Finishing a fingerboard with olive oil?


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I do the final sanding of the fingerboard after applying mineral oil.  The idea is that the pores in the wood will be filled with a slurry of oil and sanding dust.  After the final sanding, I wipe off any oil remaining on the surface.  I think olive oil would work just as well.

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I seem to recall reading about wiping on and polishing a fingerboard with olive oil as part of setting up.  Does anyone do this?

Only if it's made of celery.  Don't forget the vinegar and garlic. [Munching noises] 

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I seem to recall reading about wiping on and polishing a fingerboard with olive oil as part of setting up.  Does anyone do this?

I always use the olive oil instead of mineral oil because the both are not of the drying kind and because I always have the virgin olive oil at hand, but not the mineral one, since my daughter came out of diapers.

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I've tried using mineral oil as a part of the finishing process, and I know of a few people who use it. I'd be reluctant to use olive oil or any other food grade oil that could become rancid over time. Although I think mineral oil is a better alternative, I'm reluctant to recommend it. In my experience, I've found that oil used to finish the board tends to leave behind a film that attracts dirt and metal debris from the string windings. It's harder to clean off a fingerboard that has an oily buildup on it. As a player, I don't like it when I can leave fingerprints on the board.

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I use liquid paraffin. I get it in the pharmacy, where it's sold as a laxative.

 

I sand the ebony, wash it off with a pad and warm water, and polish it with fine steel wool and oil. I don't think there's a need to go right up through the sanding grits, and I don't like a mirror shine, just a good even sheen.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rancidification

 

imo, it's not a great idea, I  mean it will work, but VOO has a shelf life of 2-3 years, after that the fats will breakdown and go rancid. Now granted we are not licking our fingerboards {hopefully} but it could impart a stink, and worse case scenario it could create a mold reaction that could start to "fester" . I'm sure it could be done and is, I know people that use it as a lube for grain fill, but I personally think cutting board grade mineral oil is a better choice

 

"huh'huh, hey, smell my finger...board" :lol:

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Actually, really, if you have the time and patience, I think Cohiba oil is really the best. This was something that Carlo suggested I try, I think Schleske determined that Cohiba increases radiation.

 

Anyway the stuff we got is really thick, I've used it straight, diluted in solvent, and mixed with other oils...The thing that seems to be unique is that it goes on thick and syrupy, you just leave it on the wood and let it slowly soak in....Once soaked in, the finger board feels kinda "sticky", initially I thought it was not good, BUT as time goes by and it dries {1 month} suddenly it starts to act like wax on skis....like a paraffin. It does require patience, and I don't think is something you would want to put on and then ship it out right away, but If you have the time it its pretty cool, and may have some minor acoustic benefits

 

Howard orange oil is also a very good oil that can go on after other oils have been first applied.

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Actually, really, if you have the time and patience, I think Cohiba oil is really the best. This was something that Carlo suggested I try, I think Schleske determined that Cohiba increases radiation.

 

Anyway the stuff we got is really thick, I've used it straight, diluted in solvent, and mixed with other oils...The thing that seems to be unique is that it goes on thick and syrupy, you just leave it on the wood and let it slowly soak in....Once soaked in, the finger board feels kinda "sticky", initially I thought it was not good, BUT as time goes by and it dries {1 month} suddenly it starts to act like wax on skis....like a paraffin. It does require patience, and I don't think is something you would want to put on and then ship it out right away, but If you have the time it its pretty cool, and may have some minor acoustic benefits

 

Martin Schleske acoustic analysis of violin varnish:

 

....The changes in the speed of sound and damping were measured after a drying interval of nine years. Spruce wood strips were used as the support material with a grain orientation transverse to the longitudinal direction of the strip and a thickness of 3.0 mm.......The increase in the speed of sound.....The leader is copaiba balsam (+18.8% compared to untreated wood).

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Reiterating the lesson, while keeping it simple (for those of us with minimal mental storage space):  to oil a fingerboard, use linseed oil with drier additive.

 

Do not use food oils.  Other oils may work...but then it starts getting complicated again...

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