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Tarisio changes end date of August auction


Rick Hyslop
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Hi Rick!

Hello fellow Maestronetters!

 

Sorry for the confusion here. Doing anything to the sales, especially on the last day of bidding, is our least favorite thing to do! The load times on the website were too long and the problem was too widespread to hold an auction so we sent this email to all registered bidders this morning:

 

 

Subject: Sale Postponed - August 2014 now ending 1 week later

 

Dear Bidder,
 

You may have noticed some technical difficulty on the website this morning. We apologize!

We want to ensure smooth and reliable bidding for everyone and have delayed the August 2014 Sale End by 1 week.

Lots now close on Wednesday & Thursday, August 13 & 14.
Ending times on those days remain the same as before.

 

Apologies again for the inconvenience. Please contact us at info@tarisio.com with any questions.

Best wishes,
Tarisio

 

 

Certainly give us a call or email as invited above if you have any other questions!

 

Best wishes,

Ethan

 

eladd@tarisio.com

(212) 307-7224

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Hi Chris,

 

That would be shameful. Luckily that's not the case and the problem with load times was disappointingly widespread (again). We're working hard to fix it and need to ask for the benefit of your doubt.

 

Your bid will be still be accepted. Please do call or email if you'd like to discuss your concerns! Thanks!

 

Ethan

 

eladd@tarisio.com

(212) 307-7224

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Tarisio shame on you! It appears like a cheap way of extending the auction.

 

Couldn't agree more. Shameless behavior and yanking. If I could withdraw my bid, I would.

 

Just plain unprofessional. 

 

The site is slow? So what. Bidders learn to deal with it. IMHO postponing the end time moves Tarisio to the second rung of auction houses.

 

The proper way to react would be with a notice to bidders that the site is slow through individual emails and site banners.

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Your point of view! For me the page was not just slow, but without any access. An e-mail or banner would have been useless. Because the system works with an extension after a new high bid, it would be also unfair to all other bidders over and a change of the terms. This is not ebay with it´s last second system. I can´t judge if the technical system is plain unprofessional, the behavior is definitely not to me. I do not want to be in the shoes of the Tarisio people now and in need to make a decision within minutes. Ethan, I hope the problem will be resolved quickly, and your crew will have a relaxing weekend after.

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It's easy to forget that auction houses also have a responsibility to their consignors.

I think this is the fair way to deal with the obvious technical difficulties which Tarisio are having (presumably due to new software implementation). Imagine the car-crash scenario of having to arbitrate between different buyers, all of whom firmly believed they had just won the bargain of a lifetime, when in reality someone else won it too!

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Martin, it's not easy to forget that, postponing the auction's end by 8 days proves this. Better ask yourself why would Tarisio implement new software during an auction in the first place? And why was it extended for a whole week? If someone can't bid he or she has to wait a whole week? It would have been better if the auction was extended for several hours or maybe a day, that would have been fair to both the consigner and bidder.

 

I also think Tarisio should offer the possibility to retract a bid if a bidder wants to in this situation, of course in other situations it should not be possible.

 

Martin please also note the amount of extra bidders and lots that have reached their reserve as opposed to a week ago...

 

As a side note I do wish to say that I've never had any problems with Tarisio in the past and enjoyed purchasing items through them, in fact their shipping speed and swift payment handling are better than most other auctionhouses out their.

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The following story may explain why access to some parts of the internet have been flaky and unpredictable recently - and will likely remain so for a while :

 

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/08/13/512k_invited_us_out_to_play/

Thank you much for posting this great article.  Having been in IT myself for a long time some years back, "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it.", about sums it up.  So long as the pointy haired bosses of the world continue to ignore the nerds that they depend on warning them of impending disaster, preventable IT disasters will continue..

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Hi Chris,

 

That would be shameful. Luckily that's not the case and the problem with load times was disappointingly widespread (again). We're working hard to fix it and need to ask for the benefit of your doubt.

 

Your bid will be still be accepted. Please do call or email if you'd like to discuss your concerns! Thanks!

 

Ethan

 

eladd@tarisio.com

(212) 307-722

 

If Tarisio were my client facing these problems, I would advise them to:

1. extend the auction - fix the problems.

2. cancel it - fix the problems.

 

Number two would be dependent on how confident they were they could fix the problems quickly.

 

Kevin Lawrence

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The following story may explain why access to some parts of the internet have been flaky and unpredictable recently - and will likely remain so for a while :

 

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/08/13/512k_invited_us_out_to_play/

 

Doesn't this have more to do with host servers which are older and now out of date ? Google is still running very well for me with no problems or lags. I don't think that it is because they or I got lucky. I would guess that Tarisio's problem is not with the "internet" but with their hosting service. I am not personally having major problems with other sites.

 

Thoughts ?

 

r.

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Doesn't this have more to do with host servers which are older and now out of date ? Google is still running very well for me with no problems or lags. I don't think that it is because they or I got lucky. I would guess that Tarisio's problem is not with the "internet" but with their hosting service. I am not personally having major problems with other sites.

 

Thoughts ?

 

r.

No, as the article explained, it's a network infrastructure problem at the ISPs, and everywhere else as well.  Servers store, manipulate, and regurgitate data.  Routers are part of the data plumbing system that brings that data to your desktop.  The article is expressing outrage that we all saw this coming but the money types have been consistently vetoing fixing it.  Routing table overflow problems are apparently being exacerbated by hackers (probably cyberwar types, and probably opportunistically taking advantage of the router problems) jacking with the Internet routing itself, making things worse. 

 

For the record, Y2K, (mentioned in the article as a success) was a skin-of-the-teeth escape for most of the companies and agencies involved, as, while being warned about the 2 digit date problem since at least the 1980's nobody in charge really got rolling on it until 1997 or so.  The last minute Hail Mary approach required the hiring of thousands of contractors practically overnight, and was a back to the wall survival situation for all the players involved.  I have few pleasant memories of the period.  Apparently, nobody important learned anything from it, but what else is new?

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Sure but who are running the ISPs ? Isn't the internet a network of ISPs ? In this case there can be weak links but if the path avoids these then everything should work fine. Try to ping a few sites including Tarisio.

 

r.

The internet is more than just a network of ISPs -- the ISPs provide the bottom layer of a 3 tier system which is connected up with BGP routers.

Wikipedia now has a page about the events of '512k day' http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/512K 

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The internet is more than just a network of ISPs -- the ISPs provide the bottom layer of a 3 tier system which is connected up with BGP routers.

Wikipedia now has a page about the events of '512k day' http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/512K 

 

I had already read that, but it doesn't explain that there are some sites not experiencing problems. Why would this be ? Google is a prime example. Not a single hiccup that I have experienced. If the "internet" works for some and not for others, it makes me question the logic of the wiki article. I am by no means an IT guru, however as a person who tries always to do an excellent job, with no excuses, the present situation (512K) seems to be a case where someone isn't pulling their weight or ??? Likely for financial reasons, but who cares what the motive is, it is poor "workmanship" and leads to poor services which we as a whole are paying big bucks for. When will it be possible to hold someone accountable for poor internet services and or management ?

My guess is unfortunately probably never. What would happen if you or I failed at doing our jobs properly ?

 

So this leads to the question. Who do you feel could be held accountable and why ?

 

I look forward to your thoughts on this.

 

Cheers.

 

r.

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Haha. My previous post didn't come out right. Maybe there is something to this 512 stuff.

 

Here is what I wrote in response to Mike's post #19:

 

I had already read that, but it doesn't explain that there are some sites not experiencing problems. Why would this be ? Google is a prime example. Not a single hiccup that I have experienced. If the "internet" works for some and not for others, it makes me question the logic of the wiki article. I am by no means an IT guru, however as a person who tries always to do an excellent job, with no excuses, the present situation (512K) seems to be a case where someone isn't pulling their weight or ??? Likely for financial reasons, but who cares what the motive is, it is poor "workmanship" and leads to poor services which we as a whole are paying big bucks for. When will it be possible to hold someone accountable for poor internet services and or management ?

My guess is unfortunately probably never. What would happen if you or I failed at doing our jobs properly ?

 

So this leads to the question. Who do you feel could be held accountable and why ?

 

I look forward to your thoughts on this.

 

Cheers.

 

r.

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Haha. My previous post didn't come out right. Maybe there is something to this 512 stuff.

 

Here is what I wrote in response to Mike's post #19:

Not a single hiccup ---- why should this be :

I had a go a writing an explanation for this but try as I might I couldn't produce anything sensibly short enough for here.

I think that what you saw/noticed (no problems) is entirely consistent with the nature of what happened with the internet 'collective' of BGP routers. 

By contrast I was unable to access ebay.co.uk for hours, and other parts of the internet were also unavailable or flaky.  In fact ebay.co.uk still hasn't fully 'recovered' from what I can see.  (That may not all be down to 512k though).

 

Who is/should be accountable = nobody.  The internet is like that - thank heavens.  Otherwise it would be entirely in the grip of some self-serving politicians.

Bear in mind the problem the other day was from a very short-lived injection of too many routes into the system by a top tier provider - I presume they quickly saw the chaos they had produced and removed the new routes from their local routers but the 'wave' of excess routes information perhaps crossed round the internet's routers many times thereafter until it finally died out, rendering rather punch-drunk any routers susceptible to route overload on the way.

Some time soon the 512k limit will be exceeded all the time but one hopes that enough routers will have been re-configured to cope with some (unspecified) higher number of routes.

Meanwhile the demand for ipv4 address will drive fragmentation and the route count up inexorably...and the salvation of ipv6 seems to be going nowhere because of cost and practicality.

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Not a single hiccup ---- why should this be :

I had a go a writing an explanation for this but try as I might I couldn't produce anything sensibly short enough for here.

I think that what you saw/noticed (no problems) is entirely consistent with the nature of what happened with the internet 'collective' of BGP routers. 

By contrast I was unable to access ebay.co.uk for hours, and other parts of the internet were also unavailable or flaky.  In fact ebay.co.uk still hasn't fully 'recovered' from what I can see.  (That may not all be down to 512k though).

 

Who is/should be accountable = nobody.  The internet is like that - thank heavens.  Otherwise it would be entirely in the grip of some self-serving politicians.

Bear in mind the problem the other day was from a very short-lived injection of too many routes into the system by a top tier provider - I presume they quickly saw the chaos they had produced and removed the new routes from their local routers but the 'wave' of excess routes information perhaps crossed round the internet's routers many times thereafter until it finally died out, rendering rather punch-drunk any routers susceptible to route overload on the way.

Some time soon the 512k limit will be exceeded all the time but one hopes that enough routers will have been re-configured to cope with some (unspecified) higher number of routes.

Meanwhile the demand for ipv4 address will drive fragmentation and the route count up inexorably...and the salvation of ipv6 seems to be going nowhere because of cost and practicality.

 

Hey there Mike. Thanks for your reply.

 

Okay I understand the value of the freedom aspect of the internet but I have concerns. (BTW Freedom of speech and sharing ideas is a great thing and very important, but when freedom from any regulations regarding responsibilty to uphold an agreed upon/expected standard of functional behaviour from the internet due to what is apparently a lack of dilligence, I am definitely not on board.)

 

Should we still feel good about paying for a service which cannot deliver ? Case in point. Tarisio has taken a hit on their credibility whether or not anyone is willing to admit to such a thing. Why did this supposed 512k collapse happen ? How did it possibly impact their reputation and the August sale ? How did it impact individuals interested in bidding ? I know how it impacted me, but I am just one person. Who is responsible for all of this ? If "no one" is the answer then maybe the internet game is for me ? No accountability and constantly rising fees with no guarantee of service or need to upgrade equipment.

 

It seems like taking candy from people who have no clue why they are losing all of their candy.

 

Sincerely.

 

r.

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Hey there Mike. Thanks for your reply.

 

Okay I understand the value of the freedom aspect of the internet but I have concerns. (BTW Freedom of speech and sharing ideas is a great thing and very important, but when freedom from any regulations regarding responsibilty to uphold an agreed upon/expected standard of functional behaviour from the internet due to what is apparently a lack of dilligence, I am definitely not on board.)

 

Should we still feel good about paying for a service which cannot deliver ? Case in point. Tarisio has taken a hit on their credibility whether or not anyone is willing to admit to such a thing. Why did this supposed 512k collapse happen ? How did it possibly impact their reputation and the August sale ? How did it impact individuals interested in bidding ? I know how it impacted me, but I am just one person. Who is responsible for all of this ? If "no one" is the answer then maybe the internet game is for me ? No accountability and constantly rising fees with no guarantee of service or need to upgrade equipment.

 

It seems like taking candy from people who have no clue why they are losing all of their candy.

 

Sincerely.

 

r.

Candy may not be the best analogy - most ISP customers don't understand what they are buying.  For example, consumer programs and politicians have run campaigns to complain that consumers don't get the peak bandwidth that they have 'paid for', having completely failed to understand what broadband contention is and how internet lines are costed.

Consumers' contracts with ISPs can't cover what happens on the rest of the internet beyond the ISP's peripheral routers - the ISP has no control over that.  If an ISP loses internet connectivity because its own peripheral routers fail or are mismanaged then there might be liability (usually only to business customers) but few customers would be able to identify where the problem really lies (desktop operating systems do have the tools but few know how to use them).  If you need guaranteed connectivity and service level then leased lines are the thing - they really are expensive and slow compared to consumer broadband but the bandwidth is all yours.

 

Re: Tarisio - I don't know whether Tarisio's problems were related to 512k or not - they/others may have wrongly assumed it was down to their server(s) or isp.  If it was purely 512k then there really is nothing they could have done about it, other than altering the bidding periods.  Other types of business can achieve some resilience by spending money and running multiple servers in different locations, but a live bidding system won't work if disparate multiple servers get cut off from one another because of internet failure.

From the point of view of the consumer using Tarisio - if it matters enough that you are reliably connected to the internet then get a business line, nowadays you'll pay a bit more for a slower peak speed than a consumer line but there will be an agreed service level and lower contention and a quicker repair when it goes wrong.

 

In general the internet routing system is 'self-healing' when there are local failures so that alternative (slower/longer) routes get used until things get mended (512k was an exception).

But of course events such as a massive solar flare could wipe out the internet and most surface electrical systems for a prolonged period of time,  I think we (planet earth) were narrowly missed by one very recently.  That would really make 512k look miniscule.

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Hey there Mike. I would guess that you must be in the business of IT in some form or other ?

 

At any rate here are my respectful replies to your last post.

 

Candy may not be the best analogy - most ISP customers don't understand what they are buying. 

 

In my analogy "candy" was money so it does make some sense. Like taking candy from a...

 

 

 most ISP customers don't understand what they are buying.  For example, consumer programs and politicians have run campaigns to complain that consumers don't get the peak bandwidth that they have 'paid for', having completely failed to understand what broadband contention is and how internet lines are costed.

Consumers' contracts with ISPs can't cover what happens on the rest of the internet beyond the ISP's peripheral routers - the ISP has no control over that.  If an ISP loses internet connectivity because its own peripheral routers fail or are mismanaged then there might be liability (usually only to business customers) but few customers would be able to identify where the problem really lies (desktop operating systems do have the tools but few know how to use them).

 

My point was exactly this. No accountability as far as I can see. We are blindly expected to pay out our monthly amounts and keep quiet if things aren't exactly as we were led to believe they might be. No thanks !

 

 

From the point of view of the consumer using Tarisio - if it matters enough that you are reliably connected to the internet then get a business line, nowadays you'll pay a bit more for a slower peak speed than a consumer line but there will be an agreed service level and lower contention and a quicker repair when it goes wrong.
 

 

Are you suggesting that if I had a "business line" that I would have been free of any internet problems in this case ? If this is true then your logic is unfortunately in my opinion rather flawed. My "problem" was not my service but that of Tarisio.

 

But of course events such as a massive solar flare could wipe out the internet and most surface electrical systems for a prolonged period of time,  I think we (planet earth) were narrowly missed by one very recently.  That would really make 512k look miniscule.

 

Failing your above mentioned scenario, I would be content to lose my internet for many months if the company that brought it to me made some sort of apology and of course didn't expect payment for little or no service during that period, but that won't happen. I will just get excuses from lackies and then promptly be threatened for payment if I make any challenge. Not too fair really.

 

This is a violin forum though and I guess not really the place for such a discussion. I appreciate your thoughts, but we clearly disagree.

 

That is the nature of discourse though. Maybe particularily so in cyberspace.

 

Best.

 

r.

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