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David Burgess

Nice Nuts, Mr. Noykos

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Very well done tutorial, thanks for sharing.

I have only one criticism, there is no mention to the measure of the distance of the strings from the fingerbord or at least the height of the nut from fingerboard.

Am I the only one who uses these measures?

 

Davide

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I've seen lots of "pro" nuts with jutting, graceless lines. And why, when it's not horribly time-consuming to do otherwise? Well...it's a little time-consuming. Since I'm not at a high level myself, it's an easy thing to look for. A beautiful, glassy nut is well-nigh a guarantee of attention to detail in other spots. I can confuse myself with calipers and a ruler, or just look at that detail quickly. It's a surprisingly good indicator. :)

This nut is pretty sweet, yes...

I've played around with some nuts before myself, but nothing that stayed on an instrument permanently so far.

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Very well done tutorial, thanks for sharing.

I have only one criticism, there is no mention to the measure of the distance of the strings from the fingerbord or at least the height of the nut from fingerboard.

Am I the only one who uses these measures?

 

Davide

I have been using ...'not very much' as a rough guide :rolleyes: ..I use a few layer of painters tape on the FB to help gauge the groove height . . I would be very interested in what others are using , I have noticed that fiddlers seem to want less than classical players .

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  I have noticed that fiddlers seem to want less than classical players .

 

You've noticed correctly.

 

Fiddlers often want things that classical players would call "non" or "not really" functional.

 

Many fiddlers want the arc on top of the bridge, not in any relation to the arc on the fb's curvature, but it (the arc) has to do with their bow hitting the strings in a particular manner, oblique to fiddlers only - so that they can play the double stops they need to, and switch quickly from one set of double stops, to another set, and back again with lightning rapidity - and the remaining etc.s that apply to fiddling/classical playing techniques.

The E string often gets put on VERY low, and the nut has a hairs depth from the (E string) grooves bottom, to the surface of the fb... which is deadly to a classical violin player.

Yes, classical and fiddle players demand many things having to do with set up, that are in opposing camps.

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I have been using ...'not very much' as a rough guide :rolleyes: ..I use a few layer of painters tape on the FB to help gauge the groove height . . I would be very interested in what others are using , I have noticed that fiddlers seem to want less than classical players .

 

I use feeler gauges measuring the gap from strings to fingerboard, my standard set up measure 0.45mm under G and D, 0.40 A and 0.35 E string (classical player)

I can go a little lower or higher depending on types of strings, amount of fingerboard longitudinal scoop and specific requests, but assuming a maximum variation of 0.1 mm.

I too would be interested to hear the measures of other violin's set-up, maybe of famous players or violins.

It would be very useful and informative.

 

Davide

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I heard .05 for E and .075 for G. That is from the official teachings of a certain well-known school in the US.

The way I learned so far, in practice, is that a business card should be snug under the strings but not tooo snug. That's a way for morons like me who cannot reliably apprehend the difference between .05 and .075 not to mention .35 and .40, and for whom doing it by eye/feel is a crapshoot.

I want to hear about others' methods too! Famous violins too if anyone happens to have one sitting around...but it's interesting how everyone does this step differently...

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Very well done tutorial, thanks for sharing.

I have only one criticism, there is no mention to the measure of the distance of the strings from the fingerbord or at least the height of the nut from fingerboard.

Am I the only one who uses these measures?

 

Davide

Hi Davide,

I had a couple of measurements that I left out of the tutorial and people have pointed it out to me.  That's one of them.  I'm planning to go back and add a couple of things this next week.  I usually don't measure the distances to the string and just do it by eye.  I feel it once it's set up to to see how the strings feel and make adjustments.  But I should put some numbers in the article.  

 

I'm also planning to add a little tidbit about a method of cleaning the end of the fingerboard up when you have an uneven surface and it's hard to fit a nut to it.  

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I use feeler gauges measuring the gap from strings to fingerboard, my standard set up measure 0.45mm under G and D, 0.40 A and 0.35 E string (classical player)

I can go a little lower or higher depending on types of strings, amount of fingerboard longitudinal scoop and specific requests, but assuming a maximum variation of 0.1 mm.

I too would be interested to hear the measures of other violin's set-up, maybe of famous players or violins.

It would be very useful and informative.

 

Davide

I use .4 for the G and D, .35 for the A, and .3 for the E.

I use a handy set of feeler gauges that I got from Lee Valley; they are wider than the normal machinest/automotive ones I have seen. I hold the proper feeler gauge flat on the fingerboard and file the groove in the nut down until I just barely touch it with the slotting file.

-Michael

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Regarding the use of feeler gauges, and measuring the gap in thousandths of an inch and all, I can appreciate that attention to detail.

However, the gap on a new string will be different than on a used string. The gap on a used nut will be a bit different than the way it was originally set up, particularly with a few string brands which wear the nut pretty severely.

 

Though I've never tried it, I think Jones might have a pretty good idea with putting masking tape on the fingerboard. It's a repeatable thickness, and one might be able to file the grooves down to the point where there is an indication of the file hitting the tape. Might be a little more efficient than filing, putting strings on, measuring with a feeler gauge, and repeating the process numerous times.

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Hi Davide,

I had a couple of measurements that I left out of the tutorial and people have pointed it out to me.  That's one of them.  I'm planning to go back and add a couple of things this next week.  I usually don't measure the distances to the string and just do it by eye.  I feel it once it's set up to to see how the strings feel and make adjustments.  But I should put some numbers in the article.  

 

I'm also planning to add a little tidbit about a method of cleaning the end of the fingerboard up when you have an uneven surface and it's hard to fit a nut to it.  

 

Hi Matthew, and renewed compliments for the detailed tutorial.

 

I think learning to work by eye is essentially the basis of our work, but I also believe that the measures help to quantify and "memorizing" (or communicate, in the case of tutorial) a feeling.

I have to admit that I do almost all the work by eye but in the end I measure and I make fine adjustments.

The final judgment belongs always to the eye and the feeling, tools that are potentially much more precise than a feeler gauge but that require a lot of training before becoming reliable as a feeler gouge..........

 

Davide

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I think learning to work by eye is essentially the basis of our work, but I also believe that the measures help to quantify and "memorizing" (or communicate, in the case of tutorial) a feeling.

I have to admit that I do almost all the work by eye but in the end I measure and I make fine adjustments.

The final judgment belongs always to the eye and the feeling, tools that are potentially much more precise than a feeler gauge but that require a lot of training before becoming reliable as a feeler gouge..........

 

Davide

Thanks for posting that.

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