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DonLeister

Rehairs and blending hair

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Sometimes I need to blend hair for a rehair, maybe black with white or turn the ends around and I have some difficulty getting a nice blend. Is there a technique to this that some one would share here?

I do a lot of rehairing using 31-32" hair, which is sorted well, expensive, stallion I'm told, but it does have a fair amount of color and thickness taper on long it's length so I see that in the resulting rehair.

I have bought some 36" hair which has much less taper and color change, is more expensive, looks better but word from customers is that the hair doesn't respond or bite as good as the other I have. This 36" hair will have much more hair at the tip compared to the other since I measure my hanks near the frog end when I start. But even when I lessen the amount the response is still not as good.

The reason I mention all this is because the type of hair or the orientation of the ends results in a different amount of hair in the bow. I am experimenting with turning some of the hair in a hank around when I start to make a more consistent ribbon.

I should mention that the bows I do are for students, all levels, many amateurs and professionals, not a lot of really high end bows. I generally don't sort out much hair, only the most obvious bad hairs.

I am interested in others ideas about the amount or characteristics of the hair you use and especially if you can share a trick to blending it.

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I am interested in others ideas about the amount or characteristics of the hair you use and especially if you can share a trick to blending it.

 

Been there, and I have gone through the theoretical process (and practical)  aspects of equalizing the width and thickness of the ribbon, throughout the rehair. End for end like you describe here.

 

After many many rehairs, I have come to the conclusion that the stained (weaker - thinner) part or end of the hair ribbon, does go best towards the tip end of the bow, where the width of the ribbon (on violin bows, in particular) are narrower in width, and where the techniques of playing are usually slighter and less powerful and less dramatic than they are at the frog end.

Not to mention that the frog ferrule is wider, and etc. 

Though end for end mixing or the ribbon does work, and I do believe that most people doing rehairs will eventually do this for whatever reasons (even if only to see what the results are) - the standard and classical way does have some valid reasons for following it.

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We don't use bending sticks in our rehairs... is that a frog to tip thing?

 

For blending we usually just pinch and roll between fingers, split it in half, pinch and roll and split, pinch and roll and split... but it always seems like the black ends up all on the bottom or top. ::Shrug::

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We don't use bending sticks in our rehairs... is that a frog to tip thing?

 

For blending we usually just pinch and roll between fingers, split it in half, pinch and roll and split, pinch and roll and split... but it always seems like the black ends up all on the bottom or top. ::Shrug::

Maybe.  I haven't seen enough people doing other methods to really comment.  I use a turning (bending) stick for tensioning the hair when going from frog to tip.  What do tip to frog people use for tensioning the hair?

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I was trained to do tip to frog years back, using the bending stick before doing the know on the frog end. To be honest I never quite understood its use. 

 

 

Nowadays all my rehairs are done frog to tip. It takes me a little longer to do them but I have better control of little details that after many rehairs, find make all the difference in the quality and functionality. 

 

Also, since I want to use as much of the hair from the bottom end (the one closest to the skin) as possible, doing frog to tip allows me to just cut off waste at the tip. 

 

I am stupidly anal about not having crossing hairs in my ribbon. 

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For blending we usually just pinch and roll between fingers, split it in half, pinch and roll and split, pinch and roll and split... but it always seems like the black ends up all on the bottom or top. ::Shrug::

I see how that would help blend the hairs, you split it several times. Yeah, it's really noticeable when your blending black hairs!

Do you do it with white hair or just tie the hank the way it comes off the bundle?

Mathew I use the comb to turn the hair and push my preliminary knot back past my mark , then tie a second tighter knot up to the mark.

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I was trained to do tip to frog years back, using the bending stick before doing the kno[t] on the frog end...

 

That's also how I was taught almost 25 years ago, and that's how I still do it.

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Me also.

 

But - there are many successful and "correct" ways to rehair bows.

Tip to frog, frog to tip, bending stick, no bending stick, and yadda, yadda, yadda, etc., etc., etc..

Anyone that says that they have the one correct way - watch out.

 

It's the results that count.

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For just white hair (unless asked to blend ends) we just tie it straight off the bundle.

That's how I do it too and with the distal end at the tip. I don't think most players even think about it, which end is where, but it is pretty noticeable visually. I'm not enough of a player to say how it affects the playability. Maybe not that much?

I have learned rehairing from two instructors and had one say it doesn't matter and another say it does. Are there any professionals here that might comment?

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Maybe.  I haven't seen enough people doing other methods to really comment.  I use a turning (bending) stick for tensioning the hair when going from frog to tip.  What do tip to frog people use for tensioning the hair?

 

We mark it where the top of the knot should be with our pen, pull the comb back through to straighten all the hairs back out, we put the knot around the hair and bend it with a finger and pull the knot tight. It's a lot simpler than it sounds. It's also really easy to tighten the hair if need be (oh how i hate carbon fiber bows, it's like rehairing them twice in order to get the hair the right length because it stretches so much). 

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In Roger Foster's video he talks about horse hair barbs having a directionality and reverses half of the hank so that the hair will behave more consistent with up and down strokes. Do any of you have thoughts on this, I've never done it but it seems to make sense to me. 

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In Roger Foster's video he talks about horse hair barbs having a directionality and reverses half of the hank so that the hair will behave more consistent with up and down strokes. Do any of you have thoughts on this, I've never done it but it seems to make sense to me.

That makes sense but I think the barbs would be most effective on the upbow gravity would assist with the down bow. IMHO I'm just talking out my are. Fan Tao at D'Adarrio (probably spelled that wrong) does a lot of studies on enersia and the strings reaction to different bows or something like that. He would be the best person to ask for real answers.

Although it maybe so minute its not audible, but I'd you want to blend every rehair you go right ahead.

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well the horse hail does have scales which lay overlapping to the tip but I have seen a study that showed that these are rubbed off very quickly with the first rosining and then the rosin crystals are embedded into the softer core of the hair, the article was in either scientific american or smithsonian magazine in the 1980's sometime, wish i made a copy,

 

 

Reese

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