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Hello everybody,

 

I had this bow come in for repair last week, where the tip lining has come off. It has also split, but has brought a piece of bow wood with it!

 

I am currently thinking the best way forward is to simply glue the whole thing back together. I would really appreciate if any experienced bow repairers have any other suggestions! Coz I am otherwise at a loss!

 

 

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I am currently thinking the best way forward is to simply glue the whole thing back together. I would really appreciate if any experienced bow repairers have any other suggestions! Coz I am otherwise at a loss!

 

That's what I'd do.

 

It's off, it has to go back on.

Glue it.

Be careful, and make the finish/bond back to look like nothing was ever done to the bow.

Simple, right?.

If you know another way, go ahead and suggest it, and I (we) will ponder and discuss it. That crack in the ivory looks like it will bond back together without causing any problems...

If you're wondering what glue to use, well that's another kettle of fish.

Personally, I'd go with either superglue (my first choice) or hide glue, or even white glue, because I have all of them on hand and ready. 

Otherwise, there's a whole bandwagon of different glues (options) possible, and I'm sure we'll hear about all of them soon enough.

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One thing I would consider is to take a jewlers saw and cut away most of the tip that does not have wood glued to it. Then use superglue to glue the wood fragments still attached to the piece of tip. That way the wood fragments wil go back in place and index into where they came from perfectly.

 

Then carefully file off the small reamainder of tip and prepare and glue on a new tip.  I would consider this as one option.

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Hmmm, but...

 

with a repair like this one, the entire thing can reglue back to where it was, in one piece; the wood, ivory, and all. The tip ivory, though split, will glue back and the split will be joined back and become invisible, if glued properly and carefully. The slight curve is already there, a part of the tip that has simply come off.

Occasionally the surface (after gluing on) can stand a slight polishing - before the rehair . Many times the ivory wasn't polished to begin with, though.

 

It really is a simple, quick, (common bow) repair. The bow can resume its former function almost immediately.

(you do rehair, right?) 

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If the tip with its attached wood fragments fits back on perfectly, I would glue the whole thing back on in one gluing operation using thin superglue.  I would cover the tip with a bit of a thin transparent plastic bag and hold it precisely in position on the head of the bow with my left hand while applying a few drops of glue to the outside of the joint with my right.  (I am right-handed.)  The plastic would be so I wouldn't glue myself to the bow.  The thin glue will run into the joint and permeate it.  Then I would spray on a bit of glue accelerant to make it set instantly.  Next I would scrape off any any excess glue and gently probe the joint to make sure that it is tight all the way around the outside and also all the way around the inside of the mortise.  If I found any gaps or loose spots, I would give them another drop of glue.

 

If there is something wrong with the fit, or if I wanted to replace the tip for any reason (such as the crack), I would want to glue that fragment of the bow head back on first.  To do this, I would hold the tip on the head as described above, being especially careful to get the fragment precisely positioned.  Then I would apply a drop of glue to the fragment without caring if the rest of the tip got glued.  A shot of accelerant would set the glue.  Next I would remove the tip and replace it as usual.  To make sure that I didn't dislodge the fragment while removing the tip, I think I would try sawing through the liner between the fragment and the tip with a fine jeweler's saw.

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Hmmm, but...

 

with a repair like this one, the entire thing can reglue back to where it was, in one piece; the wood, ivory, and all. The tip ivory, though split, will glue back and the split will be joined back and become invisible, if glued properly and carefully. The slight curve is already there, a part of the tip that has simply come off.

Occasionally the surface (after gluing on) can stand a slight polishing - before the rehair . Many times the ivory wasn't polished to begin with, though.

 

It really is a simple, quick, (common bow) repair. The bow can resume its former function almost immediately.

(you do rehair, right?) 

 

 

Thanks Craig, this is what I will go with. I plan on using superglue, And, yes, I do rehair. :)

 

 

 

Brad - thanks for the advice. I have never heard of glue accelerant. I'll have to go find some and give it a try.

 

This bow is only worth a few hundred, so I think Stephens idea might be a wasted  effort, but even so I will keep it in mind for future reference.

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David, careful with accelerant on CA glue.  The fumes when it contacts the glue are very strong and will do a number on you if you or right over the gluing area.  Also, it will sometimes turn the CA glue white, just be careful.  I, personally, tend to not use it as the CA glue seems to dry fast enough for me and I don't like the glue turning white.  Brad, have you had that experience before?    jeff

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Yeah, that's why said I would _ consider_ removing most of the tip and saving the part that holds the wood together. 

 

The word Ivory popped up- thinking on a valuable bow why replace a broken ivory tip? Two strikes these days, ivory + cracked. On a valuable bow if the tip was ivory and it was all the way off, these days it might be smart to consider replacement with another material. 

 

My remedy was part thought experiment. 

 

______________________

 

I never use the the CA accelerant anymore, it's carcenogenic, it heats the work when it reacts with the glue, it stinks.  Here is a good substitute: baking soda. A little dab will accelerate CA.  

 

I had a job once where I had to build fairly large copy of a DC-3 airliner in balsa and aluminum. ( 7 foot wingspan )  I used lots of CA to build it. It needed the spray accelerant, on small stuff I switched to baking soda about ten years ago. You know, because airliners and bows are different.  :lol:

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I thought seeing as I've started the thread I may as well update. I decided to glue the tip back on, using quick drying shockproof superglue (I have no idea what the physical difference - if any - there is between this and any other superglue). I taped the tip in place exactly where I wanted it do go, then peeled off one side of the tape (the side with the bow fragment still attached. Peeling off the other side could damage the wood) and applied superglue to the surface. I then taped back over and, wearing plastic gloves, pressed the tip down and the cracked section back into place. Over all it took ten minutes working time.

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I'd be afraid the glue wouldn't  have time to wick in doing it in that order. 

Well, that's actually the point.  I have used it in the past so that the CA wouldn't use it's great capillary action and take off out of the joint (and into the material).  I assume that's why Steven used it with balsa wood, it would just keep suckin it out of the joint.  When (in guitar work) I used it for filler (not on wood bodies), I would use the accelerant (and subsequent baking soda) in a "fill" situation-this was before they had the thicker stuff.   jeff

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