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rottrunner

First varnish attempt

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Meh' call it patina, looks great, everyones got their way of "doing it" I would suggest you work on "clean" varnish at first, then step up to "antique" , it's not really harder, just different ways to get there and different levels....take a look at member "curious1's" maker gallery, he does excellent antique jobs.

 

Thank you!

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I suppose that's what you get for a relatively cheap white violin online. But now at least I know what bad woodwork looks like. :)

It's not bad rottrunner,  I was thinking the carver-wood shaper worker was hinting that they know what's going on but a potential customer will have their own way of how they want it to look.  Well. I hope they think that.  Are you really doing this on your own or do you have help?

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Another white violin that I ordered just came in, but it looks like they wrote on/stamped the neck of the violin (not on the FB surface). Anyone know how to get this crap off?

I'd use a razor blade slowly and carefully.

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It's not bad rottrunner,  I was thinking the carver-wood shaper worker was hinting that they know what's going on but a potential customer will have their own way of how they want it to look.  Well. I hope they think that.  Are you really doing this on your own or do you have help?

 

When I first opened that violin, I did notice that the scroll was relatively unattractive.  I have a few other partially carved scroll blocks that I'm going to practice on, so I thought I might as well not obsess over making my first varnishing violin perfect (because I'd probably ruin it).  But I agree, I think it's really likely that was the intention of the maker.

 

It's just me doing this alone, with the exception of the help that I get from everyone on this forum. =)  I have several books that have been very helpful as well, but as a very kinetic learner, I find it often best to just give things a careful and calculated whirl, and learn as I go.  I also don't have access to a woodshop yet, so I'm trying to make the best of my time by learning other things until I can get something set up.

 

And I'll definitely try a razor blade. That was my first idea, but I was a little hesitant lest I ruin the contour of the neck too badly.  I suppose I'll just have to see how it goes.

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Rotrunner,

 

It seems that you've got a natural feel for this.

That varnish start work looks first rate. You're really headed in the right direction. I believe that I will reread this entire post, and see if I missed it somewhere where you state that you refinish, or finish newly made furniture, or something of the sort...

 

Simply remove the writing on the necks by scraping or even sanding it off. I wouldn't necessarily use any liquid and try to rub it off, as it may smear, then sink further into the wood.

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When I first opened that violin, I did notice that the scroll was relatively unattractive.  I have a few other partially carved scroll blocks that I'm going to practice on, so I thought I might as well not obsess over making my first varnishing violin perfect (because I'd probably ruin it).  But I agree, I think it's really likely that was the intention of the maker.

 

It's just me doing this alone, with the exception of the help that I get from everyone on this forum. =)  I have several books that have been very helpful as well, but as a very kinetic learner, I find it often best to just give things a careful and calculated whirl, and learn as I go.  I also don't have access to a woodshop yet, so I'm trying to make the best of my time by learning other things until I can get something set up.

 

And I'll definitely try a razor blade. That was my first idea, but I was a little hesitant lest I ruin the contour of the neck too badly.  I suppose I'll just have to see how it goes.

We won't let you ruin the first one.  When it's time for finishing give the information about what you want to use.  Show photos of what you bought or have already.  Just say "Alright guys/gals I'm ready to start.  What do I do next?"  Just be patient and this will turn out good.

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The A peg hole is dangerously close to the upped edge of the peg box. 

 

This could be a very weak area when the hole is reamed.

 

Yes, the peg holes are really oddly spaced, I agree.  I didn't know it could weaken the whole area though, thank you for the heads up!

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Rotrunner,

 

It seems that you've got a natural feel for this.

That varnish start work looks first rate. You're really headed in the right direction. I believe that I will reread this entire post, and see if I missed it somewhere where you state that you refinish, or finish newly made furniture, or something of the sort...

 

Simply remove the writing on the necks by scraping or even sanding it off. I wouldn't necessarily use any liquid and try to rub it off, as it may smear, then sink further into the wood.

 

Thanks, Craig -- I really appreciate the encouragement.  Scout's honor, I've never touched any sort of woodworking in my life...except for that time I painted a bird house at summer camp when I was 8.  I'm fairly sure you won't be as impressed when I start posting my first attempts at scroll carving. =)

 

And that's a good point, I didn't consider that the ink could go even deeper through the wood.  I'll definitely go for the knife or the scraper.

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We won't let you ruin the first one.  When it's time for finishing give the information about what you want to use.  Show photos of what you bought or have already.  Just say "Alright guys/gals I'm ready to start.  What do I do next?"  Just be patient and this will turn out good.

 

Thanks, Uncle Duke!  I will do just that. =)  I did already purchase some tonewood, so I'm excited to get rolling with actually crafting one.  I don't think the tonewood is of the most impressive quality, but I think it's nice enough that it won't give me any undue troubles when I start working with it.  I'm a pretty impulsive person, but I'm very patient with carrying out my ideas, so hopefully that will help me through things, along with the help of all you experts in here.

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Wood is something that never is enough. Purchase low quality wood for immediate use for practice but also top quality wood as investment for the future, if you can allowed yourself for that, the older the better.

I regret until my last strand of hair for not did that when I start, now I have a very limited quantity to work with.

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Thanks, Uncle Duke!  I will do just that. =)  I did already purchase some tonewood, so I'm excited to get rolling with actually crafting one.  I don't think the tonewood is of the most impressive quality, but I think it's nice enough that it won't give me any undue troubles when I start working with it.  I'm a pretty impulsive person, but I'm very patient with carrying out my ideas, so hopefully that will help me through things, along with the help of all you experts in here.

Rottrunner, I like to think I know a lot about finishing, including violin.  There are at least 100 members here at Maestronet who are better qualified to help you.  Just because you don't hear from me in the future does not mean I'm not watching.  Good luck.

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That writing on the neck is probably just on the surface and could be sanded off.   It looks like it needs to be smoothed anyway.   It looks rough like it's been finished with a rasp.   So if you smooth it with sandpaper or scraper then the stamps and writing would probably be eliminated.

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May I ask from which company or store in China are these violins from? The back and front look very nice for varnishing practice, and that's what I like to experiment on. Also, your varnishing job looks exquisite so far, congratulations.

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May I ask from which company or store in China are these violins from? The back and front look very nice for varnishing practice, and that's what I like to experiment on. Also, your varnishing job looks exquisite so far, congratulations.

 

Hi there -- I purchased the one in the pictures from Howard Core.  They're not cheap, but they are quite nice, which is why I chose them.  I didn't want there to be any doubt whether it was the varnishing that was bad, or the violin, so these worked well for me.  

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Do you own gouges, scrapers, finger planes, etc.? It helps to get a thick board of lumber and make something arch-like as practice. Then practice applying a varnish system to that.

Not to say you will...if you mess up this varnish job, you can take it off and do it over. But you probably will mess it up. Which is expected, and doesn't mean you won't be great at this. What I mean is, you will often see guys on here who mess up varnish completely or they themselves will see a few flaws then act like it's not that bad or like they wouldn't even consider trying again. There is no reason to be like that. The idea should be to learn the most you can from this. :)

Playing with varnish is (imo) the most fun because you can nearly always do it over if you have to. I am postponing several woodworking things at the moment because I've put hours in and am very close to screwing up. The sensation can be unpleasant. Lol

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Do you own gouges, scrapers, finger planes, etc.? It helps to get a thick board of lumber and make something arch-like as practice. Then practice applying a varnish system to that.

Not to say you will...if you mess up this varnish job, you can take it off and do it over. But you probably will mess it up. Which is expected, and doesn't mean you won't be great at this. What I mean is, you will often see guys on here who mess up varnish completely or they themselves will see a few flaws then act like it's not that bad or like they wouldn't even consider trying again. There is no reason to be like that. The idea should be to learn the most you can from this. :)

Playing with varnish is (imo) the most fun because you can nearly always do it over if you have to. I am postponing several woodworking things at the moment because I've put hours in and am very close to screwing up. The sensation can be unpleasant. Lol

 

 

I do have a great set of gouges and scrapers, but I don't have the finger planes yet (those are next).  I'd also really like to get some graduating calipers, a myriad of other clamps, etc., but I'm having to purchase all the necessary tools in waves.  It seems as though because they're such specialized items, they're remarkably expensive (or maybe I'm just broke, haha).  I'll also unfortunately have to wait until I get somewhat of a proper workspace.  Wood shavings in the living room seems like it would be a poor idea.

 

And that's a really wonderful idea, finding some lumber pieces to practice graduations on -- brilliant, actually.  Do you think it matters what kind of wood I practice on?  Or will anything out of the scraps bin at Home Depot do the trick?

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While I'm thinking about it, does anyone have any recommendations for tools that have been invaluable to you, that would be suitable for beginner work?  So far, I've been surprised at how many uses I've found for my box of nitrile gloves.

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Be choosy (so as not to fill a third of your spare bedroom with scrap wood), but scraps are good. My husband actually made cellos from some very fine (not green) poplar wood found in a dumpster. Poplar, maple, willow, spruce...if you're just practicing it matters less, but those are the basic options. We use walnut and maple scraps for knife handles and for making other tools. If you're starting with no woodworking experience (like me) that is a good place to start. Anyway, why spend money on wood if you can get what you need in a dumpster? So at least look at Home Depot or wherever.

(Eta:cabinet shops throw away better quality wood and sometimes exotics)

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Be choosy (so as not to fill a third of your spare bedroom with scrap wood), but scraps are good. My husband actually made cellos from some very fine (not green) poplar wood found in a dumpster. Poplar, maple, willow, spruce...if you're just practicing it matters less, but those are the basic options. We use walnut and maple scraps for knife handles and for making other tools. If you're starting with no woodworking experience (like me) that is a good place to start. Anyway, why spend money on wood if you can get what you need in a dumpster? So at least look at Home Depot or wherever.

(Eta:cabinet shops throw away better quality wood and sometimes exotics)

 

I would never have considered a cabinet shop, but there's one right down the road from me.  That's an awesome idea -- thanks!

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