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Kallie

Warchal Brilliant vs Warchal Brilliant Vintage

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Have anyone tried these strings, and if so, is there a noticeable difference between the 2? They are priced the same, and the website says the Warchal Brilliant VINTAGE is specifically made for antique instruments.

 

Is this possible? And if so, how? What makes them better for Antique instruments?

 

I played on someone's violin yesterday which had this strings (not sure if it was the vintage or just the normal), and found it had a absolutely lovely sound, so I would want to try it on my own violin. Just not sure about the Vintage vs normal kind.

 

Thank you. :)

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I have a new set of Warchal Amber that I'm about to put on my new violin.  Amber is newer, I think.

 

Yes. Ive tried the Amber E string, and it is the current E string on my violin. The sound is nice, but unfortunately the "E string whistling" was not eliminated even though it says it is supposed to.

 

Let me know what you think of the set though.

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I've been using Ambers on my main violin for the last year or so, and am very happy with them. I haven't gotten around to trying the other Warchal lines, but I probably will at some point as I like these very much.

 

Just to be more precise, I tried the Ambers first on a slightly bright and "edgy" vieux paris violin (a Frébrunet), and they didn't do much for me on that fiddle. It seems to work better with Corelli Alliances which tend to be a little "dark" to me.

 

I then tried the Ambers on my Buchstetter, which is generally balanced, neither too dark nor too bright, and they give me excellent response and a wide range of colours and dynamics, giving me better results on that violin than the Infelds, Domninats, Visions, Corellis and Pirazzis I've had a chance to try on it.

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Yes. Ive tried the Amber E string, and it is the current E string on my violin. The sound is nice, but unfortunately the "E string whistling" was not eliminated even though it says it is supposed to.

 

Let me know what you think of the set though.

 

I'll post some audio clips ones the violin is finished.  Will do a final polish and final set up this Thursday or Friday.

 

Probably will put on a set of old Dominants first for the set up and then the Warchal.  Stay tuned!

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Amber and Brilliants are quite different.

Amber (apart from the non-whistling E) are as I understand it an attempt to come as close as possible to the sound of gut-core strings, but with a stable synthetic core. The sound is a bit fluffy for my taste, but that's a problem I've always had with gut-core strings (Eudoxa, Oliv etc).

Brilliants are very definitely a synthetic, but as described ... brilliant. Very powerful, zingy, and sort of Karneol on steroids.

The Brilliant Vintage strings are very similar but work at lower tension, thereby putting less stress on your worm-ridden, paper thin and cracked to buggery Guarneri ...

Personally, I'm a big fan of Warchal strings, but I rarely feel the need to use anything except Karneol ...

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Amber and Brilliants are quite different.

Amber (apart from the non-whistling E) are as I understand it an attempt to come as close as possible to the sound of gut-core strings, but with a stable synthetic core. The sound is a bit fluffy for my taste, but that's a problem I've always had with gut-core strings (Eudoxa, Oliv etc).

Brilliants are very definitely a synthetic, but as described ... brilliant. Very powerful, zingy, and sort of Karneol on steroids.

The Brilliant Vintage strings are very similar but work at lower tension, thereby putting less stress on your worm-ridden, paper thin and cracked to buggery Guarneri ...

Personally, I'm a big fan of Warchal strings, but I rarely feel the need to use anything except Karneol ...

 

Thank you, Martin. I thought the difference between Brilliant and Vintage for antique instruments would be the sound. Didn't consider that it might be the lowered tension to reduce stress on the instrument.

 

As for Karneol, I tried them on my violin once. They were good and all, but I found them a little weak. Same with my viola. The problem on the violin was specifically the A-string in 3rd position and higher.

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Have anyone tried these strings, and if so, is there a noticeable difference between the 2? They are priced the same, and the website says the Warchal Brilliant VINTAGE is specifically made for antique instruments.

 

Is this possible? And if so, how? What makes them better for Antique instruments?

 

I played on someone's violin yesterday which had this strings (not sure if it was the vintage or just the normal), and found it had a absolutely lovely sound, so I would want to try it on my own violin. Just not sure about the Vintage vs normal kind.

 

Thank you. :)

Brilliant and Brilliant Vintage really sound very different from each other. Brilliant sounded brash and metallic on the violins and violas I fitted them on. I once asked Bohdan Warchal about the "antique instrument" indication. He replied that it they should be suitable on "good violins". This I found to be true. I like the tone, as well as the quick response.

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Many customers ask us why a 100 years old instrument should be strung by different strings than the new one. Every instrument is unique of course, but there are some obvious rules and trends.

 

Please consider that instruments build until the beginning of 20th century were designed solely to gut strings. The tension of such strings was literally a half of the tension of metal strings and some of  „modern“ synthetic strings.

 

In the first half of the 20th century, high tension metal strings started to be used, although not all of the violinmakers and players decided to follow this trend. However, the trend of tension increase has been obvious and this is why older instruments use to be „choked“ by high tension strings in much more frequently then the contemporary ones.

 

When first synthetic strings emerged (about 40 years ago), their tension was still moderate, but it has been rising by every new model (and maybe even within the same model) of strings until today.

 

However, there are also some of the contemporary violins, that „doesn’t need to be forced to play by excessive bow pressure“ and are easy to play. Such instruments work with Brilliant Vintage very well too.

 

In my opinion, if a contemporary violin works well with moderate tension strings, it is a sign of high quality of the instrument. This is why I told Jacob the explanation.  

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Brilliant and Brilliant Vintage really sound very different from each other. Brilliant sounded brash and metallic on the violins and violas I fitted them on. I once asked Bohdan Warchal about the "antique instrument" indication. He replied that it they should be suitable on "good violins". This I found to be true. I like the tone, as well as the quick response.

 

Thank you Jacob. My first thought when playing on the Brilliant was that it sounded metallic, but the sound was still good. I think it was the normal Brilliant though, not the vintage.

I will order the Vintage for my next set and see how it works on my violin. :)

Ive wanted to try Evah Pirazzi strings on my violin for a while now, and if I understood correctly from previous topics, they are higher tension than normal. So trying high tension Evah's and low tension Warchals might be a good way to see which works best.

 

 

Many customers ask us why a 100 years old instrument should be strung by different strings than the new one. Every instrument is unique of course, but there are some obvious rules and trends.

 

Please consider that instruments build until the beginning of 20th century were designed solely to gut strings. The tension of such strings was literally a half of the tension of metal strings and some of  „modern“ synthetic strings.

 

In the first half of the 20th century, high tension metal strings started to be used, although not all of the violinmakers and players decided to follow this trend. However, the trend of tension increase has been obvious and this is why older instruments use to be „choked“ by high tension strings in much more frequently then the contemporary ones.

 

When first synthetic strings emerged (about 40 years ago), their tension was still moderate, but it has been rising by every new model (and maybe even within the same model) of strings until today.

 

However, there are also some of the contemporary violins, that „doesn’t need to be forced to play by excessive bow pressure“ and are easy to play. Such instruments work with Brilliant Vintage very well too.

 

In my opinion, if a contemporary violin works well with moderate tension strings, it is a sign of high quality of the instrument. This is why I told Jacob the explanation.  

 

Thank you Bohdan for the good explanation. :)

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Yes. Ive tried the Amber E string, and it is the current E string on my violin. The sound is nice, but unfortunately the "E string whistling" was not eliminated even though it says it is supposed to.

 

 

Kallie, you seems to be the only customer refering insufficient whistling protection. Are you sure that you are not touching the E string by the root of your left index finger at the moment of string crossing inadvertendly  :mellow: ? This is what not any E string is able to cope with. 

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Bohdan, again I would implore you to look into expanding into the steel string guitar market. Your attention to detail and knowledge would be very welcome, as well as your level of personal involvement. I feel there is a huge demand for guitar strings with different tension set ups, many would use them in order to string higher {fat} gauge sets on for alternate tunings, and then ofcourse just like with violins, certain guitars will "live" longer with lower tension.

 

Granted guitar string sets retail prices are much cheaper by the set as compared to violin strings, however there are probably 100 guiars sold to every one violin, so something tellsme that if you expanded into this market, you would do ok, particularly if you "tout" that you are coming to the guitar world from the violin world, advanced guitarist's, rightfully so, seem to have a high opinion of luthiers and guitar makers who also have bowed instrument knowledge.

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Kallie, you seems to be the only customer refering insufficient whistling protection. Are you sure that you are not touching the E string by the root of your left index finger at the moment of string crossing inadvertendly  :mellow: ? This is what not any E string is able to cope with. 

 

Hi Bohdan, Yes, I'm quite sure I'm not touching the e-string with any other finger when crossing strings. Ive tested multiple times, and unfortunately it still whistles. It does it less than the Gold Label E Pirastro, but unfortunately it is still there.

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I would recommend Kallie to take your violin to a good luthier who can probably fix it.

 

Thank you for the advice, but as far as I know, the whistling E string isn't something which can be fixed by a different set-up or adjustment. Ive seen Itzhak Perlman's Stradivarius' E string whistle. Every violin Ive played on had this problem, even handmade and properly set-up violins. This is why Non-Whistling E strings (such as Warchal Amber E and Kaplan Solution) were invented.

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My E also squeaks depending on how I hit it with the bow...is that what you're referring to?

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My E also squeaks depending on how I hit it with the bow...is that what you're referring to?

 

I think of "Squeak" and "Whistling" as 2 different things. Squeaks can be prevented with perfect bowing, and whistling is just something which might happen due to the string. Whistling can sometimes be avoided though when you bow differently.

 

Look at 4:25 on this video.

 

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Thank you for the advice, but as far as I know, the whistling E string isn't something which can be fixed by a different set-up or adjustment. Ive seen Itzhak Perlman's Stradivarius' E string whistle. Every violin Ive played on had this problem, even handmade and properly set-up violins. This is why Non-Whistling E strings (such as Warchal Amber E and Kaplan Solution) were invented.

 

Non-whistling strings are a band-aid to a broken leg. You should listen to Torbjorn and take the violin to somebody who knows what he's doing.

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Thank you for the advice, but as far as I know, the whistling E string isn't something which can be fixed by a different set-up or adjustment.

 

In my experience, not true. Soundpost, bridge, string angle - all of these can cause a whistling E, and when addressed, the whistling E is no more.

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You could try on a heavier gauge E string. The whistle often comes from the string twisting and a heavier i.e. thicker E string has less of a twisting motion. Because it's stiffer.

 

Thanx for the advice. :) I might try this some time when buying strings again.

 

 

In my experience, not true. Soundpost, bridge, string angle - all of these can cause a whistling E, and when addressed, the whistling E is no more.

 

Thank you Jacob. I will start looking at this and see if I can personally find a correlation between the setup and whistling. :)

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Thanx for the advice. :) I might try this some time when buying strings again.

 

 

 

Thank you Jacob. I will start looking at this and see if I can personally find a correlation between the setup and whistling. :)

The whole issue about the ability of set-up avoiding whistling seems to be more complex and still covered a bit with a mystery. I have learned a lot of luthiers claiming they are able to help. They were quite successful in some cases whilst failing in other ones. 

 

I am not going to argue, I am still learning and this is why I enjoy attending disscusions on MN. However our thorough research showed quite opposite effect. The thicker E string the worse. Torbjorn is right, whistling is caused by the "rotation" of the string around its centre instead of correct vibrating. Please consider that the thicker string, the farther is the contact point from the wire centre, so the higher is the tangential force that may initiate unwanted rotating movement. 

 

Moreover, as we found, the most significant cause of whistling is lack of elasticity. The string simply generate too much resistance (being not able to stretch and therefore to start vibrating) at the very beginning of the tone (bowing).

 

It is not easy to believe Amber E could whistle. It would be great having the chance playing your instrument. Internet is a great tool that enables us sharing and swapping our opinions and experiences.  However the amount of information transferred by internet has its limit unfortunately. 

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I remember reading someone saying in some forum that sanding the E-string around the bowing area with a very fine sand-paper can help reduce whistling.  I won't ever do such a thing but if nothing else works, this might be something to try as long as you use really cheap E strings.

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