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Oil of Spike Lavendar...


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For an experiment I took some terpene resin and diluted it down to a water consistency with spike lavender oil and applied to a sample of maple. Looks nice but my question is will there be adhesion issues with an application of oil varnish on top?

 

What about rosin oil? It also looks nice but I'd like to know about possible adhesion issues.

 

My thought is to use it very thinned down to almost act as a sizing. I was thinking of using this as the first thing to hit the wood instead of gelatin.

 

Thoughts...

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Protein as the first coating doesn't appeal to me at all.

 

After using a thinned resinous first coating, and then burnishing, a second coating approach could be:

 

Add a bit of alum and ammonium chloride to a very weak sugar and gum solution.

 

Pass the wood back and forth near a fire.

 

Wash and dry thoroughly, then start varnishing.

 

I expect the aluminum and chloride ions together present in the system will mordant the wood sufficiently to prevent adhesion problems.

 

PM me if this works out for you?

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Thanks Joe. Any adhesion problems sizing with straight very thinned down rosin...no oil added? I found that the rosin oil looks better than a short oil varnish. I'm talking about Kremer's rosin oil.

http://www.kremer-pigmente.com/media/files_public/79282-79284e.pdf

http://shop.kremerpigments.com/en/mediums--binders-und-glues/solvent-soluble-binders/varnishes/turpentine-rosin-oil-thin-79284:.html

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Thanks Joe. Any adhesion problems sizing with straight very thinned down rosin...no oil added? I found that the rosin oil looks better than a short oil varnish. I'm talking about Kremer's rosin oil.

http://www.kremer-pigmente.com/media/files_public/79282-79284e.pdf

http://shop.kremerpigments.com/en/mediums--binders-und-glues/solvent-soluble-binders/varnishes/turpentine-rosin-oil-thin-79284:.html

Ernie,

I know that other people use this method and that it has an interesting "look".  Personally there are too many potential adhesion issues for me to recommend it...I am just uneasy with material that does not cure out to some stable form.

Joe

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Ernie,

Oil of spike is very, very slow to dry completely.  Rosin oil gets absorbed, but also is extremely slow to dry...if it ever does.

Joe

Joe

I put two drops of spike lavender on a piece of white paper and it evaporates completely without leaving a residue. Two drops of fresh turpentine evaporate much faster but also does not leave any residue on white Xerox paper. However...old thick oxidized turpentine on paper leaves a residue and does not really dry well.

Since Kremers rosin oil is just colophony and turpentine...Is it the turpentine element that you consider unstable?

Your balsam ground system is based on pine resins in alcohol and turpentine...is it not? and the end user must thin with fresh turpentine and alcohol.

The only thing that I would agree with is if the Kremer rosin oil sits too long on the shelf the turpentine could start to thicken and then that would cause drying issues.

So comparing your balsam ground system which as you have stated is basically pine sap thinned with solvent and applied in thin layers to plain colophony thinned with solvent. I see little difference.

However I do see a difference when any oil is combined with colophony in these early coats. the oil seems to clog up and produce a more burned look very slightly.

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Joe

I put two drops of spike lavender on a piece of white paper and it evaporates completely without leaving a residue. Two drops of fresh turpentine evaporate much faster but also does not leave any residue on white Xerox paper. However...old thick oxidized turpentine on paper leaves a residue and does not really dry well.

Since Kremers rosin oil is just colophony and turpentine...Is it the turpentine element that you consider unstable?

Your balsam ground system is based on pine resins in alcohol and turpentine...is it not? and the end user must thin with fresh turpentine and alcohol.

The only thing that I would agree with is if the Kremer rosin oil sits too long on the shelf the turpentine could start to thicken and then that would cause drying issues.

So comparing your balsam ground system which as you have stated is basically pine sap thinned with solvent and applied in thin layers to plain colophony thinned with solvent. I see little difference.

However I do see a difference when any oil is combined with colophony in these early coats. the oil seems to clog up and produce a more burned look very slightly.

Ernie,

My experience with spike is that long after the varnish is dry you will still smell spike when you open the case...so some residuals must be trying to escape.   Also if you add spike to the varnish it retards drying.

I thought we were talking about real rosin oil.  What Kremer is selling is not the same.  I see no problem with that material.  It is similar to the Balsam Ground in materials but different in approach.

on we go,

Joe

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