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What is she playing?


jezzupe
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Ofcourse, this happens in every music video ever. Unless the music video is a live recording, which it hardly ever is.

Which begs the question...then what CAN we take away from a music video? Regarding movement and playing at any rate...because if we don't know if they were moving and playing at the same time...we can't comment... :ph34r:

 

Where is Addie?  I need dancing, violin-playing emoticons! ^_^

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Which begs the question...then what CAN we take away from a music video? Regarding movement and playing at any rate...because if we don't know if they were moving and playing at the same time...we can't comment... :ph34r:

 

Where is Addie?  I need dancing, violin-playing emoticons! ^_^

 

A music video is mostly for visual entertainment.  If you want to hear live playing, that's what live concerts are for. :D

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Well being in a varnish phase right now, I think it was the varnish that caught my eye, not for all the right reasons.

 

1. This violin must have been very well taken care of it's entire life, it looks VERY unworn, either that or V's varnish is hard as a rock...

 

2. That being said, it's appearance is that of a 120$ cheapo, in that flame is killed at almost all angles, it seems "muddy" looking and generally I just don't like it.

 

3.Which creates a situation where one needs to make choices, if faced with a similar situation in real life, would I let the sound over ride the look, which of course I would. But I would wish that I liked the varnish more.

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OK, now I'm confused.  You're saying it sounds like an adolescent boy making a rude noise by deflating a rubber animal, or do you mean the subtle swishing sound of wadding tissues into an empty codpiece?

One should always use cod in ones codpiece (duh).  Live goldfish are acceptable though if the situation calls for animation. Never piranha!

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Well being in a varnish phase right now, I think it was the varnish that caught my eye, not for all the right reasons.

 

1. This violin must have been very well taken care of it's entire life, it looks VERY unworn, either that or V's varnish is hard as a rock...

 

2. That being said, it's appearance is that of a 120$ cheapo, in that flame is killed at almost all angles, it seems "muddy" looking and generally I just don't like it.

 

3.Which creates a situation where one needs to make choices, if faced with a similar situation in real life, would I let the sound over ride the look, which of course I would. But I would wish that I liked the varnish more.

IMHO, trying to work from photos, while often the only road available, is always chancy.  Compare the (pretty obviously color modified, contrast compensated, and retouched) photo below with the others  :rolleyes:

 

1200x-1.jpg

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Vuillaumes are a mixed bag - when I had only played a handful I thought they were vastly overpriced and generally very poor in tone. Now the figure is in the low 20s and I have changed my mind ...

I still think they're vastly overpriced - simply because they're fine trade instruments and sort of the opposite of what they are considered to be. However, at least a third have sounded excellent. Perhaps not terribly idiosyncratic, but just great all-round musical instruments.

But this should be no surprise - the same is true of most HC Silvestres, Derazeys, even Collin-Mezin Sr ...

The problem is that the average Vuillaume is really a bit unpleasant!

 

Jezzupe - I agree they do tend to look overly well preserved, and I assume this is because the varnish is somewhat akin to car paint. They don't look like great violins even when they are, though the earliest ones from the 1840s seem to be rather different in conception and generally much nicer to look at. There's even an outside chance that Vuillaume made some of these :D

 

The ex-Nathan Posner coming up at the next Ingles & Hayday sale is a great sounding example.

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So one can have a fiddle that looks like a dG.

 

It is easy to underestimate appearance.

 

A decent fiddle in the hands of a decent fiddler will sound decent.  Might as well look like something, too.

 

But we are talking about a JBV Il Cannone copy here.  Is this the same violin that he copied for Paganini?   If so, I'm sure he wanted it to sound like Il Cannone.

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I doubt it - if so he would have made the back a bit thicker!

 

Dwight - Vuillaume was a maker, but he also employed many superb makers who worked to his model.

It's a very interesting question how one should assess such instruments - the problem crops up again and again, Stradivaris, Strnad Workshop, Sartory bows, Silvestres made by Blanchard, Scarampellas etc.

Some experts regard the identity of the maker as unimportant, provided the model and the standard of execution are those of the head of the workshop (no-one would describe a Sartory made by Morizot or Fétique as anything other than a Sartory). Others think it's important to distinguish between a Salomon made by Salomon and a Salomon made by Chappuy, a Strnad made by Homolka, or a Scarampella made by Gaetano Gadda. 

For now, Vuillaume violins remain in the first category ... bows emphatically in the second. How mad is that!

I find this inconsistency pretty strange. In one instance it causes a significant devaluation of an instrument, in another instance it makes no difference, in another instance the value is greater for putting a name to the employee. 

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One would assume that the young, hungry, ambitious Vuillaume would have made his instruments entirely himself, because he was truly a gifted maker.  But wouldn't it be hard for the later, great-businessman Vuillaume not to have taken advantage of his large workforce and let others in the shop do a lot of the "busy-work" even on whatever production he finished himself?  I have never read anything one way or another on this aspect.  There must be people with enough expertise who would have an opinion.

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I think it's safe to assume that the majority of Vuillaumes were made by people other than Vuilluame. HC Silvestre, Derazey, Paul Bailly, George Gemunder etc, all established themselves post-Vuillaume as independent makers capable of producing violins of the same calibre, and if they weren't making violins for Vuillaume you have to wonder what they were doing in his employ. Perhaps to be charitable to Vuillaume we can assume that he occasionally pulled his finger out for a "special" or a bench copy.

The outside-mold system used in the French shops, coupled with the love of precision and absence of tool marks, does allow for various people to make essentially the same model of violin. However, I'm sure there are specialists who can distinguish different makers in the Vuillaume shop.

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Yup, I guarantee if she played with any good brand new violin and you could not see the instrument she would sound like a goddess.

 

Unfortunately I cannot open all these interesting looking videos here in Germany.

 

However, it seems to me that Dwight's statement is right on the button. Anyone who has attended a few top master classes, cannot have failed to see how great players are able bring out so much more quality and power from the instruments of their students. It is not always (hardly ever) about expensive instruments when people like Hahn are playing. I just hope that she does not end up paying two high a price for her undoubted prowess. 

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It is an old Suzuki "trick" to play on the student's instrument once in a while at lessons.  So that they know there is nothing magic in the teacher's instrument that they cannot have.  This is more important in some ways with smaller children and smaller instruments but can be good as students get older and become aware of quality issues with their present instrument.  I remember as a student we could talk for hours about fiddles and bows and how we would like to try a such and such violin, etc.  Once in a while one of our greater lights would go to a big shop and get a chance to play some of the big stuff and we would gather around to listen like he was Jesus delivering the sermon on the mount.  I treasure the very short times that I have gotten to play an Amati, Guadanini, and a Landolfi.  I hate to say it but the biggest impression on me was the Landolfi, it was as they say, just like buttah :-)  On the reality end of the stick nothing other than a triple ear/brain/arm transplant with a tiny bit of "get off you fat lazy ass and practice!" would really help!

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I think it's safe to assume that the majority of Vuillaumes were made by people other than Vuilluame. HC Silvestre, Derazey, Paul Bailly, George Gemunder etc, all established themselves post-Vuillaume as independent makers capable of producing violins of the same calibre, and if they weren't making violins for Vuillaume you have to wonder what they were doing in his employ. Perhaps to be charitable to Vuillaume we can assume that he occasionally pulled his finger out for a "special" or a bench copy.

The outside-mold system used in the French shops, coupled with the love of precision and absence of tool marks, does allow for various people to make essentially the same model of violin. However, I'm sure there are specialists who can distinguish different makers in the Vuillaume shop.

 

 

Does anyone teach or much use the outside mold method these days?  I guess that the mold making would take a great deal more time.  

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