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saintjohnbarleycorn

strad article, string vibration video

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The question in my mind is whether this is a accurate representation of the string vibration, or is some of this caused by the "refresh rate" of the camera creating a partial illusion? But there's no doubt in my mind that violin strings have very complex vibrations. That's why I find a stroboscopic tuner to be very accurate and reliable for tuning my classical guitar, but far less reliable for tuning my violin. This is because the bowed violin string isn't really outputting a simple wave form or consistent frequency, but instead jumps around.

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It says 24 frames per second.  So you are seeing an aliasing effect like a backward-spinning car wheel.  If they shot it at 2400 frames per second and do a slow motion at 0.01x speed, then maybe we can see how exactly the strings vibrate.  However, the individual frames do tell us that the strings look like at a particular instant.

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This shows that the string is producing a lot of High frequency

energy.  The bridge filters most of it out.  If you want to hear

it make a solid bridge with no holes, and thicker than usual.

That will show you why the bridge is sooo important to

violin sound.  

 

I month ago our orchestra performed the Gabrielli  sonata

Pian e Fort.  It turns out that Gabrielli wrote a VIOLA part

to go with all the brass.  I played it at the concert.  15 Brass,

one Viola.  Doubling the first horn part in choir 2.  The brass

sound with relatively fewer high overtones, the viola with

quite a lot of high frequency marking the melody.  The viola

was audible.

 

The string sound has a lot of high frequency content, 

shown in this video as short waveforms in the strings.

Thankfully killed by a properly cut bridge.

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It's possible to see something like that if you plug the string and watch the vibration against a TV screen as a background (the old ones big boxes capable to show static noise only).

Don't ask why that work, could be just an optical illusion, but it is interesting.

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It's possible to see something like that if you plug the string and watch the vibration against a TV screen as a background (the old ones big boxes capable to show static noise only).

Don't ask why that work, could be just an optical illusion, but it is interesting.

It might not be an illusion.  TVs have a scan rate.  It's like a stroboscope.

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