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delusionsofgrandeur

Somewhere in Mongolia, a stallion is laughing at me

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Mawks were high eating; company vittles if you will. Carrier pigeons were haute cuisine too, something like a Cornish Game Hen, but with smaller drum sticks. ;)

 

Smaller yes, but tastier.

You've gotta admit that. Right?

Damn Bill, I never thought that you were immersed in this culture, but I see that you are. You get an a pluss for that.

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Hair handling takes some practice. My "Frust" is getting the hair properly spreading the ferrule as I set the wedge.

 

I am tossing in my sleep about salting the frog end of the hair with enough powdered rosin and pinching it into a broad

ribbon with stained glass pliers and heat. What I attempt with the comb doesn't always hold.

 

It likely takes more practice than rehairing a few bows to master this. I think isolating the problem of spreading hair and setting the wedge

in the ferrule is key.

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I put the hair in the frog first, then the head, and lastly the spread wedge.

 

I push the comb into the hair at the head at a skew angle, and comb it down to the frog, straightening the comb to 90 degrees as I go. This brings the hairs out to the width of the ferrule, while keeping them in line, if that makes sense.

 

I have come across people putting glue on both sides of the wedge, in an effort to secure the hair to the full width of the ferrule. This is a mistake - as the hair stretches, it can pull the spreadwedge out of the frog. Better to use a properly fitted wedge.

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I can relate do what you're feeling, and if you check some of my posts you'll find alot of begining rehairing questions that others have very kindly answered. One thing I would say is to find a method that makes sense and trust that your results will get better with experience. I don't know how many bows you've done but I was told it going to take 100 rehairs to feel comfortable with the process. I'm at about 60 now and even though I don't drastically see it, I am getting better results with experience. The time spent has gone from an hour + to about a half hour per rehair. I can see that now the hair is coming out a bit more even, with less flaming needed. I think the main thing is to do bows, many bows, any bows you can get ahold of, and it gradually gets easier. I actually got paid for my last few rehairs (small contribution towards hair). 

  Trust your process and trust that through LOTS of conscious repetition it will get better and easier. Hope that helps, 

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I can relate do what you're feeling, and if you check some of my posts you'll find alot of begining rehairing questions that others have very kindly answered. One thing I would say is to find a method that makes sense and trust that your results will get better with experience. I don't know how many bows you've done but I was told it going to take 100 rehairs to feel comfortable with the process. I'm at about 60 now and even though I don't drastically see it, I am getting better results with experience. The time spent has gone from an hour + to about a half hour per rehair. I can see that now the hair is coming out a bit more even, with less flaming needed. I think the main thing is to do bows, many bows, any bows you can get ahold of, and it gradually gets easier. I actually got paid for my last few rehairs (small contribution towards hair). 

  Trust your process and trust that through LOTS of conscious repetition it will get better and easier. Hope that helps, 

 

When I started rehairing, I went in for an entire weekend spent with a professional re hairer, and watched him rehair, and did a few myself, and got all of my initial questions answered.

 

Then I went home and rehaired school bows for an entire year.

Then I went back to the guy who taught me initially, and spent another entire afternoon with him, doing the same thing I did the first time...

That second time - I learned the critical parts that I missed the first time.

Those parts that a professional uses to get professional results every time. Because when you bring your bow to a professional rehairer, you expect and should get professional results, or not have to pay - right?

 

So, there are methods that result in a particular quality result, that is considered professional - but in order to get there - my opinion is, that the best and fastest way to arrive there (unless you're gifted in this aspect or practice) is to visit a professional rehairer until you understand ALL of the particulars involved. I do not believe that there is a very accurate way of telling someone how to do this over the internet, or if there is, it would truly require many many pages of specific questions and answers in order to get the "simple" requirements across. Then too most people will have different questions about different requirements of the process, & etc.

A thread, a new thread devoted to rehairing, with all of us re hairers opting in, would probably do it for some people here.

 

So, go ahead and ask away, I'm willing to answer anyone, about anything they are having difficulty with. Just realize that when I answer you - there will likely be ten other voices telling you that there is a much better way to do whatever it is that we're talking about.

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When I started rehairing, I went in for an entire weekend spent with a professional re hairer, and watched him rehair, and did a few myself, and got all of my initial questions answered.

 

Then I went home and rehaired school bows for an entire year.

Then I went back to the guy who taught me initially, and spent another entire afternoon with him, doing the same thing I did the first time...

That second time - I learned the critical parts that I missed the first time.

Craig: it's interesting, that's exactly the learning procedure I followed, except I returned for a refresher course after a few months. I don't do that many bows, so I find I'm out of practice when I haven't done one for awhile.

 

Regarding the Mawks vittles, I absorbed every episode of the Beverly Hillbillies when I was a kid, and thus learned the American language and customs :lol: .

I still enjoy watching a few episodes here and there when I relax.

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 I absorbed every episode of the Beverly Hillbillies when I was a kid, and thus learned the American language and customs :lol: .

I still enjoy watching a few episodes here and there when I relax.

 

There's quite a few of them on YT - I'm a great fan. And now that you reminded me, I'll reheat some possum innards. Killed a couple with the car a few days ago and they make for a good, clean meal. And cheap...  :lol:

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There's quite a few of them on YT - I'm a great fan. And now that you reminded me, I'll reheat some possum innards. Killed a couple with the car a few days ago and they make for a good, clean meal. And cheap...  :lol:

I make home made smoked garlic sausage, and often people comment : "This is really good, what do you make it from?"

 

My favorite reply is "Well...I carry a flat shovel with me in the truck. When I find something that looks more or less fresh on the road, I scrape it up and take it home."

 

(For Moose a shovel doesn't quite cut it. A front end loader is more useful.)

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(For Moose a shovel doesn't quite cut it. A front end loader is more useful.)

 

Unless the moose comes through the front windshield, and winds up half way in the passenger seat.

 

In that case, just keep on driving till you get home.

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Unless the moose comes through the front windshield, and winds up half way in the passenger seat.

 

In that case, just keep on driving till you get home.

You're either not very familiar with moose, or else you collect AFV's, (in which case it would either be stuck in the treads or draped on the glacis)  :lol:

 

Something similar happened to a friend of mine once while driving a Blazer, but with a whitetail deer.  It came through the windshield on the passenger side, showering his wife with glass frags, pinning her and breaking her arm.  Not fun  :( .

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I push the comb into the hair at the head at a skew angle, and comb it down to the frog, straightening the comb to 90 degrees as I go. This brings the hairs out to the width of the ferrule, while keeping them in line, if that makes sense.

 

 

Well thats an interesting thought.  I wonder if the opposite maneuver would help.  That is, to comb the hair with the comb at 90 degrees but then twist it to a skew angle before tying the knot, so as to bring the hairs into the knot in an organized way.

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I work from the head to the frog. After the hair is wedged in the head,I comb it out wet to the frog end in a flat ribbon. I hold the ribbon between my thumb and index finger just before where I want the frog end knot. With some difficulty I tie it off right at m finger and thumb tips while still holding the flat ribbon.

 

Once tied I try not to disturb or twist the ribbon of hair. Then I trim the excess and fuse the end with hide glue in the alcohol flame, and then wedge it into the frog mortice.

 

Edit: You don't want a moose coming through the windshield. Every year a few people get killed this way

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I feel this picture says it all.

448px-Moose_crossing_a_road.jpg

 

The moose is basically a rare example of a Pleistocene megafauna survivor which is expanding it's current range rather than endangered over a majority of it  They are lusty breeders and less than picky grazers. You can find some as far south as the Uintas in Utah if you know where to look.

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I've been wondering if we can declare "Medusa" a verb. As in, "this hair is Medusaing all over my workbench."

 

Hey, bud...

 

Have you gotten anything answered yet?

Have you cleaned up your rehair problems?

If not, please continue to ask questions and we'll get to the reason why. You've gone to the class and have seen it done... right? well, your problem is then one of final hair palcement or treatment, I believe, one we can find a suitable answer for fairly quickly - there's just something about this process that you didn't get originally. Was it this aspect that needs work;

 

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I'd love to see one of these in the flesh. Isn't it fantastic that there's still  land fit to support them.

 

Neighbors of mine were digging on their land recently, and found the skeleton of a giant Irish deer, extinct here for about 8000 years. It was a youngster, only about 6' tall , but the some of the skeletons in the museums stand at about 7' at the shoulder and have antlers that span 10'.

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That lazy bastard is crossing, I notice, without looking in either direction...

Yeah, I believe I've seen this exact same moose before...

Would you believe I bumped into a moose while fishing on the Rio Grande near Taos in the mid 1990s. He made it onto the evening news, was reckoned to be "lost", but he didn't look it to me ...

btw Craig, you really need to oil that chair!

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Moose is fine eating. The meat is very lean.

 

Edmonton is a city of about a million people. I live in the country, but sill only a 1/2 hour commute to the downtown city center. We have the odd moose wandering about the local area, and hundreds of white tail deer.

One of the favorite foods of moose is young alder branches .

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Craig, when you started your post with "Hey bud" I thought we were going to see flame throwers, but what we got was much better. Thanks for posting! So you do not soak your hair in water?

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Craig, when you started your post with "Hey bud" I thought we were going to see flame throwers, but what we got was much better. Thanks for posting! So you do not soak your hair in water?

 

Not with this particular technique.

The entire rehair is done with the hair dry... cut right from the bundle. then at the end of the process, it is "washsed" as shown. it is then slightly tightened to 'just slack' and then flamed. The hair is still wet, obviously, at that time (which is why I showed the"washing" part) the flaming is done. The rehair would still be "adequate" without the flaming... but the hairs would not align as exactly as they do when the ribbon is flamed.

So, you (the rehairer) decide... flaming or no flaming.

 

The second knot on the ribbon, which with this technique is the frog knot, (the tip knot being the first knot) must come from the rehair with no great unequal pulling in the ribbon. That's the job of getting the frog knot and the ferrule wedge in correctly with an equal spread and in equally tight etc. Which is also why some rehairers use a turning stick with that second knot... which I don't usually use.

 

The thing is, that the flaming is a last step in the rehair.

 The bow could easily be used without flaming.

That's how the (this specific method) rehair works. It would tighten up correctly anyway. The band of hair is loose and the flaming is done quickly because all you're trying to do here is to get the longer hairs (that will happen with any rehair) a 'bit' tighter... Once they have been flamed the hair retains its new "flamed" posture when it dries, and the band of hair is more even than it was originally.  

 

But it must be done quickly, (as shown) and it will not make an improper rehair, suddenly work well.

 

I'm glad that you all liked the film, it is the only part that wasn't shown in my original rehair video of ten years, or so, ago. 

 

Thanks again, any further questions about the technique?

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