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troutabout

Real or not ?

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 The left side of the label is gone and I'm tempted to take the top off to search for it but not in any big hurry. I'm curious if anyone can tell me the meaning or importance of the bottom line word on this label ? Thanks.......

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Fecit Mediolani means "made Milan." G. B. Guadanini lived and worked there from about 1750 to 1758. Whoever made your violin was likely trying to imitate this authentic label from that period.

Edit: I should qualify my remark. Your violin's label was not necessarily installed by the violin's maker.

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Fecit Mediolani means "made Milan." G. B. Guadanini lived and worked there from about 1750 to 1758. Whoever made your violin was likely trying to imitate this authentic label from the period.

Edit: I should qualify my remark. That label was not necessarily installed by the violin's maker.

    Thanks. I doubted the authenticity myself. The neck isn't grafted but there is a great deal of soot inside where it had been played back in the days of candle light and oil lamps so mid/late 1800's early 1900's would be appropriate age. The Mediolani had me stumped.

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Could you elaborate on what features identify it as Caussin school?

The "cloudy" appearance of the varnish antiquing at the back, the form of the pegbox/scroll with short scroll, edges and purfling - and Peter would say, the typical wood of the belly :rolleyes: ...

Please try the search function with "Caussin" and you will find more examples.

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BF and Peter, what method of building did they mainly use in Caussin construction (inside, outside molds, BOB)?   jeff

By the early-mid 19thc., most Mirecourt makers had abandoned BOB for the outside mold, but some occasionally seem to have used inside molds as well. It can actually be hard to tell, because often the 19thc. style inside mold has a "notch"-style cut-out for the corner blocks, instead of the "square" cremonese-style cut-out, which leaves corner blocks with an equilateral triangle shape, pretty much the same as the usual outside-mold look. When you look at the inside of a Lupot or a Vuillaume, you see a conscious effort to replicate Cremonese-style blocks, but you can't really tell if the violin was built on an inside or outside mold. Among the relics of the Vuillaume shop there are both.

 

François Caussin seems to have started working in the Didier Nicolas or Gaillard (or both) shop in Mirecourt, before moving to Neufchateau. I saw an early "hand-made" violin by him (certified by Rampal) that I would have thought was a fine ca.1800 Paris violin (I thought it was a Bassot. Rampal has a neat endoscope which he uses to hunt for hidden signatures and brands!). He started later making fairly "creative" antiqued copies of italian violins, sometimes reasonably accurate (his Testore model with scratched-on purfling can sometimes make you look twice), most of the time not even close, and with his sons developped a certain antiquing "style" and process that was soon picked-up and used by probably every large quantity Mirecourt producer. So, you have Caussin family violins, and "Caussin school" violins. The Caussin family violins can be quite nice, and break with the "usual" Strad-inspired Mirecourt model. The "Caussin school" violins can be anything from well-made good sounding violins to the lowest grade of low-cost/high-output fiddle-making.

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Thanks Michael, for this lot of information!

I agree, that it can sometimes very, very tricky to decide how this 19th (or even late 18th) ct. violins were made; I had and have some with a one piece lower rib (with notch and without), linings glued 1 cm on top of the blocks and other variations.

Reg. the OP violin, it looks much like a product from the early JTL shop. Did you notice the soundpost crack in the back?

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