I expect to be kicked down the shaft without the elevator.

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I've had a few. I cut the button off my first back.

On my third or fourth bridge I was dismayed to discover I had some how tapered it incorrectly, the perpendicular side was nearer the finger board.

But what was bizarre was the next bridge. Knowing my mistake i took extra care. DSoo you can imagine my horror when it was wrong again! I really thought the universe was conspiring against me that day...

PS. A fellow student, no doubt excited about nearing the completion of his violin, put his label on the wrong side.

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Done that!, on a new cello about five years ago. Couldn't believe it.

 

But worse, I made a cello once about fifteen years ago. Carved the back, carved the top, put in soundholes and a bar, glue on the back, went to glue on the top and found it wouldn't fit. I had scribed both plates from the same face of the ribs! 

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I was in a class where someone did this.  That's to be expected every once in a while.  What was not so expected was that the instructor didn't catch it until it was too late.

 

This has been discussed before, and we all know why doctors mark the kidney they are supposed to take out.  There's nothing much more abstract than left and right when the patient is looking one way and the Doctor, the other.  Right?

 

But, full disclosure, I did cut off a button; I just never had a good reason until Don's post. Thanks, Don, some of us owe you, big time!  :)

Before my shoulder operation in April four different people asked me to verify which shoulder was being operated on.  The surgeon came by to verify one more time, and then signed my shoulder.  I wonder how many times a surgeon operated on the right body part, but the wrong patiant.

 

On my current (and first) fiddle I carefully carved the back long arch according to my template.  It wasn't until I finished that I realized I was using the top's long arch template.  :blink:     I only had enough wood to partially correct my blunder.

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Violin #1: Leaved 2mm from the outline on the top and back plates because i was afraid of damaging the border while working on the plates, later i totaly forgot about that and did the purfling like normal, after gluing the plates the violin had cello sized borders, decided to take them down to normal size and now the purfling is almost in the edge  :wacko: 

Violin #2: took me a few days to realize i had sawn off the button

Thinking about a mistakes checklist, so maybe the #3 will have normal purling AND a button

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