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FredN

Tools

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I was making a top for a cello, happened to look at all the tools laying there, and remembered when all I had were some carpenter's hand tools . I guess you eventually reach an age when only a pantograph  would be visible . Wish I had one.

post-24779-0-02464900-1431809158_thumb.jpg

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Beyond a certain age everything is excused.

 

I am amazed at your work and knowledge.

 

A pantograph is for weaklings - feeble in mind and body.

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I was making a top for a cello, happened to look at all the tools laying there, and remembered when all I had were some carpenter's hand tools . I guess you eventually reach an age when only a pantograph  would be visible . Wish I had one.

Not even a pantograph needs to be visible. One can buy pre-carved parts, or finished violins made somewhat to specs, if that is what one is into.

 

I don't know how old you are, or what infirmities you may need to deal with, but there have been plenty of makers who were still kickin' ass with hand tools into their 70's and beyond.

About all I know about you is that you come across on this forum as a pretty smart guy.

 

I've got some permanent nerve damage in the left hand and arm, and this required some new learning. Initially, I was a little down about it, but then I started to look at things like how well Django Reinhardt managed to play the guitar with two fingers.

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Thank you Janito for your kind remarks. I just wasn't thinking it takes energy to use any of them when I started, which I don't have.

 

Hi David. Yeah, it's all age and infirmities. I'm near 89,  beaten up from sports, regretfully. Even though I made my first inst in my  sixties when I retired, I still had lots of energy, and forgot what time does to you.

 

Jose, I think what you are seeing is a Woodcraft horizontal sharpening stone. It is really great, unfortunately uneven wetting of the stone creates a strong wobble that must have stopped production due to many returns. All one had to do is move some bolts around in the middle and balance it. It is  easy to sharpen anything from finger planes, gouges, chisels, etc. I do have a router suspended  that I can micro adjust for cutting the groove for purfling and other jobs that require tight hands. I think it would be worth showing on Mn for anyone that has hand problems.

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Hi David. Yeah, it's all age and infirmities. I'm near 89,  beaten up from sports, regretfully. Even though I made my first inst in my  sixties when I retired, I still had lots of energy, and forgot what time does to you.

 

89 years old, and beaten up from sports? OK, I was way out of line by talking about what some people can still do in their 70s. Hat's off to you for still trying.

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Jose, so that is called a router plane. I didn't know that, thanks. It was my father's and he used it to mortise the stair risers for inserting the steps when making stairs. I find it useful  for roughing down the outside. I think if you watched me work you'll stick with Juliet!

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Jose, so that is called a router plane. I didn't know that, thanks. It was my father's and he used it to mortise the stair risers for inserting the steps when making stairs. I find it useful  for roughing down the outside. I think if you watched me work you'll stick with Juliet!

I'm really startin' to love you, Fred.

Yes, we've had some major disagreements in the past, but thanks for sharing more about yourself (and also your sense of humor), so I can have a better sense of where you're coming from.

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Jose, so that is called a router plane. I didn't know that, thanks. It was my father's and he used it to mortise the stair risers for inserting the steps when making stairs. I find it useful  for roughing down the outside. I think if you watched me work you'll stick with Juliet!

Stradivari had one too... with a wooden base though.

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I've got some permanent nerve damage in the left hand and arm, and this required some new learning. Initially, I was a little down about it, but then I started to look at things like how well Django Reinhardt managed to play the guitar with two fingers.

Wow, Can we call you Django??  That's about the coolest nickname imaginable!

 

:-)

DLB

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Hi David, I'd rather have the old spats, love spats aren't much fun!  Appreciate all your comments, always to the point.

 

Rue, I only made violas (around 20), one cello but i'll be happy to post something when I'm over the laborious part with this top.

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This is slightly off topic, but it has to do with tools.  In part of my work photos by William Carrick, and Edinburgh Scot who worked in St Petersburg in the late 19th Cent.,  became a topic of interest.  Carrick is famous for his portraits of "ordinary" Russians.  This tool seller attracted my attention:

 

http://www.museumsyndicate.com/item.php?item=33860

 

BTW - My father-in-law, 83, and a long retired joiner from Malta (trained in the dockyard just after WW2) says that router planes were known as "old woman's tooth."

 

Regards,

 

Tim

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