Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

inside mould v's outside mould


pjham
 Share

Recommended Posts

 

The making of the Stentor® Violin

 

In the above youtube video the cheaper instruments are made using outside mould and for the more expensive instruments an inside mould.

Just wondering what the reason for this is.

Is a violin made using an inside mould likely to be "better" than one using an outside mould if other factors are equal?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It looks like the outside mold allows skipping some operations and saving time... linings are put in as one piece, going over the corner blocks instead of being inset; corner details aren't shown, but I suspect the ribs are just pinched together and trimmed later, instead of the sequence of trimming the C-bout rib to glue on the bout ribs.  Basically the outside mold can save steps while deviating slightly from the traditional construction details.

 

I too enjoyed seeing workers moving at warp speed with no machinery whatsoever and minimal tooling.  The stacks of wood at the beginning are also impressive.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agreed.  But seriously, how many makers on MN can bend a C-bout rib in 10 seconds?

 

10 seconds?

Psssh!

Yeah, if I stop for a cup of coffee or two perhaps...

 

Ok, ok... I must admit that those guys are incredibly fast at their jobs.

That's the advantage of having cut and bent 20,000 C bouts, in the last week, I would suppose.

Thanks for posting that pjham - I love watching everything violin making related, and that was very interesting -

I watched the whole thing through.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That video completely kills all fantasies of violin making being an art   :(

Well, yes and no.  Look at the results they are getting.  The violins look like factory violins.  However, I admire those workers greatly and can learn from them. 

 

Probably our image of Antonio sitting frozen for all time examining one of his instruments is way out of line with reality.  No reason to think they worked slowly in the Strad shop.  I bet they were pouring it on all the time, but were incredibly skillful.

 

It's interesting to compare the sparse nature of the factory with some pictures of the early bow making shops in Mirecourt.  Some can be found by googling "Images of Mirecourt violin factories."

 

Regarding the rib bending, it looks like the ribs are very thick.  (at about 4:39)  The narrator says they are "dampened" but maybe they are wetter than most of us work.  I don't see how ribs that thick could be bent that fast and easily unless there are other factors in play;  greener wood, or less flame might help.  But then I haven't bent 20 thousand.  Any opinions?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I always thought of outside moulds being a French thing?  Does anyone teach or use an outside mould these days for artistic violin making (as opposed to production)

 

I thought Stentor was a trademark of JBV's brother I did not know it was english.  I must have it mixed up with something else.

 

 

DLB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I always thought of outside moulds being a french thing?  Does anyone teach or use an outside mould these days for artistic violin making (as opposed to production)

 

I know of a few contemporary makers that use an outside mold. I've tried it myself and felt that it had some pros and cons.

 

Pros: Accuracy

Cons: Accuracy and that it's a bit more fussy to do well

 

I think it's best used in a factory setting were the plates are made separate from the ribs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Outside molds allow for division of labor, where one group can do plates, one can do blocks, one can do ribs, and they will all be interchangeable. Every top will match every back, and these will fit the rib garland in the outside mold. Blocks and linings can be fitted in the mold, edges leveled, and garland braced to hold its shape (or not) before being removed from the mold. Then the corpus can be clamped together and glued in one operation. 

 

The place I used to work used outside molds for large volume items, and inside molds for low production and prototypes. Outside molds aren't too bad to build for violins, but they are a real chore for cellos and basses.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have tried an outside mold a few times, with that exact idea to make plates separately and interchangeable, but my tolerances weren't tight enough.  The end result had overhang variations more than I wanted.  I suppose more accurately made molds and templates would do better.

 

However, in the subject video, I'm not sure they make the plates separately.  It looks kinda sloppy for that, and making precisely cut plates seems unlikely in that shop...  but they might just use the outside mold to make the garland more quickly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

However, in the subject video, I'm not sure they make the plates separately.  It looks kinda sloppy for that, but they might just use the outside mold to make the garland more quickly.

 

I think the plates are being made separately (they aren't tracing individual rib garlands) but they don't seem to be finishing the outline until after the body is assembled. I do agree that here it looks like they are using an outside mold for speed reasons. Heck, they are clamping the corner blocks in place with the linings! 

 

The amount of tonewood is mind boggling.

 

"Tonewood" might be a bit optimistic. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am blown away. The amount of tonewood is mind boggling.

 

No machines too. I love that hand bow.

 

I wonder whether they have CTS issues.

 

I wonder which is more hazardous: working in an iPhone factory or working in a violin factory.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was particularly interested to see how many cutting and carving operations were done with long-handled gouges and chisels which are guided by the workers' hands but pushed by their shoulders.  These operations include fitting the bass bar, trimming the saddle cutout, carving the scroll, and fitting the neck, soundpost and bridge, among others.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...